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Pilati: Chamber Music For Violin, Cello & Piano

Pilati: Chamber Music For Violin, Cello & Piano


Pilati:

Sonata in F minor for violin and piano

Preludio, Aria e Tarantella

Folk tunes

Suite for Strings and Piano: Sarabanda

Pezzi (2) for violin and piano

Caccia for violin and piano

Echoes of Napels: Tammurriata

Sonata in A minor for cello and piano

Inquiétude - Melodic Etude for cello and piano

Bagatelles


Francesco Manara (violin), Luca Signorini (cello) & Dario Candela (piano)

Mario Pilati (1903-1938) was an important figure in Italian musical life in the 20-ties and 30-ties of the 20th century. After winning the prestigious Coolidge Prize his works were also performed in the USA, a.o. by the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Koussevitsky.

Pilati’s style has its roots in the Late-Romantic language of Mahler and Richard Strauss. His compatriot Respighi’s influence is shown in his fondness for modal writing, whereas also neo-classical inspirations can be traced.

This 2CD set contains Pilati’s complete output for violin and piano and cello and piano. Prominent is the substantial and brooding Violin Sonata in F minor, the Cello Sonata in A minor and lighter fare such as the Bagatelles for piano.

Played with dedication and obvious love for the music by 3 italian musicians: Francesco Manara (violin), Luca Signorini (cello) and pianist Dario Candela.

The booklet contains an extensive composer portrait as well as commentary on the works written by Laura Esposito Pilati.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95352BR

(CD - 2 discs)

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Durante: Concertos For Strings

Durante: Concertos For Strings


Durante, F:

Concerto No. 1 in F minor

Concerto No. 2 in G minor

Concerto No. 3 in E flat major

Concerto No. 4 in E minor

Concerto No. 5 in A major

Concerto No. 6 in A major

Concerto No. 7 in C major

Concerto No. 8 in A major “La Pazzia”


Ensemble Imaginaire, Cristina Corrieri

Francesco Durante (1684-1755) was the most important representative of the Neapolitan School in the first half of the 18-th century, “the greatest harmonist in Italy, that is the world” wrote Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his Dictionnaire de Musique. His pupils include Pergolesi, Jommelli and Paisiello.

Although Durante was foremost a composer of sacred music he is widely known for his famous 12 Concertos for Strings. These 3- or 4-movement concertos are highly skillful works in which the Baroque polyphony is infused with Neapolitan Galante Style elements, as well as certain unusual melodic, rhythmic and harmonic twists, foreshadowing the Sturm und Drang style.

The Italian Ensemble Imaginaire is specialized in the exploration of Neapolitan Baroque music. They play on period instruments and have based their performance on a new critical survey of the original manuscript scores.

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Brilliant Classics - 95542BR

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Campion: Music For Baroque Guitar

Campion: Music For Baroque Guitar


Campion, F:

Gavotte en Rondeau

Préludes

Fugues

La Montléon - Courante la Victoire

Allemande

Les soupirs

Sarabande Rondeau

Gigue la Somptueuse

Les Ramages

Tombeau Rondeau

Tombeau de Mr. De Maltot

Air

Passacaille


Bernhard Hofstötter (guitar)

François Campion was born around 1685 in Rouen, France. In 1705 his “Nouvelles Découvertes Sur la Guitarre” was published in Paris. With this work Campion positioned himself, with Robert de Visée, as one of the finest representatives of the French guitar at the close of the 17th century.

In his works Campion firmly establishes the guitar as a polyphonic instrument capable of producing complex harmonies and counterpoint, which is shown in the 4 complete fugues on this recording. The other works feature popular dance forms of the time: allemande, courante, sarabande and gigue, expressing the full range of French charm, grace and brilliance.

Austrian lutenist and guitarist Bernhard Hofstötter plays a unique historical guitar built around 1640 by the famous instrument maker Matteo Sellas.

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Brilliant Classics - 95276BR

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$8.00

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Fux: Complete Music For Harpsichord

Fux: Complete Music For Harpsichord


Filippo Emanuele Ravizza (harpsichord)

Johann Joseph Fux (1660-1741) overcame his humble origins as son of peasant farmers brilliantly, eventually holding the prestigious post of Kapellmeister at the Hapsburg Court in Vienna for over 30 years, serving 3 Emperors in a row, all of whom were in the possession of a passion for music.

This new recording contains Fux’ complete works for harpsichord: the 5 Partitas, a Capriccio and several miscellaneous works. His style is a perfect blend of French and German keyboard style: French in its elaborate ornamentation, elegance and brilliance, German in the strict counterpoint. Fux is also the author of “Gradus ad Parnassum”, the monumental treatise on counterpoint which became a point of reference for many generations to come. Harpsichordist Filippo Ravizza plays on a copy made by Luca Vismara of a magnificent Dulcken harpsichord, built in the Flemish tradition and kept in the Smithonian Institute in Washington.

Excellent liner notes written by the artist in both English and Italian, as well as information on the instrument.

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Brilliant Classics - 95189BR

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Petrucci: Intavolature Di Liuto, Spinacino, Dalza, Bossinensis

Petrucci: Intavolature Di Liuto, Spinacino, Dalza, Bossinensis


Sandro Volta (renaissance lute)

The historical significance of Ottaviano Petrucci (1466-1538) lies in the fact that he was the first to print a book of polyphony with movable type, and he was one of the first to print sheet music using the same technique. His first editions of Intavolature di Liuto (lute tablatures) included works by Francesco Spinacino, Joan Dalza and Franciscus Bossinensis, all featured on this CD.

In his Recercars Spinacino achieves a remarkable variety in the handling of the musical form, skilfully incorporating dance motifs in the arrangement of the vocal lines.

Sandro Volta is a highly regarded lute and guitar player, specialising in the performance of Renaissance and Baroque works for his instrument. In 1994 he won the prestigious Grand Prix du Disque. His recordings for Brilliant Classics include works by Marco dall’Aquila and Francesco da Milano, highly praised in the musical press: “played with great mastery and expression” (Philippe Zanoly).

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95262BR

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Boccherini: String Trios Op. 6

Boccherini: String Trios Op. 6


Boccherini:

String Trio No. 4 in F Major, G. 92

String Trio No. 2 in E-flat major

Trio, Op. 6 No. 5 (G93) in G minor

String Trio No. 6 in C Major, G. 94


Lubotsky Trio

Firstly, this album represents a welcome return to the studio, and the recording catalogues, of the Russian violinist Mark Lubotsky. In English-speaking countries, Lubotsky is renowned as the soloist on Britten’s Decca recording of the Violin Concerto: a performance of idiomatic sweep which fully bears out the composer’s claim that ‘this is the performance I have been waiting for.’ He worked with all the great Russian conductors of his generation such as Kondrashin, Svetlanov and Rozhdestvensky. Throughout his career he has played and advocated the music of our time: most notably that of his fellow student at the Moscow Conservatoire, Alfred Schnittke, who dedicated both the Second Violin Concerto and three violin sonatas to him.

However, this focus on new music should not overshadow Lubotsky’s mastery of the classical repertoire. This particular disposition of the ‘Lubotsky Trio’ features the Swedish violinist Katarina Andreasson, though Lubotsky and the cellist Olga Dowbusch-Lubotsky have also played and recorded Taneyev in the more traditional string trio line-up with the violists Ferdinand Erblich and Vladimir Botchkovsky, and also as a piano trio, where they have been partnered by Schnittke’s widow Irina.

The String Trios Op.6 were published in 1769. After his Opp. 1 and 4 sets, they represent Boccherini’s third attempt in as many years to take forward the genre of the Baroque trio sonata. He went on to write another four sets of string trios, all of which are better known and more frequently encountered on record than Op.6, which makes this new recording all the more desirable for the connoisseur of Classical-era chamber music.

No less than the later sets, the Op.6 trios are characterized by a richness of melodic language, virtuosic brilliance and elegance, which nevertheless contains moments of high expression such as the chromatic Adagio which opens the G minor Trio, No.5 in the set. The sound of the two violins and cello in its fullness often approaches to that of the string quartet. Listening to these masterpieces, it is impossible not to notice the indubitable impact of his music on the great Viennese classics, first of all on Mozart.

Luigi Boccherini was one of the most famous cellists of his day, travelling Europe as a touring virtuoso. On his return to his native Lucca he founded the first professional string quartet in history.

Boccherini’s output for string ensembles is vast: he wrote more than 120 string quartets, 100 string quintets (with two cellos) and 48 string trios.

The string trios Op. 6 are for 2 violins and cello, highly expressive music full of rich classical melodies, elegance and instrumental brilliance.

Excellent performances by the Lubotsky Trio, with the eminent Russian violinist Mark Lubotsky, a pupil of David Oistrakh, as primarius.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95493BR

(CD)

$8.00

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Kabalevsky: Piano Sonata No.3 & 24 Preludes

Kabalevsky: Piano Sonata No.3 & 24 Preludes


Kabalevsky:

Piano Sonata No. 3 in F major, Op. 46

24 Preludes Op. 38


Pietro Bonfilio (piano)

Once considered in the same breath as Prokofiev and Shostakovich, Kabalevsky’s star has waned somewhat (the same fate has befallen both Myaskovsky and Khachaturian), both in his native Russia and farther West, where he is primarily remembered for his exuberant orchestral potboiler, the overture he wrote to an opera on a Romain Rolland story, Colas Breugnon. The opera won both a Lenin Prize and Rolland’s approval – no small feat – but has been completely forgotten. However, the offbeat rhythms that made the overture an instant hit also lend an upbeat, funky character to the opening movement of the Third Piano Sonata.

Kabalevsky wrote the sonata in 1948, shortly after the premiere of another opera, Taras and his Family, based on the same gory narrative which inspired Janáček’s orchestral fantasy, Taras Bulba. ‘Excellent music (much Prokofiev),’ wrote Myaskovsky in his diary, ‘but the libretto is dreadful.’ The composer may have taken note, for although the opera was not revived, he used several of its themes in the sonata. Sweet playfulness and calm characterize the first theme, the gliding movement of the waltz in the second, and a spirit of youthful fanfare in the finale.

The 24 Preludes were composed in 1943 and dedicated to Myaskovsky. Kabalevsky had lately (like Shostakovich) been in siege-ridden Leningrad, and the wartime mood may have contributed to the patriotic flavour of the Preludes: each one uses a theme from folk-music collections of Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev and Liadov. Their first performer was the Russian virtuoso Yakov Flier, who was sufficiently convinced of their merits to include them in his international tours. ‘They are not mere transcriptions of the songs’, he declared, ‘but new, original works of great cohesion, a cycle in which each part has a meaning of its own. Each Prelude expresses a particular mood and significance… It is one of Kabalevsky’s most profound and successful works.’

Compared to works of political expediency such as the Song of the Party Membership Card from 1956, Flier was doubtless right.

During his lifetime Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987) was considered by the authorities to be one of the Top 5 composers of Russia, on a par with Prokofiev and Shostakovich. He was praised for his formalism, general popular style and patriotism. He was not a revolutionary, and this caused his fame to decline after the collapse of the Soviet Union. His music however has a strong identity, vigorous, alternating power with lyricism, and rooted in the rich folklore of Russia.

This new recording contains his effervescent 3rd Piano Sonata and the complete 24 Preludes Op. 38, written during World War II, each based on a Russian folk song, presenting a wide variety of moods, from the pensive melancholy to fiery passion.

Played by the highly talented young Italian pianist Pietro Bonfilio, who expresses his love for the Russian culture with this beautiful recording.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95256BR

(CD)

$8.00

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Gnattali: 4 Concertinos for Guitar and Orchestra

Gnattali: 4 Concertinos for Guitar and Orchestra


Gnattali:

Guitar Concertino No. 1

Guitar Concertino No. 2

Guitar Concertino No. 3

Guitar Concertino No. 4


Marco Salcito (guitar)

Orchestra Sinfonica Abruzzese, Marcello Bufalini

Brazilian composers already feature in the extensive library of guitar music on Brilliant Classics: not only the obvious name of Villa-Lobos (BC9196) but on a more diverse survey by Flavio Apro (BC94810), including lesser-known names such as João Pernambuco and Egberto Gismonti whose work also fused traditional Brazilian genres with elements of jazz, classical, world and contemporary music.

To their names may now be added Radamés Gnattali (1906-1988). Having composed much music of a consciously national flavour in the early part of his career, emulating Villa-Lobos, he sought a broader appeal during the 1950s with works such as these four guitar concertinos, dating between 1951 and 1967, which use neo-Romantic and neo-classical moulds while maintaining the light style often associated with symphonic jazz. The tricky balance between guitar and orchestra is skilfully

handled by means of dialogue and contrast, investing the structure of each work with a degree of intimacy more usually associated with chamber music.

The Second Concertino was written for Aníbal August Sardinha, known as Garoto, one of the creators of the bossa nova sound. Even though the concerto clearly reflects the guitarist’s manner of playing, the first movement also reveals the influence of American composers such as Bernstein and Gershwin, the third that of the new trends in symphonic and progressive rock music, with its pressing patterns, while the second embodies something of the melancholy typical of the bossa redolent of saudade. The Third is scored for an unusual ensemble of guitar, flute, timpani and strings, in which the flute also has a soloistic part; the Fourth returns to a string-only ensemble for accompaniment.

These premiere recordings are the work of Marco Salcito, who returned to Gnattali’s original manuscripts to edit the scores afresh; all guitar-music enthusiasts will be keen to hear his work.

Nikolay First recording of the complete Concertinos for guitar and orchestra by Radamés Gnattali.

Radamés Gnattali (1906-1988), son of Italian immigrants, is one of the most popular and famous composers of his native Brazil, where he is mentioned in the same breath as Villa-Lobos. His music is the perfect fusion of the high and the low, of formally structured classical music and the vibrant multi-coloured folk culture of Brazil.

The 4 Concertinos for guitar and orchestra are medium-sized, 3-movement works, highly entertaining and brimming with good tunes, groovy rhythms and brilliant instrumentation: a real discovery!

Played with infectious enthusiasm by guitarist Marco Salcito and the Orchestra Sinfonica Abruzzese conducted by Marcello Bufalini.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95491BR

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Hindemith: Complete Chamber Music for Clarinet

Hindemith: Complete Chamber Music for Clarinet


includes

Hindemith:

Quartet for Clarinet, Violin, Violoncello and Piano

Matteo Fossi (piano), Duccio Ceccanti (violin), Vittorio Ceccanti (cello)

Sonata for Clarinet & Piano in B flat major

Matteo Fossi (piano)

Clarinet Quintet, Op. 30

1955 version

Quartetto Savinio

Musikalisches Blumengärtlein und Leÿptziger Allerleÿ

Marc-Antoine Bonanomi (double bass)

Abendkonzert from 'Plöner Musiktag D Nr.2'

Alexander Grytsayenko (violin)

Quartetto Savinio

Ludus minor, 5 pieces for clarinet & cello

Joel Marosi (cello)


Davide Bandieri (clarinet)

For this release, clarinettist Davide Bandieri is joined by a superlative group of musicians, all determined to shine a light on some of Hindemith’s most sensitively scored chamber music. As a keen amateur clarinettist himself, Hindemith composed for the instrument throughout his life. This repertoire therefore takes us on a journey right from his early works in the 1920s – when the composer was influenced by the ailing conservative composer Arnold Mendelssohn – to the mid 1950s, when his music had been strongly shaped by Schoenberg’s ideas about tonality. Characteristically for Hindemith, much of his clarinet repertoire is Hausmusik – written for a domestic setting rather than public performance. A sense of intimacy can therefore be heard alongside the composer’s typical wit. The Musikalisches Blumengärtlein is one of Hindemith’s many parody pieces, with tongue-in-cheek comic effects in its unusual instrumentation and original movement names like the punning ‘Canon (for shooting)’.

Throughout his life, Hindemith was determined not to let his music become part of the ‘routine’ of professional musicians. He was careful to keep his compositions light, and to compose for all sorts of instruments and genres, leaving us with a fascinating legacy. The musicians on this album are all experienced interpreters of chamber music; several, including Davide Bandieri, have long played with the prestigious Lausanne Chamber Orchestra. The Quartetto Savinio, who join Bandieri for the Quintet Op.30, have been described as the ‘one worthy heir to the Quartetto Italiano’ (L’Unità).

The pieces on this double-CD are evidence of Paul Hindemith’s love for the clarinet, an instrument of which he was a keen amateur player and for which he wrote a considerable amount of music.

The Clarinet Sonata, Quartet and Quintet were intended for the concert hall, while the other pieces were written for amateurs to be played in more private settings, Hindemith’s mission being to create approachable music for as many people as possible.

In all these works Hindemith’s particular style shines through: from the strict neo-classicism, the “Neue Sachlichkeit” to vigorous expressionism, all sharing his joy of invention and creation.

Played by Italian master clarinettist Davide Bandieri, who played solo clarinet in the Lucerne Festival Orchestra and Mahler Chamber Orchestra conducted by Claudio Abbado. For this recording he secured the collaboration of such eminent instrumentalists as pianist Matteo Fossi, violinist Duccio Ceccanti and cellist Vittorio Ceccanti.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95295BR

(CD - 2 discs)

$9.75

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Gliere: Piano Music

Gliere: Piano Music


Glière:

Preludes (25), Op. 30

Romance, Op. 16, No. 2

12 Children's Pieces, Op. 31 4. Träumereien

12 Children's Pieces, Op. 31 6. Valzer

12 Children's Pieces, Op. 31 10. Lied aus dem Osten

12 Children's Pieces, Op. 31 11. Albumblatt

Two Piano Pieces, Op. 99: I. Impromptu for the Left Hand in E Major

Two Piano Pieces, Op. 99: II. Melodie B-Flat Major


Gianluca Imperato (piano)

Working in all the standard genres from string quartet to symphony, sonata to concerto, ballet to opera, Reinhold Glière never attained the fame of his contemporary Rachmaninov, but his music is no less recognisably Russian, no less filled with long and aching cantabile melodies; the significant point of contrast is that Glière, who never left Russia, was not afflicted with the pervasive melancholy that so memorably colours Rachmaninov’s music.

The difference is quickly apparent in the 30 Preludes which are Glière’s major contribution to piano literature. The C minor Second may very obviously be written in the shadow of Chopin, but most of the major-key examples enjoy the carefree mood of a relaxed, Russian Brahms. Nearly all of them invite words to be sung with them, such as the spring-like No.7 or the Romance of No.15. For pianists and lovers of Romantic piano music alike, the Preludes of Glière should be a joyful discovery.

On his debut recording for Brilliant Classics, Gianluca Imperato complements the Preludes with selections from other, slighter keyboard collections: the Kinderstücke Op.31, 12 Sketches Op.47 and then the Two Piano Pieces Op.99 dating from 1955: an impromptu for left-hand alone which is not to be confused with his Op.35 No.9 (a favourite miniature for violin and cello recitals); indeed neither it nor the companion Melodie have been recorded before. They show that at the age of 80, Glière could still pen music that was remarkably refined, calm and melancholy; suspended in time, or beyond the reach of events.

Reinhold Glière (1875-1956) was a Russian composer and violinist. His works draw inspiration from his great example Chopin, as well as from various other Russian composers and contemporaries: Rachmaninoff, Scriabin for his harmonic and pianistic style, and Khachaturian and Kabalevsky for the folklore elements and Soviet realism.

This new recording contains his 25 Preludes Op. 30, following the same tonal sequence as Chopin’s 24 Preludes but adding a 25th prelude in C major. Furthermore we hear several character pieces, of great charm, atmosphere and melodic invention.

Italian pianist Gianluca Imperato won many prizes at international piano competitions, as well as the prestigious Solti Foundation grant.

“Sensitive and mature pianist, a true revelation” wrote the Italian newspaper La Repubblica.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Brilliant Classics - 95296BR

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$8.00

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