Gramophone Awards 2006

Record of the Year

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Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in A minor 'Tragic'

Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in A minor 'Tragic'


GGramophone Awards 2006

Record of the Year

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - September 2005

DG and Decca Sale

DG - 4775573

(CD)

Normally: $13.00

Special: $7.15

(also available to download from $8.25)

Usually despatched in 8 - 10 working days. (Available now to download.)

Other Finalists

(See below for other Best of Category winners.)

Schubert - Lieder

Schubert - Lieder


Schubert:

Bei dir allein, D866/2

Abendbilder, D650

Himmelsfunken, D651

Dass sie hier gewesen! D775 (Rückert)

Drang in die Ferne, D770

Am Fenster, D878

Auf der Bruck, D853

Des Fischers Liebesgluck, D933 (Leitner)

Der Winterabend (Es ist so still), D938

Das Zugenglocklein D871 (Seidl)

Alinde, D904

Fischerweise, D881 (Schlechta)

Im Abendrot, D799

Der Musensohn, D764 (Goethe)

Du bist die Ruh D776 (Rückert)

Greisengesang, D778

Willkommen und Abschied, D767


Christian Gerhaher (baritone) & Gerold Huber (piano)

“Christian Gerhaher is one of the most exciting German baritones on the Lieder scene at the moment, with his outstanding natural voice, immaculately groomed to enable a powerful musical sculpting of all he sings. …Gerhaher and Huber are at their riveting and rhythmic best in the trotting gait of 'Drang in die Ferne', the canter of 'Auf de Bruck' and the break-neck gallop of 'Wilkommen und Abschied'.” BBC Music Magazine, August 2006 ****

“Eschewing the eccentricities and exaggerations of some of his contemporaries, Gerhaher wonderfully exhibits the verities of Schubert interpretation in this well-planned and absorbing programme. Everything he does evolves from the song in hand and so accords with all that is needed in performing some of the composer's greatest Lieder.
The title, 'Abendbilder', is interpreted freely but almost all the pieces have some relevance to the dreams and moods of evening. Gerhaher enters into these nocturnal moods with unerring artistry where line, tone and word-painting are concerned. He is at his very best in the three settings of Rückert. That quirky, equivocal piece Dass sie hier gewesen, prophesying the style and harmony of Hugo Wolf, is sung with a full understanding of its inner meaning. Du bist dieRuh is delivered with the fine line and intense concentration such a great song deserves, and the thoughts of an elderly man in Greisengesang are as meaningful as they should be.
Highly appealing throughout is the mellifluousness and breath control, a feature prominent throughout the recital, of the quietly contemplative Im Abendrot, and the appropriate dreaminess brought to the hypnotic barcarolle that is Des Fischers Liebesglück. As a nice contrast, Gerhaher brings virile energy to the fierce riding of Auf der Bruck – and here Gerold Huber deserves as much praise as his partner for portraying the insistent beat of horse's hooves in the piano part so vividly – and the familiar Der Musensohn has just the right verve as does another Goethe setting, the ecstatic Willkommen und Abschied, that brings a rewarding recital to an exhilarating close with Huber – as throughout – seconding the singer with his discerning contribution. The recording is ideally balanced.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“Gerhaher enters into these nocturnal moods with unerring artistry where line, tone and word-painting are concerned. He is at his very best in the three settings of Rückert. Du bist die Ruh is delivered with the fine line and intense concentration such a great song deserves, and the thoughts of an elderly man in Greisengesang are as meaningful as they should be. ...Gerhaher brings virile energy to the fierce riding of Auf der Bruck - and here Gerold Huber deserves as much praise as his partner for portraying the insistent beat of horse's hooves in the piano part so vividly and the familiar Der Musensohn has just the right verve as does another Goethe setting, the ecstatic Willkommen and Abschied, that brings a rewarding recital to an exhilarating close with Huber - as throughout - seconding the singer with his discerning contribution.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2006

GGramophone Awards 2006

Record of the Year Finalist

GGramophone Awards 2006

Winner - Vocal

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - July 2006

RCA - 82876777162

(CD)

$8.75

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Lindberg, M: Clarinet Concerto, etc.

Lindberg, M:

Clarinet Concerto

Gran Duo

Chorale


(World première recording)

“Lindberg composed his Clarinet Quintet for Kriikku in 1992, and it is hard to imagine that this fabulously attractive work would ever have appeared without him to play it so brilliantly.” The Guardian Classical CD of the Week*****

“The clarinet has featured prominently as a solo instrument in Magnus Lindberg's output throughout his career, though it was only in 2002 that he set about writing a concerto for his longtime colleague Kari Kriikku. The finished article, however, is really very different from 1980s pieces such as Ablauf and Linea d'ombra.
Running for 25 minutes, the work's four sections play continuously, if not seamlessly. Beautifully written for the instrument, there are hints of Debussy in the opening pages and – in the orchestration – of Barber and Copland later on, but the Concerto is in no way derivative. It proceeds with ineluctable momentum through a varied tonal landscape (including some decidedly jazz-like passages) to an ecstatic peroration that is deeply moving and uplifting, before closing out serenely: Rautavaara meeting Gershwin, perhaps.
There is something of Rautavaara's manner in the modest Chorale (2001-2), written to precede Berg's Violin Concerto (both use the chorale Esist genug). The larger Gran Duo for winds and brass (1999), with its suggestions of Stravinsky's Symphonies of Wind Instruments, is utterly different though no less impressive. The duo is between the woodwinds and brass en masse, the work a bracing dialogue across some 20 minutes with fascinating incidents along the way, not least where the textures pare down to chamber proportions, though the dark-hued coda has considerable cumulative power. Very strongly recommended.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“Magnus Lindberg's Clarinet Concerto has enjoyed phenomenal success since its 2002 premiere… A marvellous vehicle for the amazing virtuosity of clarinettist Kari Krikku, this is a shiny, sophisticated, nostalgic cultural artefact, indubitably contemporary in language yet sensuously easy (tuneful, even) on the ear. ...is a stunning disc.” BBC Music Magazine, September 2005 *****

Presto Disc of the Week

27th October 2008

GGramophone Awards 2006

Record of the Year Finalist

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - October 2005

Ondine - ODE10382

(CD)

$14.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

 Other Best of Category Winners

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte, K620

Mozart: Die Zauberflöte, K620


René Pape (Sarastro), Erika Miklósa (Königin der Nacht), Dorothea Röschmann (Pamina), Christoph Strehl (Tamino), Hanno Müller-Brachmann (Papageno), Julia Kleiter (Papagena), Georg Zeppenfeld (Sprecher), Kurt Azesberger (Monostatos), Caroline Stein (Erste Dame), Heidi Zehnder (Zweite Dame), Anne-Carolyn Schlüter (Dritte Dame), Alexander Lischke (Drei Knaben), Frederic Jost, Niklas Mallmann (Soloists From Tölzer Knabenchor), Danilo Formaggia (Erster Geharnischter Mann), Sascha Borris (Zweiter Geharnischter Mann), Andreas Bauer (Erster Priester), Danilo Formaggia (Zweiter Priester), Tobias Beyer (Dritter Priester), Matthias Bernhold (Drei Sklaven), Martin Olbertz & Tobias Beyer

Mahler Chamber Orchestra & Arnold Schoenberg Chor, Claudio Abbado

“This is certainly the most desirable version using modern instruments to appear since Solti's second recording in 1990. That said, its characteristics are rather nearer William Christie's 1995 period-performance (reviewed above).
Abbado undertook the opera for the first time in performances in Italy in 2005, directed by his son (the production was seen at the 2006 Edinburgh Festival). On this occasion, he conducts a direct, keenly articulated, inspiriting account of the score, obviously aware of what has been achieved in recent times by the authenticists, yet when he reaches the work at its most Masonic – the Act 2 trio and the scene with the Armed Men, Tamino and Pamina – Abbado, directing his beloved Mahler Chamber Orchestra, gives the music its true and wondrous import. The playing throughout is alert and scrupulously articulated.
Casts varied between performances; here Abbado assembled one predominantly chosen from a youngish generation of German-speaking singers, each of whom approaches his or her role with fresh sound and interprets it in impeccably Mozartian style. The Tamino and Pamina are well nigh faultless. Tamino has been taken by many outstanding tenors on disc but Christoph Strehl sings with a Wunderlich-like strength and beauty, and rather more light and shade than his famous predecessor brought to the role. His is a wonderfully virile, vital reading that gives pleasure to the ear, as much in ensemble as in aria. He is partnered by Dorothea Röschmann, who has already appeared as Pamina at Covent Garden, and in many other houses. Her full-throated, positive singing, finely shaped, cleanly articulated, is a true match for Strehl's.
Hanno Müller-Brachmann is a properly lively and amusing Papageno, and delivers the role in a richer bass-baritone than many interpreters provide. He doesn't attempt a Viennese accent in the dialogue (a fairly full version), but brings plenty of simple humour to the part. The high and low roles are well catered for. The Hungarian coloratura Erika Miklósa has been making a speciality of Queen of Night over the past few years and shows just why in a technically secure and fiery account of her two arias. René Pape sings Sarastro: now at the peak of his career, he conveys all the role's gravity and dignity in a gloriously sung performance. Kurt Azesberger is a suitably nasty Monostatos.
Abbado allows a few neatly executed decorations.
The extensive dialogue, spoken in a manner suitable for the theatre, sometimes sounds over-emphatic in the home, with the Papagena as an old woman the worst culprit. The recording is reasonably well balanced. As a whole the performance conveys a welcome immediacy and spontaneity and the daring of Abbado's way with the score is very alluring.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“...a triumphant success. René Pape's magnificent Sarastro dominates the opera, just as intended...But most magical of all are the little vocal ensembles, wonderfully warm and refined...this is above all an affectionately relaxed performance, with Abbado continually revelling in the lyrical beauty of Mozart's wonderful score.” Penguin Guide, 2010 ****

“Abbado… conducts a direct, keenly articulated, inspiriting account of the score… The playing throughout is alert and scrupulously articulated. The Tamino and Pamina are well nigh faultless. …Christoph Strehl… sings with a Wunderlich-like strength and beauty... He is partnered by Dorothea Röschmann... Her full-throated, positive singing, finely shaped, cleanly articulated, is a true match for Strehl's. Hanno Müller-Brachmann is a properly lively and amusing Papageno... René Pape sings Sarastro: now at the peak of his career, he conveys all the role's gravity and dignity in a gloriously sung performance.” Gramophone Magazine, June 2006

GGramophone Awards 2006

Best of Category

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - June 2006

Penguin Guide

Rosette Winner

CD Review

Critics Disc of the Year - December 2006

BBC Music Magazine

Disc of the month - June 2006

DG - 4775789

(CD - 2 discs)

$25.75

(also available to download from $16.75)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Handel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto

Handel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto

Recorded live at the Glyndebourne Opera House, East Sussex, on 14th & 17th August 2005.


Sarah Connolly (Cesare), Danielle de Niese (Cleopatra), Angelika Kirchschlager (Sesto), Christophe Dumaux (Tolomeo), Patricia Bardon (Cornelia), Christopher Maltman (Achilla) & Rachid Ben Abdeslam (Nireno)

The Glyndebourne Chorus & Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, William Christie (conductor) & David McVicar (stage director)

Note: This Blu-ray Disc (BD) is not compatible with standard DVD players

David McVicar’s production of Giulio Cesare manages to combine serious insight with entertainment, bringing Handel’s masterpiece to life in a powerful, convincing and highly intelligent way. In every line of the complex narrative the subtle nuances are apparent, reflecting perfectly the transparent and exquisite nature of Handel’s musical expression. Filmed in High Definition and recorded in true surround sound, the outstanding singing of the all-star cast, led by a superb Sarah Connolly, and the vivid playing of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment under the energising baton of William Christie reveal the colour and dramatic character of Handel’s music in a most delightful manner.

‘…a production with performances to savour, led from the pit by William Christie and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment on stylish form. Sarah Connolly… gave a ‘complete’ performance full of intelligence and subtlety. Danielle de Niese stole the show as a wily, fun-filled sex kitten who renders men helpless with her irresistible charms.’ Opera Now

Bonus material/features:

Illustrated synopsis & cast gallery.

Entertainment is not a Dirty Word - documentary including interviews with William Christie, David McVicar and the cast.

Danielle de Niese & the Glyndebourne experience - an informal portrait of Danielle de Niese in her first-ever Glyndebourne season.

Production photo gallery & rehearsals photo gallery.

PICTURE FORMAT: 1080i
LENGTH: Approx 305 Mins
SOUND: 5.0 & 2.0 PCM
SUBTITLES: EN/FR/DE/ES/IT

“David McVicar's 2005 staging, revived the following summer, provoked a deal of contrasting views among the critical fraternity but was adored by the Glyndebourne public. Chief cause of their delight was the overtly sexual, high-hoofing performance of Cleopatra by the irrepressible Danielle de Niese (who is accorded a delightful 22-minute narrative on her Glyndebourne experience among the extras here). Her vocal command and stage presence are spectacular in every sense, and from her first aria she utterly seduces her audience. McVicar took advantage of her attractive skills to build the opera around her personality. We are here in the high noon of British imperialism and the Ottoman Empire, with Caesar more like a late-19th-century English general than a Roman emperor, and with the Egyptian milieu heavily underlined by milling extras, now always a not-altogether welcome feature of a McVicar production. They clutter the stage and draw attention away from the principals, although one has to admit that the highly disciplined and often captivating choreography is brilliantly executed within Robert Jones's exotic sets. McVicar does at least allow the moments of serious drama to be played out without undue interference – such as the deeply moving duet that closes Act 1 and Cleopatra's 'Piangerò'. Finally it has to be said that only Glyndebourne allows for the rehearsal time to prepare such a complex and ingenious staging. The musical side of things is equally well prepared and thought-through under William Christie's knowledgeable and commanding direction. He manages to balance with the same finesse and care the light and serious parts of the score, even if his love for Handel leads him to a few self-indulgently slow tempi. The OAE play lovingly and with period skills for him. By the time of this DVD recording, near the end of the run, the whole thing moves with eloquence matched by elegance. De Niese sings her airy numbers as to the manner born, seconded by expertly erotic dancing. She manages most of the emotional substance of her sadder arias, but they sometimes seem wanting in the tonal weight ideally required. Sarah Connolly's thoroughly believable Caesar is sung with her firm tone and well schooled mastery of Handelian style, including subtle embellishments. This wilful and imperial Caesar manages to change moods as his music demands. Some of the most accomplished and tender Handelian singing comes from Patricia Bardon's moving Cornelia and Angelika Kirchschlager's concerned Sesto, although the latter does slightly overplay the character's seemingly neurotic state of mind following his father's brutal death. The young countertenor Christophe Dumaux playing Tolomeo is suitably brat-like and spoilt. He, like most of the cast, fulfils all the stringent demands of this very physical staging. Christopher Maltman makes Achilles as nasty as he should be. The sense of teamwork all round is confirmed in the interviews included in the extras. Robin Lough's DVD direction is faultless.” Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“Justly garlanded with awards aplenty, David McVicar's 2005 Glyndebourne production offers a witty, imaginative post-colonial take on Handel's best-known opera. Sarah Connolly is the definitive Caesar, whilst Danielle de Niese's high-glamour, all-singing-all-dancing Cleopatra catapulted her to stardom. William Christie directs with his customary energy and insight in the pit.” Katherine Cooper, Presto Classical, August 2014

“an account at once scholarly, lively and refreshing...Sarah Connolly sings superbly in the title-role, looking very boyish...Patricia Bardon is an excellent Cornelia and Christophe Dumaux a characterful Tolomeo” Penguin Guide, 2010 ***

GGramophone Awards 2006

Best of Category

GGramophone Magazine

DVD of the Month

BBC Music Magazine

DVD Choice - June 2006

BBC Music Magazine Awards 2007

DVD of the Year

Blu-ray Disc

Region: all

Opus Arte Glyndebourne - OABD7024D

(Blu-ray - 2 discs)

$38.50

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

Handel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto

Handel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto

Recorded live at the Glyndebourne Opera House, East Sussex, on 14th & 17th August 2005.


Sarah Connolly (Cesare), Danielle de Niese (Cleopatra), Angelika Kirchschlager (Sesto), Christophe Dumaux (Tolomeo), Patricia Bardon (Cornelia), Christopher Maltman (Achilla) & Rachid Ben Abdeslam (Nireno)

The Glyndebourne Chorus & Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, William Christie (conductor) & David McVicar (stage director)

David McVicar’s production of Giulio Cesare manages to combine serious insight with entertainment, bringing Handel’s masterpiece to life in a powerful, convincing and highly intelligent way. In every line of the complex narrative the subtle nuances are apparent, reflecting perfectly the transparent and exquisite nature of Handel’s musical expression. Filmed in High Definition and recorded in true surround sound, the outstanding singing of the all-star cast, led by a superb Sarah Connolly, and the vivid playing of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment under the energising baton of William Christie reveal the colour and dramatic character of Handel’s music in a most delightful manner.

‘…a production with performances to savour, led from the pit by William Christie and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment on stylish form. Sarah Connolly… gave a ‘complete’ performance full of intelligence and subtlety. Danielle de Niese stole the show as a wily, fun-filled sex kitten who renders men helpless with her irresistible charms.’ Opera Now

Specials:

"Entertainment is not a Dirty Word" - documentary about the opera including interviews with William Christie, David McVicar and the cast.

"Danielle de Niese & the Glyndebourne experience" - an informal portrait of Danielle de Niese in her first-ever Glyndebourne season.

PICTURE FORMAT: 16:9

LENGTH: 295 Mins

SOUND: DTS SURROUND / LPCM STEREO

SUBTITLES: EN/FR/DE/ES/IT

“David McVicar's 2005 staging, revived the following summer, provoked a deal of contrasting views among the critical fraternity but was adored by the Glyndebourne public. Chief cause of their delight was the overtly sexual, high-hoofing performance of Cleopatra by the irrepressible Danielle de Niese (who is accorded a delightful 22-minute narrative on her Glyndebourne experience among the extras here). Her vocal command and stage presence are spectacular in every sense, and from her first aria she utterly seduces her audience.
McVicar took advantage of her attractive skills to build the opera around her personality.
We are here in the high noon of British imperialism and the Ottoman Empire, with Caesar more like a late-19th-century English general than a Roman emperor, and with the Egyptian milieu heavily underlined by milling extras, now always a not-altogether welcome feature of a McVicar production. They clutter the stage and draw attention away from the principals, although one has to admit that the highly disciplined and often captivating choreography is brilliantly executed within Robert Jones's exotic sets. McVicar does at least allow the moments of serious drama to be played out without undue interference – such as the deeply moving duet that closes Act 1 and Cleopatra's 'Piangerò'.
Finally it has to be said that only Glyndebourne allows for the rehearsal time to prepare such a complex and ingenious staging.
The musical side of things is equally well prepared and thought-through under William Christie's knowledgeable and commanding direction. He manages to balance with the same finesse and care the light and serious parts of the score, even if his love for Handel leads him to a few self-indulgently slow tempi. The OAE play lovingly and with period skills for him. By the time of this DVD recording, near the end of the run, the whole thing moves with eloquence matched by elegance.
De Niese sings her airy numbers as to the manner born, seconded by expertly erotic dancing.
She manages most of the emotional substance of her sadder arias, but they sometimes seem wanting in the tonal weight ideally required. Sarah Connolly's thoroughly believable Caesar is sung with her firm tone and well schooled mastery of Handelian style, including subtle embellishments.
This wilful and imperial Caesar manages to change moods as his music demands.
Some of the most accomplished and tender Handelian singing comes from Patricia Bardon's moving Cornelia and Angelika Kirchschlager's concerned Sesto, although the latter does slightly overplay the character's seemingly neurotic state of mind following his father's brutal death. The young countertenor Christophe Dumaux playing Tolomeo is suitably brat-like and spoilt. He, like most of the cast, fulfils all the stringent demands of this very physical staging. Christopher Maltman makes Achilles as nasty as he should be. The sense of teamwork all round is confirmed in the interviews included in the extras. Robin Lough's DVD direction is faultless.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“an account at once scholarly, lively and refreshing...Sarah Connolly sings superbly in the title-role, looking very boyish...Patricia Bardon is an excellent Cornelia and Christophe Dumaux a characterful Tolomeo.” Penguin Guide, 2010 ***

“…a runaway success at Glyndebourne is turned into a great DVD. David McVicar's 2005 staging… was adored by the Glyndebourne public. Chief cause of their delight was the overtly sexual, high-hoofing performance of Cleopatra by the irrepressible Danielle de Niese... Her vocal command and stage presence are spectacular in every sense, and from her first aria she utterly seduces her audience. McVicar took... William Christie... manages to balance with the same finesse and care the light and serious parts of the score... Sarah Connolly's thoroughly believable Caesar is sung with her firm tone and well schooled mastery of Handelian style, including subtle embellishments. Some of the most accomplished and tender Handelian singing comes from Patricia Bardon's moving Cornelia and Angelika Kirchschlager's concerned Sesto... The young countertenor Christophe Dumaux playing Tolomeo is suitably brat-like and spoilt. He, like most of the cast, fulfils all the stringent demands of this very physical staging. Christopher Maltman makes Achilles as nasty as he should be. The sense of teamwork all round is confirmed in the interviews included in the extras. Robin Lough's DVD direction is faultless.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2006

“Justly garlanded with awards aplenty, David McVicar's 2005 Glyndebourne production offers a witty, imaginative post-colonial take on Handel's best-known opera. Sarah Connolly is the definitive Caesar, whilst Danielle de Niese's high-glamour, all-singing-all-dancing Cleopatra catapulted her to stardom. William Christie directs with his customary energy and insight in the pit.” Katherine Cooper, Presto Classical, August 2014

GGramophone Awards 2006

Best of Category

GGramophone Magazine

DVD of the Month - July 2006

BBC Music Magazine

DVD Choice - June 2006

BBC Music Magazine Awards 2007

DVD of the Year

DVD Video

Region: 0

Format: NTSC

Opus Arte Glyndebourne - OA0950D

(DVD Video - 3 discs)

$38.50

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

Editor's Choice Award

Stanford: Songs of the Sea, Op. 91, etc.

Stanford:

Songs of the Sea, Op. 91

The Revenge: A Ballad of the Fleet

Songs of the Fleet


Gerald Finley (baritone)

BBC National Chorus of Wales & BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Richard Hickox

“Songs of the Sea - which includes the long-popular 'Drake's Drum' and 'The Old Superb' - and the later, texturally richer and more thoughtful Songs of the Fleet are superb baritone vehicles for Gerald Finley… this new Chandos SACD… has impressive presence.” BBC Music Magazine, July 2006 ****

“Two of Stanford's catchiest and most popular settings frame his 1904 Songs ofthe Sea for baritone, male chorus and orchestra: both 'Drake's Drum' and 'The Old Superb' are instantly memorable and have alone justly secured the work's survival. But there's some terrific music tucked away in the three remaining numbers, not least the marvellously serene 'Homeward Bound' with its burnished orchestral palette (Stanford's skilful scoring gives enormous pleasure throughout, in fact), rapt eloquence (nowhere more potent than at the line 'Swiftly the great ship glides') and adventurous harmonic scope.
Six years later, Stanford returned to Henry Newbolt's maritime verse to pen a more reflective sequel entitled Songs of the Fleet. Its spacious centrepiece, 'The Middle Watch', evokes a dusky mystery and sense of awe, while the opening 'Sailing at Dawn' is a gloriously assured and noble essay worthy of Elgar himself...Not so immediately appealing is the 1886 choral ballad The Revenge, one of the composer's biggest early successes. Tennyson's poem depicts how Sir Richard Grenville and his Devonian crew aboard Revenge took on – and inflicted terrible damage upon – the Spanish fleet off the Azores in 1591 (one ship against 53 – believe it or not!).
Stanford's breezy setting proved a hit with Victorian choral societies up and down the land.
Though no forgotten masterpiece, it's most ably served by Hickox and company. Throw in an admirable booklet-essay by Jeremy Dibble and ripe, airy sound from Chandos, and it certainly adds up to a hearty recommendation.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“…Gerald Finley's firmly focused, ringing tone is a joy. He doesn't possess the salty tang of Benjamin Luxon (a true sea-dog if ever I heard one), but the voice is steadier and he sings with unfailing ardour, intelligence and sensitivity. Hickox and his BBC Welsh forces provide exemplary support.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2006

GGramophone Awards 2006

Winner - Editor's Choice

GGramophone Magazine

Disc of the Month - July 2006

Penguin Guide

Rosette Winner

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

Chandos - CHSA5043

(SACD)

$14.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

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