Mariss Jansons

Conductor

Mariss Jansons

Jansons was born in Riga, the son of conductor Arvid Jansons. His mother, who was Jewish, gave birth to him in hiding after her father and brother were killed in the Riga ghetto. In 1946, his father won second prize in a national competition and was chosen by Yevgeny Mravinsky to be his assistant at the Leningrad Philharmonic. When his family joined him in 1956, young Jansons entered the Leningrad Conservatory, where he studied piano and conducting, although his father urged him to continue playing violin. In 1969 he continued his training in Vienna with Hans Swarowsky and in Salzburg with Herbert von Karajan.

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Mariss Jansons conducts Richard Strauss

Mariss Jansons conducts Richard Strauss

The 100th release of BR-KLASSIK Label!


Strauss, R:

Eine Alpensinfonie, Op. 64

Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24


At the age of just fifteen, the budding composer Richard Strauss (1864-1949) lost his way during a summer hike on the Heimgarten in the Bavarian Alps, and ended up in a thunderstorm. The next day, he fantasized about the experience on the piano. - Twenty years later, that memory had matured into a concept describing a one-day hike in the form of a symphonic poem, and in 1915 – a further fifteen years later – Strauss finally completed his masterpiece. The hike begins in the darkness before dawn, and after sunrise the ascent goes through a forest, past a stream and a waterfall, through meadows and pastures, and up to a glacier. The hiker then loses his way, and after several risky moments arrives at the summit, where he also experiences a vision. The weather then suddenly worsens, and the descent is accompanied by heavy rain and fierce thunderstorms. The eventful day - summarized in just sixty minutes of music - ends with a sunset, and darkness returns.

"An Alpine Symphony" is probably Strauss' most famous symphonic poem. Its content is easily understandable, and the work became especially well-known for its gigantic orchestra. The music is far from heavy-handed, however, with many of the passages orchestrated like chamber music. Like a kind of greeting from the Bavarian Alps, as it were, the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks and its chief conductor Mariss Jansons have placed this masterpiece, and the music of Richard Strauss in general, on the programme of their forthcoming tour of Asia in late 2016. The live recording of “Alpine Symphony” concerts planned for October 2016 in Munich’s Philharmonie im Gasteig is enhanced on this latest CD from BR-KLASSIK by the addition of Strauss’ symphonic poem "Death and Transfiguration", first performed in 1890; the recording here is of concerts performed in Munich in February 2014. – We thus have two very recent interpretations of two of this great German composer’s most important tone poems on one CD.

Live-Recording Munich, Philharmonie im Gasteig 10.2016 (Alpine Symphony); 02.2014 (Death and Tr.)

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BR Klassik - 900148

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Richard Strauss: Don Quixote & Dvorak: Symphony No. 8

Richard Strauss: Don Quixote & Dvorak: Symphony No. 8


Dvorak:

Carnival Overture, Op. 92

Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88

Elizondo:

Danza Latinamericanas

Massenet:

Don Quichotte: Interlude No. 2

Strauss, R:

Don Quixote, Op. 35


Yo-Yo Ma (cello), Wen Xiao Zheng (viola) & Anton Barakhovsky (violin)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Mariss Jansons

Recorded at the Philharmonie am Gasteig, Munich, 2016

As an artist in residence with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, the American cellist Yo-Yo Ma had the opportunity to do what is perhaps the second thing he loves the most after playing: sharing his love of music with others.

During his residency, he transformed himself from sensitive teacher to inimitable Bach interpreter to first cello of a major symphony orchestra.

Yo-Yo Ma doesn’t fade away into the music, nor does he take a worshipful attitude towards the pieces he performs. From the moment he walks onto the stage, he exudes charisma that immediately confirms his exceptional status as the 'best cellist in the world'.

With its ten variations on a theme of knightly character for full orchestra, Richard Strauss’ tone poem 'Don Quixote' not only depicts the colorful adventures of Cervantes' chivalrous hero, but also functions as a virtuoso display of glorious solo melodies embedded in stunning orchestral passages. It is, in a way, a second Strauss cello concerto. Joining 'the Don' later is a viola solo that personifies the faithful Sancho Panza and is played by Wen Xiao Zheng.

To those in the know, Jansons’ partnership with the great Munich-based BRSO is one of the most transcendent conductor-orchestra pairings.

Approx. 111 minutes

HD, 5.1 surround sound

DVD Amaray, NTSC Picture format 16 :9

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BR-KLASSIK Greatest Moments

BR-KLASSIK Greatest Moments

CD Sampler plus Catalogue 2016


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Rhapsody

Rhapsody

Live-Recording, Munich, Herkulessaal, October 2015


Chabrier:

España

Enescu:

Romanian Rhapsody in A major, Op. 11 No. 1

Gershwin:

Rhapsody in Blue

Denis Matsuev (piano)

Liszt:

Hungarian Rhapsody, S244 No. 2 in C sharp minor

Ravel:

Rapsodie Espagnole


This latest CD from BR KLASSIK contains five great rhapsodies, devised and elaborated by very different composers from different regions, with a lot of imagination and local flavour. With his rhapsody "España" the Frenchman Emmanuel Chabrier focused on the Iberian music and folk music so popular at the time, as did his more famous compatriot Maurice Ravel with his "Rhapsodie espagnole", the four-movement structure of which still harks back to long-outdated symphonic forms. From the Hungarian-born Franz Liszt we have the famous "Hungarian Rhapsody" No. 2, and from the Romanian composer George Enescu the scarcely less famous and popular "Romanian Rhapsody". The American George Gershwin created what was probably the most famous example of the genre in the 20th century with his "Rhapsody in Blue" for piano and orchestra… The Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks under their chief conductor Mariss Jansons are a guarantee of outstanding interpretative quality for these large-scale rhapsodic musical works. The Russian pianist Denis Matusev – internationally famous ever since he won the Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in Moscow in 1998 – proves to be a sovereign and stylistically confident interpreter of George Gershwin’s concertante masterpiece, with its numerous jazz elements. The live recording of this concert was made in October 2015 in the Herkulessaal of the Munich Residenz.

“Ravel’s achingly sensuous Rapsodie espagnole receives the finest performance here, infused with infectious warmth that is sensually beguiling.” BBC Music Magazine, December 2016 ****

“[the Ravel] is played with a satisfying balance of exactitude and flair…[the Gershwin is] full of fire and fun, despite the occasional overindulgence” Gramophone Magazine, October 2016

“This disc is a bit of a guilty pleasure.” MusicWeb International, 21st October 2016

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BR Klassik - 900146

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Mariss Jansons conducts Sibelius

Mariss Jansons conducts Sibelius


Sibelius:

Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 43

Live Recording Munich, Herkulessaal November 2015

Finlandia, Op. 26

Live Recording Munich, Philharmonie im Gasteig, October 2015

Karelia Suite, Op. 11

Live Recording Munich, Philharmonie im Gasteig, October 2015


The latest new release from BR KLASSIK gathers together on one CD the most famous and popular musical works of the great Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. The music of the symphonic poem "Finlandia", op 26, which premiered in Helsinki in 1899 as a "historical tableau" from Finnish history, inspired Sibelius's compatriots immediately. The work - as it were the unofficial national anthem of Finland - became internationally known in 1900, and continues to be world-famous today, not only because of the hymn-like chorale that concludes it. Sibelius's "Karelia" Suite op. 11, composed some years earlier, which refers to the Finnish landscape of Karelia and the legends of the "Kalevala" epic, was also received very enthusiastically by the national Finnish movement at that time and soon became internationally famous as well. The Symphony No. 2, op 43, the best-known and most popular of the composer's seven completed symphonies, premiered in 1902. With this work Sibelius managed to emancipate himself, moving from being a merely national Finnish composer to an international one. The clear, confident character of the work goes far beyond the purely "exotic" national style, and its "absolute" music remains unaffected by any extra-musical programme. Whether we appreciate Sibelius as an absolute musician or as Finland's national composer, and whether we regard his music as international or as an expression of Finland's struggle for independence – as his compatriots have done to this day – the music remains highly individual and unique, and has successfully established itself in the international concert repertoire. The exemplary interpretations on this CD by the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks under its chief conductor Mariss Jansons were recorded at several Munich concerts during the autumn of 2015. Sensitively conducted and full of gripping majesty, the performances show clearly why Sibelius's symphonies have retained their importance to the present day.

“Virtuoso conducting and immaculate orchestral playing” Gramophone Magazine, August 2016

“A thrilling Finlandia, an odd Karelia and a very individual take on the symphony; for Jansons fans only” MusicWeb International, 13th June 2016

BR Klassik - 900144

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Beethoven: Symphonies 1/2/3

Beethoven: Symphonies 1/2/3

Live from Suntory Hall, Tokyo, 2012


Beethoven:

Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21

Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36

Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 55 'Eroica'


Individual release from the previously released complete edition (107537).

Ludwig van Beethoven was the first hero of bourgeois musical life. Although Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had already made the transition from the older feudal and ecclesiastical traditions to the new culture of public concerts, periodicals and amateur music-making, Beethoven was the first composer to see himself as an artist who represented this bourgeois music culture as an individual, rather than simply supplying music for it, as composers had previously done for the church or the aristocracy.

Beethoven‘s first three symphonies can be seen as experiments in the heroic style. What is intimated in the First Symphony (1800) in a new firmness of musical tone and the replacement of dancelike, elegantly fl owing intonations by scherzo and march, takes on more concrete form in the Second Symphony (1803). This is a monumental symphony – a fact that escapes today’s listeners for the simple reason that it was followed by the Third, which is even more expansive in its design. This Third Symphony (1805), called “Eroica”, is approximately twice as long as any symphony by Haydn and one of most popular orchestral works by Beethoven.

Special Feature: Mariss Jansons rehearses Beethoven (Bonus film, 44 mins)

Sound Formats: PCM Stereo, DD 5.0

Picture Format: 16:9

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DVD 9 / NTSC

Running Time: 116 mins + 44 mins (Bonus)

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Arthaus Musik Mariss Jansons Complete Beethoven Symphonies - 102175

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Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, Op. 100

Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, Op. 100

Recorded Live at Concertgebouw Amsterdam on 17-19 and 21 September 2014


In this recording of Sergei Prokofiev's masterful Fifth Symphony, Mariss Jansons and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra find themselves on familiar ground. Already in 1948 (four years after the world premiere) Eduard van Beinum introduced it to the orchestra. A long line of famous conductors followed, including André Previn, George Szell, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Valery Gergiev. The fact that this music is part of Mariss Jansons' musical DNA, may explain the feeling of authenticity in this recording.

“this is wonderful, sensuous, lush sound … Jansons has a great sensitivity to style.” CD Review, 9th July 2016

“With a wonderful if rather too plush-sounding hall and a glorious orchestra, Jansons secures a soft-grained interpretation that should satisfy his admirers” Gramophone Magazine, June 2016

“This Jansons version is one of the finest I’ve encountered. His is a version that demonstrates the symphony’s stature. It’s a great shame that the playing time is so meagre but, for once, that’s a secondary issue: the quality of the performance, interpretation and recorded sound trump the issue of the playing time.” MusicWeb International, May 2016

“Jansons treats the score with a deep, exalted sort of heroism that speaks beyond any immediate politics of the piece. We get beautiful playing from the great Dutch orchestra: lines unfolding graciously with that majestic Concertgebouw sound, which glowers and glows from the bottom up and in which Jansons takes plenty of time to wallow.” The Guardian, 21st April 2016 ****

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Mariss Jansons conducts Dvorak & Suk

Mariss Jansons conducts Dvorak & Suk


Dvorak:

Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88

Live Recording, Munich, Gasteig, Philharmonie 29. – 30.01.2016

Carnival Overture, Op. 92

Live Recording, Munich, Gasteig, Philharmonie 29. – 30.01.2016

Suk:

Serenade for String Orchestra in E flat, Op. 6

Studio Recording, Munich, 25.01.2016


Dvořák's lyrical and cheerful Eighth Symphony, which premiered successfully in Prague on February 2, 1890, is one of the famous Bohemian composer's most often-played works. He succeeded here "in writing a work different from my other symphonies, with individual thoughts elaborated in a new way". Every movement and every melody in this music reflects the fact that it was wholly inspired by the landscape of Bohemia. Dvořák's close familiarity with and love of Slavonic folk music can be clearly heard, as can his deep preoccupation with the symphonies of Tchaikovsky: the rhapsodic Adagio and the waltz-like Scherzo, for example, in their melodic inventiveness as well as their formal structure, are both highly reminiscent of the famous Russian composer. – Alongside Dvořák's much-performed Ninth Symphony, his Eighth is a further masterpiece of late 19th-century instrumental music. Josef Suk's Serenade for Strings of 1892 is far more than a mere time-filler on this CD. The first successful composition by this budding Czech composer – who was Dvořák's pupil and son-in-law – is audibly influenced by the musical and aesthetic ideas of his teacher and mentor, but is also a highly individual work in its own right and an important example of the genre. In the recordings of the two concerts performed in the Philharmonie im Gasteig on January 29 and 30, 2016, the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks under Mariss Jansons successfully demonstrated that Dvořák's traditional yet visionary symphonic writing continues to retain all its validity today: the interpretation is sensitive, dynamic and majestic. Suk's Serenade for Strings was recorded in a studio only a few days beforehand.

Exciting live atmosphere (Dvořák) combined with a studio production (Suk).

Programme contains important works of late 19th-century Czech instrumental music.

Recording of a concert that took place as recently as January 29 and 30, 2016 together with a studio production on January 25, 2016

The Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks under its chief conductor Mariss Jansons, regularly praised for his special sensitivity where Slavonic music is concerned.

“Tempi are relaxed and phrases are lovingly caressed, dabbed with generous applications of rubato…another virtue is the sheer beauty of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra’s playing, not only in terms of tonal refinement but internal balance” Gramophone Magazine, July 2016

BR Klassik - 900145

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Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor

Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor

Recorded Live at Concertgebouw Amsterdam on 19, 21 and 23 March 2014


Ever since the tenure of its chief conductor Eduard van Beinum (1945–59), the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra has cherished one of the greatest Bruckner symphonic traditions in the world. With this release of Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony, Mariss Jansons and the Concertgebouw Orchestra add a new chapter to the RCO’s impressive performance and recording history of Bruckner’s works.

“magnificent.” BBC Music Magazine, June 2016 ****

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Dvorak: Stabat Mater, Op. 58

Dvorak: Stabat Mater, Op. 58

Live from the KKL Concert Hall, Lucerne March 3 2015


Erin Wall (soprano), Mihoko Fujimura (mezzo-soprano), Christian Elsner (tenor), Liang Li (bass)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra & Choir, Mariss Jansons

"... stood the mournful Mother weeping" whispers the chorus after the orchestral introduction of Antonín Dvorák 's most celebrated choral work, the Stabat Mater Op. 58. As the work builds to include the four vocal soloists, the obsessively repeated main motif of a descending chromatic line begins to work its magic on the rapt audience.

And under the baton of Mariss Jansons, the Chorus and Symphony Orchestra of the Bayerischer Rundfunk, graced with four superb soloists, take us to a higher sphere of artistry, where hushed tones alternate with glorious fortissimi. Next to a Bruckner symphony performed by Jansons and his ensemble, the Stabat Mater was, in the words of the Neue Zürcher Zeitung, "the second high point of this year's Lucerne Easter Festival," the venue of our concert. Jansons sees within it a broad, profound range of sorrow. Having begun the work in late 1875 / early 1876, but soon set aside, Dvorák returned to it after two tragedies befell him and plunged him into an uncharacteristically melancholic mood: the accidental death of his 11-month-old daughter Rose and the succumbing to smallpox of his three-year-old son Otakar. Yet even stricken with grief, Dvorák could not resist writing simple, folk-like, life-affirming melodies for his luminous Stabat Mater. To master these tragic events, the devout Catholic Dvorák sought comfort and strength in God and in the composition of a work dedicated to the Mother of Sorrows.

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