Gramophone Magazine Editor's Choice

December 2007

Disc of the Month

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Bach, J S: Christmas Oratorio, BWV248

Awards:

Gramophone Magazine

Disc of the Month - December 2007

Catalogue No:

88697333212

Discs:

2

Release date:

6th Oct 2008

Barcode:

0886973332122

Length:

82 minutes

Medium:

CD
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Bach, J S: Christmas Oratorio, BWV248


CD - 2 discs

$22.50

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Originally released in November 2007 as a limited edition specially-packaged pressing, Sony BMG is now making this definitive recording of Bach’s Christmas Oratorio available in standard packaging format

Click here for alternative recordings of this work.

Editor's Choice

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Maria

Maria

Standard CD jewel version


 

Rataplan

Come Dolce A Me Favelli

Bellini:

Ah, non credea mirarti (from La Sonnambula)

Ah! non giunge uman pensiero (from La Sonnambula)

O rendetemi la speme...Qui la voce sua soave...Vien, diletto (from I Puritani)

Malibran version

Vien, diletto, è in ciel la luna (from I Puritani)

Casta Diva (from Norma)

Donizetti:

Prendi, per me sei libero (from L'Elisir d'amore)

Garcia, M:

Yo Que Soy Contrabandista

E Non Lo Vedo ... Son Regina

Hummel, J:

Air À La Tirolienne Avec Variations

Mendelssohn:

Infelice - concert aria for soprano and orchestra, Op. 94

Pacini:

Se Un Mio Desir ... Cedi Al Duol

Ira Del Ciel

Dopo Tante E Tante Pene

Persiani:

Cari Giorni


Cecilia Bartoli (mezzo), Maxim Vengerov (violin)

Orchestra La Scintilla & International Chamber Soloists, Ádám Fischer

Read Presto's complete review of this disc here.

"Opera ... must make one weep, shudder, die." Vincenzo Bellini

“[Bartoli] has aimed not only to present Malibran's repertoire but also to capture her sound. Bartoli's rich voice, with its pyrotechnical capabilities and dramatic powers, couldn’t have been better suited to the task...More than just a history lesson though, this is wonderful music sung by a modern-day star.” Charlotte Gardner, bbc.co.uk, 11th January 2008

“Bartoli, who has spent the last twenty years submerged in earlier music, has a keen interest in the musicological performance practice ethic, and an astonishingly flexible voice, with both rich contralto notes and dancing top notes, might just be closer to Malibran (and therefore the sound that Rossini and Bellini had in mind) than anyone else since.” Presto Classical, 12th November 2007

“Bartoli…sings everything with vivid personality. The accompaniments are well handled under Adam Fischer.” BBC Music Magazine, December 2007 ****

“At best, she has brought an individuality and sense of personal commitment to her singing, rare both in kind and degree. Voice and usage have always been fascinating, whatever their limitations. Enthusiasm, the awareness of a remarkable will–power and with it the recognition of an adventurous musical spirit in seeking out new material: all these have further distinguished her. And now she appears to have found a figure on whom she can hang all these gifts while exploring the repertoire that appeals to her most strongly. Maria Malibran (1808-36) is now remembered for her death almost as much as for her life. In poor health, she sang in a duet which became so competitive that she determined to repeat it, thus vanquishing her rival, even if it killed her. And it did; at least, she died (in Manchester, aged 28) nine days later. The concentration of a scorching will–power is strikingly caught in Bartoli's performances: in the cabaletta of the first item, from Pacini's Irene, for instance, the phrase 'mi squarcia il seno' is almost ferociously intense. Gaiety and charm were also at Malibran's command, as they are at Bartoli's in the Spanish song by the father, Manuel García, and in Maria's own Rataplan. The quality of her voice is variously reported (at times she was said to be practically voiceless), but there is no doubt about the magical effect of her singing upon her audiences. If it was anything like the spell Bartoli herself casts in the quiet rapture of her 'Casta diva' it must have been memorable indeed” Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“This new recital is a brilliant summation of Cecilia Bartoli's art and the special contribution it makes.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

Presto Disc of the Week

12th November 2007

GGramophone Awards 2008

Best of Category - Recital

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Decca - E4759078

(CD)

$13.25

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Bloch - Piano Quintets

Bloch - Piano Quintets


Bloch, E:

Piano Quintet No. 1

Night

Paysages (Landscapes)

Two Pieces for string quartet

Piano Quintet No. 2


Serenity and meditation contrast with melancholy and savagery; primitive passions yield to poignancy, nobility and tenderness in Bloch’s accomplished chamber music. Five substantial pieces are recorded here, dating from different stages of the composer’s career and demonstrating both the programmatic elements of his writing and his Impressionistic side. Bloch’s deep affinity for string instruments and the piano is also given ample expression in these works, all of which deserve a permanent place in the chamber music repertoire.

“In the First Quintet Lane and the Goldners manage to communicate the urgency and immediacy of Bloch's musical argument… the opening passage projected with a frenzy that generates considerable momentum and purpose throughout the rhapsodic first movement. ...the performers are equally persuasive in capturing the langour and hypnotic sensuousness of the Andante mistico.” BBC Music Magazine, February 2008 *****

“A fabulous CD this, easily the best recording of Bloch's chamber music I've heard in years… the music is truly wonderful, the playing entirely sympathetic and the sound perfectly balanced.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

“[Piano Quintet No 1] ranks among the finest in the genre … a work of astonishing immediacy, at once lyrical and aggressive, that takes you on a lurching emotional journey before achieving stability in the most serene C major imaginable … the performances, by the Goldner String Quartet and pianist Piers Lane, are tremendously authoritative in their combination of technical daring and expressive power” The Guardian

“A fabulous CD this, easily the best recording of Bloch's chamber music in years. The First Quintet, a product of the early 1920s, seems to combine the acerbic drive of middle-period Bartók with the kind of veiled sensuality one associates more with Chausson or Fauré. Bloch's use of quarter-tones, aimed at intensifying the work's already heightened emotional atmosphere, requires careful handling, and the Goldner Quartet make them sound both musically striking and entirely natural. If you need a sampling- point, try the finale's opening, where the sense of urgency will hold you riveted.
The real revelation here is the Second Piano Trio (1957). The language recalls the First Quintet's stronger elements, with tone-rows this time rather than quarter-tones, though again their employment is musical rather than 'political'. Amazing to think that this was Bloch's last chamber work (he was already suffering from cancer when he wrote it), the combination of raw energy and mysticism suggesting the mind of a much younger man, much as Janácek's late chamber music does. The Quintet's quiet coda is rapturously beautiful and the blending of voices between Piers Lane and the Goldners simply could not be bettered. The short quartet bonuses suggest that a Goldner Bloch quartet cycle would be a good idea. But that's one for the future; as for this current release, the music is truly wonderful, the playing entirely sympathetic and the sound perfectly balanced.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

BBC Music Magazine

Disc of the month - February 2008

BBC Music Magazine Awards 2009

Chamber Finalist

Hyperion - CDA67638

(CD)

$14.25

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Victorious Love - Songs by Henry Purcell

Victorious Love - Songs by Henry Purcell


Purcell:

Sweeter than Roses (from Pausanius, the Betrayer of his Country, Z585)

The fatal hour comes on apace, Z421

When first Amintas sued for a kiss, Z430

Plainte - O, Let Me Weep (from The Fairy Queen, Z629)

They tell us that your mighty powers, Z630

Man is for the woman made (from The Mock Marriage, Z605)

From silent shades ('Bess of Bedlam') Z370

Music for a while, Z583

Now the night is chac'd away (from The Fairy Queen, Z629)

If music be the food of love, Z379

Thrice happy lovers (An Epithalamium)

The bashful Thames

I attempt from love's sickness to fly in vain (from The Indian Queen)

O! fair Cedaria, hide those eyes Z402

Fairest Isle (from King Arthur)

O solitude, my sweetest choice, Z406

If love's a sweet passion (from The Fairy Queen, Z628)

Tell me, some pitying angel (The Blessed Virgin's Expostulation), Z196

An Evening Hymn 'Now that the sun hath veiled his light', Z193


Carolyn Sampson (soprano), Laurence Cummings (harpsichord & spinet), Elizabeth Kenny (archlute / theorbo), Anne-Marie Lasla (bass viol), Sarah Sexton (violin I), Andrea Morris (violin II) & Jane Rogers (viola)

“Carolyn Sampson's luminescent soprano, with its easeful enunciation, seemingly instinctive ornamentation, and total lack of self-consciousness captures the bittersweet 'affects' of 'Sweeter than Roses', relishes the shifting tones of voice in the long nocturnal, 'From silent shades', and glows against a single theorbo accompaniment in the great 'Evening Hymn'. The instrumental palette, though limited, is exquisitely tuned to Sampson's voice and to the character of each piece.” BBC Music Magazine, December 2007 ****

“It is immediately obvious from the first few songs that this disc is truly special. Carolyn Sampson's singing is deliciously enjoyable for its sweet tuning, flawless intonation, impeccable stylishness, shapely phrasing of melodic lines and textural awareness.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

“Her tone is extraordinarily beautiful: natural, warm and unforced, with almost superhuman vocal athleticism” American Record Guide

“It is immediately obvious from the first few songs that this disc is truly special. Carolyn Sampson's singing is deliciously enjoyable for its sweet tuning, flawless intonation, impeccable stylishness, shapely phrasing of melodic lines and textual awareness. Each of these 19 songs, mostly taken from Purcell's operas and music for theatre plays, are given judicious performances.
The programme admirably shows the variety of characteristics and styles in Purcell's writing, and Sampson achieves the perfect degree of joyful radiance, seductiveness, witty comment or bittersweet melancholy in each song. 'Sweeter than roses' is an old warhorse for early music singers, but the poetry has seldom seemed so personal as it does in Sampson's heart-rending rendition. The Plaint from TheFairy Queen is beautifully done and the line 'he's gone and I shall never see him more' is remarkable for its stylish precision and emotional truthfulness (the performance is also notable for Sarah Sexton's superb solo violin-playing).
The supporting players always sound as if they are fully interested in the subtle nuances of the music. Well known favourites such as 'Music for a while', 'Fairest isle' and 'I attempt from love's sickness to fly' are excellently done, but several of the relatively obscure songs ('The fatal hour' and 'From silent shades') are shown to be equally rewarding and engaging. First-class new recordings of Purcell's music are much too rare, and this one deserves to be an enormous success.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Penguin Guide

Rosette Winner

Building a Library

Top Recital Recommendation - February 2014

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

BIS - BISSACD1536

(SACD)

$14.25

(also available to download from $10.00)

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Michael Collins and Friends

Michael Collins and Friends


Schubert:

Octet in F major, D803

with Isabelle van Keulen (violin), Peter Brunt (violin), Lars Anders Tomter (viola), Daniel Müller-Schott (cello), Peter Riegelbauer (double bass), Martin Owen (horn), Robin O'Neill (bassoon)

Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, D965 (Von Chezy / Muller)

with Ailish Tynan (soprano), Malcolm Martineau (piano)


Michael Collins (clarinet)

“A hugely enjoyable account of Schubert's Octet.
It is a work lasting an hour, which with its many repeats can easily outstay its welcome despite the freshness of Schubert's invention. But Michael Collins and friends give a performance that is wonderfully resilient and imaginative.
The Octet was commissioned by Count Ferdinand Troyer, steward to the clarinet-playing Archduke Rudolph, and that instrument is most regularly brought to the fore. Michael Collins, the most inspired British clarinettist of his generation, fully brings out the beauty of the writing. Schubert also knew that Ignaz Shuppanzigh, leader of the quartet most closely associated with performing Beethoven's later quartets, was to be the first violin, and he, too, was given the limelight. Isabelle van Keulen is the excellent first violin. Others in the brilliant team include the Norwegian viola-player Lars Tomter, double bass-player Peter Riegelbauer of the Berlin Philharmonic, and Robin O'Neill, first bassoon in the Philharmonia.
It would be hard to devise a more distinguished group, and that is reflected in the freshness of the playing. The Scherzo third movement is wonderfully bouncy and the following Minuet elegant in its phrasing, with a fine spring in the rhythm and nice interplay between clarinet and violin. The finale swaggers along infectiously. In the lovely song with clarinet obbligato, Der Hirtauf dem Felsen, Malcolm Martineau is the sensitive pianist accompanying the bright, fresh soprano of Ailish Tynan. The sense of a live performance in both Octet and song is beautifully caught.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“This is the most enjoyable account of Schubert's Octet I can remember, on disc or in concert. It would be hard to devise a more distinguished group, and that is reflected in the freshness of the playing. The Scherzo third movement is wonderfully bouncy and the following Minuet elegant in its phrasing, with a fine spring in the rhythm and nice interplay between clarinet and violin. The finale swaggers along infectiously. In the lovely song with clarinet obbligato, Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, Malcolm Martineau is the sensitive pianist accompanying the bright, fresh soprano of Ailish Tynan.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

“The spirit of friends relaxing in each other's company is truthfully caught on disc” International Record Review, January 2011

“What a heart! When Collins recapped the adagio theme in a ravishing hush, time and the world stood still” The Times

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Wigmore Hall Live - WHLIVE0017

(CD)

$9.75

(Sorry, download not available in your country)

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Yevgeny Sudbin plays Scriabin

Yevgeny Sudbin plays Scriabin


Scriabin:

Étude Op. 8 No. 12 in D sharp minor

Piano Sonata No. 2 in G sharp minor, Op. 19 'Sonata Fantasy'

Étude Op. 2 No. 1 in C sharp minor

Four Mazurkas, Op. 3

Piano Sonata No. 5 in F sharp major, Op. 53

Nuances, Op. 56 No. 3

Poème for piano, Op. 59 No. 1

Piano Sonata No. 9, Op. 68 'Black Mass'

Waltz in A flat major, Op. 38


“This is music that demands pianism of superlative quality, and here Yevgeny Sudbin miraculously combines the volcanic intensity of Vladimir Horowitz with the cat-and-mouse tonal reflexes of Mikhail Pletnev.” BBC Music Magazine, January 2008 *****

“…no pianist of any generation has, in my experience, captured Scriabin's volatility so vividly as Sudbin. All these performances are flecked with personal touches and brilliances above and beyond even Scriabin's wildest demands. Finally, BIS captures Sudbin's astonishing range of colours and sonorities, ranging from the utmost delicacy to an enraged uproar, in crystalline demonstration sound. This, put suitably euphorically, is a disc in a million.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

“Writing in prose as delirious as his playing, Yevgeny Sudbin speaks in his accompanying nine-page essay of the incomprehension that greeted Scriabin's half-crazed genius in both Russia and the West. This is entirely apt and no pianist of any generation has surely captured Scriabin's volatility so vividly as Sudbin.
In his choice of sonatas (ranging through Scriabin's early, middle and late periods), his mix of drama and introspection are positively alchemic and entirely his own. It is as if the music's very nerve ends are exposed to view and rarely has a pianist been prepared to take such risks on record. He takes virtuosity to the very edge at the end of the Fifth Sonata and his daredevil aplomb is at its height in the Ninth, suitably named Black Mass Sonata.
How he varies the colour, light and shade in the early D sharp minor Etude so that its familiar heroic octaves sound newly minted and never merely frenetic! His selection of Mazurkas is given with a breathtaking subtlety, making you long to hear him in Chopin, while his response to Scriabin's command in the Fifth Sonata, presto tumultuoso esaltato, is like the vortex of a whirlwind. All these performances are flecked with personal touches and brilliances above and beyond even Scriabin's wildest demands.
Finally, BIS captures Sudbin's astonishing range of colours and sonorities, ranging from the utmost delicacy to an enraged uproar, in crystalline demonstration sound. This, put suitably euphorically, is a disc in a million.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“His staccato notes are hair-raising, jutting out violently...,and the climax is terrifying. In the second sonata’s fast movement, Sudbin is ruthless and machine-like in his efficiency - a performance that seems to gobble the notes up. However, Sudbin is not a total wild man, either...His étude Op. 8 No. 12 is all the more powerful for being dynamically rather reserved.” MusicWeb International, 25th February 2014

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

BIS - BISSACD1568

(SACD)

$14.25

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Cerha: Cello Concerto, etc.

Cerha:

Cello Concerto

Schreker:

Chamber Symphony


Heinrich Schiff (violoncello)

Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Peter Eötvös

Friedrich Cerha is best known worldwide as the composer who completed the 3rd act of Alban Berg’s opera Lulu, played universally today in his reconstructed version. Born in 1926, he has always been an independent spirit. Associated early on with the two rival 12-tone schools - Hauer’s and Schoenberg’s - he founded, in 1958, the ensemble “die reihe” which remained under his direction until 1983 and set high standards for the performance of modern music. His Cello Concerto, commissioned by the Wien Modern and Berlin Festivals, employs characteristically unorthodox textures. Heinrich Schiff’s brilliant, energized cello moves swiftly and agilely through ever-changing climates coloured variously by soprano sax, bongos and congas, and organ as well as banks of strings.

“The Austrian composer and conductor Friedrich Cerha's…Cello Concerto, completed in 1996 for Heinrich Schiff, is a work of both substance and originality. Schiff himself is the eloquent soloist ere, casting off reams of golden tone in…work's lyrical central movement and never resorting to coarseness in the more energetic music. Peter Eötvös conducts the Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra in a full-blooded, luxuriant account of Schreker's masterly late-Romantic score...” BBC Music Magazine, January 2008 *****

“ECM has performed another valuable service in releasing a major work by Friedrich Cerha who remains best known for completing the third act of Berg's Lulu. His own music is poorly represented but the Cello Concerto is certainly representative of his recent output. It began life in 1989 as a 'Phantasiestück' that, seven years on, was made the centrepiece of the present three-movement work. And it is this movement, its serene outer sections enclosing a scherzo of limpid delicacy, that makes the strongest impression. Those either side intensify Cerha's combative post- Romanticism, but their rather dutiful alternation between relative dynamism and stasis does not always generate the momentum needed to power the 35-minute whole, for all that dedicatee Heinrich Schiff is effortlessly in command of its interpretative challenges.
Whether or not Cerha occupies a niche corresponding to that of Franz Schreker at the beginning of the 20th century (as Hans-Klaus Jungheinrich's booklet-note seems to imply), his Chamber Symphony (1916) makes an apposite coupling: a work that both reflects the Straussian opulence of his previous operas and anticipates the impressionistic subtlety of those that followed.
Peter Eötvös emphasises the latter and throws the ingenious four-movements-in-one format into constructive relief. With its luminous textures alluringly caught by the superb recording, this is now the version to have and the whole disc offers an unfailingly absorbing listen.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Contemporary Music - up to 25% off

ECM New Series - 4763098

(CD)

Normally: $14.25

Special: $12.11

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Canteloube - Chants d'Auvergne, Volume 2

Canteloube - Chants d'Auvergne, Volume 2


Canteloube:

Songs of the Auvergne (selection)

La Pastourletta è lou chibalie; Lo Fiolairé; Pour l’enfant; Chut, chut; Pastorale; Obal, din lo coumbèlo; Postouro, sé tu m’aymo & Tè, l’co tè; Hé! Beyla-z-y dau fé!

Triptyque

Chants de France (Selection)

Auprès de ma blonde; Où irai-je me plaindre?; Au prè de la rose; Délicieuses cimes; Réveillez-vous! & D’où venez-vous fillette


“In her second volume, including 'Chut, Chut' and 'Lo Fiolairé', Véronique Gens does more than confirm her credentials. The voice is bright, forward, notably clear in diction and lightly responsive to nuance, backed by prominent woodwind and lean strings.” BBC Music Magazine, November 2007 ****

“For her second CD devoted to Joseph Canteloube's vocal music, Véronique Gens has looked beyond the celebrated, much-recorded Chants d'Auvergne, and back to Tryptique, composed in 1913. A setting of three poems by Roger Frêne, its lush, not to say extravagant orchestration anticipates Canteloube's later folksong settings. The first section, "Offrande à l'été" is an ardent love song... The central "Lunaire" has a more mysterious, yearning feel... The finale, "Hymne dans l'aurore" is an ecstatic prayer to Pan, celebrating every wonder of... The final cry, "Mon âme s'ouvre ainsi qu'une aube étincellante! O Pan!" is marked in the score crescendo en grandissant, and Gens, Serge Baudo and the Lille Orchestra rise to the moment with splendid force.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

“For her second CD devoted to Joseph Canteloube's vocal music, Véronique Gens has looked beyond the celebrated, much-recorded Chantsd'Auvergne, and back to Tryptique, composed in 1913. Canteloube dedicated this to Maggie Teyte but the First World War interrupted its progress, and it was not until 1923 that Jane Campredon gave the premiere, with the Colonne orchestra conducted by Gabriel Pierné.
A setting of three poems by Roger Frêne, its lush, not to say extravagant orchestration anticipates Canteloube's later folksong settings. The influence of both Ravel and Debussy is obvious, maybe also Stravinsky (it was, after all, the year of The Rite of Spring). The first section, 'Offrande à l'été' is an ardent love song, with some pretty giddy scoring for harps. The central 'Lunaire' has a more mysterious, yearning feel, with a lovely little dissonance at the word 'cendre', as the poet imagines the leaves turning to ash. The finale, 'Hymne dans l'aurore' is an ecstatic prayer to Pan, celebrating every wonder of nature. The final cry, 'Mon âme s'ouvre ainsi qu'une aube étincellante! O Pan!' is marked in the score crescendo en grandissant, and Gens, Serge Baudo and the Lille orchestra rise to the moment with splendid force. It is really surprising that this work has not become better known; any soprano wanting to look beyond the obvious repertory should welcome it.
The rest of the disc is taken up with those remaining Auvergne songs not included on the earlier issue, conducted by Jean-Claude Casadesus.
Once again, Gens proves that an authentic knowledge of the dialect is a great advantage.
The much later group from Chants de France makes a pleasant end to the recital, but it is Tryptique that has to be heard.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Naxos - 8570338

(CD)

$8.50

(also available to download from $7.00)

This item is currently out of stock at the UK distributor. You may order it now but please be aware that it may be six weeks or more before it can be despatched. (Available now to download.)

Ned Rorem

Ned Rorem


Rorem:

Piano Concerto No. 2 (1951)

Cello Concerto (2002)


Simon Mulligan (piano) & Wen-Sinn Yang (cello)

Royal Scottish National Orchestra, José Serebrier

World Première Recordings

“Simon Mulligan is an outstanding piano soloist, combining precision with a beautiful pearly sound in the upper register. The cellist Weng-Sinn Yang isn't always as tight rhythmically, but makes the most of his many opportunities for lyricism. They're expertly supported by Serebrier, the RSNO, and Naxos's engineering.” BBC Music Magazine, February 2008 ****

“How remarkable that two such delectable concertos should be receiving their world premieres on disc. Unapologetically romantic and accessible, those qualities may well have mitigated against acceptance among the industry's fashion- mongers. The Second Piano Concerto (1951) was written for Julius Katchen and was given its first performance by that superb pianist in 1954. Since then it has lain dormant until its present revival by Simon Mulligan whose brilliance, ideally matched by José Serebrier, is worthy of Katchen himself. Here, the ghosts of Ravel, Françaix, Gershwin, Stravinsky and, most of all, Poulenc, jostle for attention. Yet Rorem's idiom is as personal as it is chic. The final pages of the central 'Quiet and Sad' movement, where the piano weaves intricate tracery round the orchestral theme, may owe much to the Adagioassai from Ravel's G major Concerto but it maintains its own character. The finale, 'Real Fast', is an irresistible tour de force played up to the hilt by Mulligan.
In the Cello Concerto Rorem happily eschews a conventional form, giving programmatic subtitles to each section. These range from 'Curtain Raise' to 'Adrift', offering Wen-Sinn Yang a rich opportunity, whether playing primus inter pares or revelling in Rorem's alternating nostalgia and effervescence. Finely recorded, it's a clear winner.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“The Second Piano Concerto (1951)… has lain dormant until its present revival by Simon Mulligan whose brilliance, ideally matched by José Serebrier, is worthy of Katchen himself. In the Cello Concerto Rorem happily eschews a conventional form… offering Wen-Sinn Yang a rich opportunity, whether playing primus inter pares or revelling in Rorem's alternating nostalgia and effervescence. Finely recorded, it's a clear winner for the Naxos American Classics series.” Gramophone Magazine, December 2007

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - December 2007

Naxos American Classics - 8559315

(CD)

$8.50

(also available to download from $7.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

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