BR Klassik – up to 25% off

New releases

Prices shown exclude VAT. (UK tax is not payable for deliveries to United States.)
See Terms & Conditions for p&p rates.

Duruflé: Requiem & Respighi: Concerto Gregoriano

Duruflé: Requiem & Respighi: Concerto Gregoriano


Duruflé:

Requiem, Op. 9

Okka von der Damerau (mezzo), Ljubomir Puškari (baritone), Max Hanf (cello)

Respighi:

Concerto gregoriano


Henry Raudale (organ)

Munchner Rundfunkorchester, Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Ivan Repušić

Ivan Repušić, the new chief conductor of the Munich Rundfunkorchester, devotes his first CD on BR-KLASSIK to works by the composers Maurice Duruflé and Ottorino Respighi, both of whom took a major interest in the melodies and harmonies of Gregorian chant. The French composer Duruflé’s “Requiem" is based on the Gregorian "Missa pro defunctis", the Latin Mass for the Dead, and the Italian Respighi, in his "Concerto Gregoriano", used Gregorian chant as a source of inspiration for the harmonious sound of the concerto and for the song-like treatment he gives to the solo violin. Maurice Duruflé's “Requiem” became especially well-known. Its first performance in 1947 was one of the high points of his career; the work not only helped to establish Duruflé as a successful composer but also brought him fame far beyond the borders of France. This self-contained, homogeneous and contemplative composition is based on themes from the Gregorian Mass for the Dead. In his work, Duruflé succeeded in fusing Gregorian chant, Baroque polyphony and colourful orchestration into a unified whole, and the spiritual, inward-looking character of the chants harmonises most effectively with the composer’s personal style. The impact of Gregorian chant on the composer Ottorino Respighi was “like an addiction”, and it had a vast influence on his work. Elements of it can be heard in almost all the works he composed after 1920. One reason why these puristic melodies, in conjunction with the harmony of the ecclesiastical modes, fascinated him so much was that they represented the greatest possible contrast to the overheated, chromatically refined harmonies of the Verists and the post-Wagnerians. Becoming increasingly atonal was never an option for Respighi; it was in the archaic and austere character of Gregorian chant, and in ancient melodies, that he recognised the greatest innovative potential.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900320

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mahler: Symphony No. 5

Mahler: Symphony No. 5


All Mahler scholars have agreed from the very start that Gustav Mahler embarked on an entirely new path with his Fifth Symphony. Even for his immediate contemporaries, such as the conductor Bruno Walter or the music critic Paul Bekker, the Fifth marked the beginning of a new creative phase, and Mahler himself was also keenly aware of this – which is why he was all the more upset by the fact that his work was not understood at its premiere in Cologne in October 1904 and, even later, met with a largely negative reception. In 1905, following an unsuccessful performance in Hamburg, the composer complained: "The Fifth is an accursed work. No-one understands it.” It was only after Mahler’s death in May 1911 that people slowly began to appreciate the piece. The Fifth ranks today as one of Mahler's most popular symphonies. This is due in part to Luchino Visconti's 1971 film adaptation of Thomas Mann's novella ‘Death in Venice’, which used the symphony’s world-famous Adagietto to great effect: the movement enjoyed unanimous approval from the very start, and has now advanced to become Mahler's ‘greatest hit’ and the most famous work in his entire oeuvre. In its structure, the symphony does not follow the classic four-movement form, but presents us with five movements in three sections. Conceptually, Mahler relies on methods he had already tried and tested in the work’s great predecessors, the Second and Third Symphonies. The centerpiece of the work is a lengthy scherzo full of grotesque humour, inspired by Jean Paul, while its resting-point is the Adagietto, which certainly bears many of the hallmarks of Mahler's slow movements. The harsher sound of this symphony ushered in a new creative phase for Mahler – one that he developed further in the Sixth. The maximum use he makes of the tonal means available already clearly anticipates the Ninth, in which he begins to abandon tonality altogether and encompass the transcendental aspect of the music. This Munich concert event of March 2016, now released as a CD by BR KLASSIK, is an outstanding interpretation of one of the most important compositions of the international symphonic repertoire of the early 20th century.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900150

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Handel: The Occasional Oratorio, HWV62

Handel: The Occasional Oratorio, HWV62

World premiere recording of the Oratorio according to the Neue Hallische Handel edition, Herkulessaal , Munich, 11.02.2017


Julia Doyle (soprano), Ben Johnson (tenor) & Peter Harvey (baritone)

Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks & Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin, Howard Arman

For his Occasional Oratorio, composed in 1746 in an age of personal and political upheaval, Handel made generous use of much of his own earlier material, and this resulted in something quite close to an anthology: a choice collection of his most beautiful and most famous pieces – a 'Best Of', as it were. The Messiah librettist Charles Jennens complained loudly that the oratorio was "a triumph for a victory not yet gain'd", and that its libretto, by a certain Newburgh Hamilton, was an "inconceivable jumble of John Milton and Edmund Spenser". Nevertheless, the Occasional Oratorio offers the modern listener magnificent and largely familiar melodies, highly virtuosic Baroque arias, moving choruses and, above all, a magnificent Late Baroque sound that, in this extremely compact score, is quite unique. Audiences at the time probably considered this to be 'Handel at his best', and today's public doubtlessly shares that opinion. This virtuoso and colourful interpretation, recorded recently on February 11, 2017 in the Herkulessaal of the Munich Residenz, was an exemplary success, delighting the audience and the trade press alike. Howard Arman conducted the Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks, the Akademie für Alte Music Berlin with its historically informed performance practice, and a line-up of highly talented English soloists. This concert recording is also the world's first recording of the Occasional Oratorio according to the historically researched and edited score of the Neue Hallische Handel edition.

“Julia Doyle sings with quicksilver suppleness…Peter Harvey’s diction, vocal suavity and persuasive authority are all spot-on. Ben Johnson’s perfect enunciation, husky timbre and fulsome projection remind me of Robert Tear. The Bavarian Radio Choir always have plenty of discipline and articulacy, with only rare hints of Teutonic vowels. They sing with robust muscle in the bellicose music.” Gramophone Magazine, Awards Issue 2017

“Conductor Howard Arman uses fairly modest forces, with the Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks comprising of 43 singers. Performing with an elevated quality, the choir delivers full-toned singing in a constantly rewarding performance marked by a compelling unity and unaffected expression in the text.” MusicWeb International, September 2017

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900520

(CD - 2 discs)

Normally: $25.75

Special: $19.31

(also available to download from $20.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 'Choral'

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 'Choral'

Live recording, Aula Paolo VI, Vatikan in Rome, 27.10.2007


Hollow pathos is not his thing. From an artist like Mariss Jansons, Friedrich Schiller’s ode An die Freude has a far deeper significance, which also fully encompasses the doubt and profound hope embodied in this text. And thus, in Jansons’s recording of the Ninth Symphony, the choral finale does not degenerate to a merely superficial jubilation, but rather becomes a delicately balanced, wisely developed drama. On October 27 2007, the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks played Beethoven’s Ninth in the presence of the Pope in the Vatican. The recording of this memorable concert is now being released by BR-KLASSIK.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900156

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Gulda Plays Mozart & Gulda

Gulda Plays Mozart & Gulda


Gulda:

Improvisation 1 + 2

Live recording of a concert on June 27, 1982 at the Munich “Klaviersommer” with the jazz pianist Chick Corea

Mozart:

Piano Sonata No. 12 in F major, K332

Live recording of a concert on June 27, 1982 at the Munich “Klaviersommer” with the jazz pianist Chick Corea

Rondo for Piano & Orchestra in A major, K386

Live recording, Munich, Herkulessaal, 04.10.1969

Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Leopold Hager

Rondo for Piano & Orchestra in D major, K382

Live recording, Munich, Herkulessaal, 04.10.1969

Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Leopold Hager


Mozart was certainly among the "domestic deities" of Viennese pianist Friedrich Gulda. He repeatedly played Mozart's piano music in his concerts and had it recorded. In so doing, this classically-trained musician, who had already played successfully in jazz bands at a young age, ignored the strict limits imposed by genres: he wanted to show audiences that there are no distinctions between musical styles whenever good music is played honestly and conscientiously. On June 27, 1982, Gulda again appeared at Munich's "Klaviersommer" festival. His partner was the jazz pianist Chick Corea, and the collaboration of both musicians is documented on the CD (and DVD) "The Meeting" - a standard in recording history. Until now, only the famous second half of this concert has been available and not the first, which Gulda performed on his own and was devoted primarily to Mozart. Gulda thus used Mozart's piano music as a kind of introduction to the world of jazz improvisation. The first part of this legendary concert, performed at the Deutsches Museum in the summer of 1982, took the soloist Gulda over 40 minutes to perform, even though he "only" played Mozart's Piano Sonata in C Major K 330. But he began and ended it with his own improvisations, which sound less than Mozartian, even though they do contain a broad and subtle range of different styles and effects, catchy melodies, and violent cascades of sound. Gulda proves to be a highly gifted interpreter of Mozart as well as a mischievous improviser on the piano – who also wants to entertain and can do so on a high level. - As a transition to the second part of the concert, he performs two of his own compositions, which can also be heard on this CD from BR-KLASSIK. It is a piece of good fortune that the Bayerischer Rundfunk has now made the first half of this concert event accessible to a wide audience too.The recording begins and ends with Mozart's rarely-heard Rondos for Piano and Orchestra in A Major KV 386 and D Major KV 382. Gulda played them on October 4, 1969 in the Herkulessaal of the Munich Residenz, accompanied by the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks under Leopold Hager. Gulda plays cheerfully without the slightest audible effort, combining Mozart with the finesse of a grandiose performer who is in fact laughing up his sleeve.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900713

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Pärt: Live

Pärt: Live


Pärt:

Collage on B-A-C-H

Robert King

Seven Magnificat Antiphons

Peter Dijkstra

Cecilia, vergine romana for mixed choir and orchestra

Ulf Schirmer

Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten

Ulf Schirmer

Litany

Marcello Viotti


Arvo Pärt, who was born in Estonia in 1935, has succeeded in bringing sacred music back to a broader audience, and away from the confines of the church service, more than almost any other contemporary composer. The meditative character of his works, and his return to the simplest and most basic musical forms, convey moments of intense spirituality. Even before his emigration from the Soviet Union to Austria and then to Germany, Pärt had already invented what he termed the tintinnabuli style of composition (from the Latin word for a bell). He produced an early and important example of this style in 1977 with the "Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten", scored for string orchestra and bell, and it is also a key feature of the three great choral works that form the greater part of this new BR-KLASSIK CD "Arvo Pärt: Live", namely the "Seven Magnificat Antiphons" for mixed choir a capella, the large-scale oratorio "Cecilia, vergine romana" for mixed choir and orchestra, and the vocal work „Litany – Prayers of St John Chrysostom for Each Hour of the Day and Night” for soloists, mixed choir and orchestra. Also included on this CD is the "Collage on B-A-C-H" for strings, oboe, harpsichord and piano. Composed in 1964, before Pärt's aesthetic reorientation, it is one of his most famous works. Despite its radical reduction of means of expression, Pärt's music demands the greatest care in execution from those performing it – and this has been masterfully realized in the present recording by the Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks and the Münchner Rundfunkorchester, whose combined and homogenous sound is a direct result of their regular cooperation. Ulf Schirmer, Marcello Viotti und the choir's current artistic director Peter Dijkstra here demonstrate their deep familiarity with the subtle sound-world of Arvo Pärt.These live recordings were made at Munich concerts in July 2000, February and December 2005, and January and October 2011, all of which received public and critical acclaim.

“A highly desirable collection.” MusicWeb International, June 2017

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900319

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Fritz Wunderlich - Vinyl Edition

Fritz Wunderlich - Vinyl Edition

Early, as yet unreleased radio recordings made between 1959 and 1965.


Fall, L:

O Rose von Stambul (from Die Rose von Stambul)

Künneke, Eduard:

Ich träume mit offenen Augen (from Die lockende Flamme)

Das Lied vom Leben des Schrenk (from Die Grosse Sünderin)

Lehár:

Schön ist die Welt (from Schön ist die Welt)

Lortzing:

Lebe wohl, mein flandrisch Mädchen (from Zar und Zimmermann)

Lied: Vater, Mutter, Schestern, Bruder (from Undine)

Man wird ja einmal nur geboren (from Der Waffenschmied)

Mattes:

Melodia con passione

Millöcker:

Wie schon ist alles (from Die Dubarry)

Mein Weg führt immer mich zu Dir zurück (from Die Dubarry)

Spoliansky:

Heute Nacht oder nie (from Das Lied einer Nacht)

Stolz, R:

Ob blond, ob braun, Ich liebe die Frau'n

Strauss, J, II:

Treu sein, das liegt mir nicht (from Eine Nacht in Venedig)


Although fifty years have now passed since Fritz Wunderlich’s tragic death on September 17, 1966, the singer and his incomparable tenor voice have remained unforgotten. One reason for this was the meteoric success of his artistic career. Following his performance in a student production of Mozart's Magic Flute in Freiburg, the young singer was instantly engaged by the Stuttgart State Opera, then went on to Frankfurt and Munich, performed at the Vienna State Opera and the Salzburg Festival, and had already received an offer from the New York Metropolitan Opera. What people remember most about him was his vital, lively personality, his almost limitless ability to cope under pressure, and of course his mellifluous voice, with its great depth, radiance, and delightful timbre. His accurate and always intelligible pronunciation of the words he sang has remained quite unparalleled. He performed operetta scenes with ease and charming levity; he bestowed the grace of genuine feeling onto lieder that had fallen into sentimental discredit; and he belted out party pieces with all the effortless verve of an Italian….

This new CD from BR-KLASSIK to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the singer’s death presents early, as yet unreleased radio recordings made between 1959 and 1965. The recordings of some Munich Sunday concerts and studio recordings by the Bayerischer Rundfunk show him and his tenor voice at the height of their success. Together with the Munich Radio Orchestra and the Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks, he can be experienced singing with such renowned conductors as Kurt Eichhorn, Siegfried Köhler, Willy Mattes, Hans Moltkau and Meinhard von Zallinger.

Here he focused primarily on the German repertoire, from comic opera to operetta all the way to popular hits which, to this day, more or less owe their very survival to his interpretations of them in concerts and recordings.

Fritz Wunderlich - the tenor voice of the 20th century par excellence – can be relived here in these unreleased recordings from BR-KLASSIK.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900315

(Vinyl)

Normally: $35.25

Special: $28.20

(also available to download from $20.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Ravel: L’heure espagnole

Ravel: L’heure espagnole

Live recording from a recent Munich "Sonntagskonzert" on April 24, 2016, Prinzregententheater, Munich


Chabrier:

España

Ravel:

L'heure Espagnole

Gaëlle Arquez (Concepcion), Julien Behr (Gonzalve), Mathias Vidal (Torquemada), Alexandre Duhamel (Ramiro) & Lionel Lhote (Don Inigo Gomez)


The thought of Spain filled many French composers of the 19th and early 20th century with musical yearning – one has only to think of Georges Bizet's opera "Carmen", Maurice Ravel's "Rhapsodie espagnole" (1907), or his famous "Boléro" (1928). Ravel was already inspired by things Iberian in his first work for the stage: "L’heure espagnole" ("The Spanish Hour"), a one-act musical comedy set in Toledo, which premiered in Paris on May 19, 1911. Here he combined fantasy and comedy in the action with “spoken music” full of local Spanish colour. The short opera ends, for instance, with a fiery habanera. Ravel masterfully and wittily integrates the clocks chiming in the workshop of clockmaker Torquemada into the score, together with the sound of their ticking, and of all kinds of chimes or mechanical music machines producing cuckoo calls when striking the hour. Emmanuel Chabrier's rhapsody for orchestra with the promising title of "España" was composed in 1883 and premiered in Paris. The music was inspired by a Spanish journey that Chabrier had undertaken the year before, during which he had noted down many original motifs and rhythms. Spanish folklore is ever-present; in addition to the melodies, it is above all the rhythmic motifs and movement patterns that, when combined, achieve a complexity that was still unknown in art music at that time. A magnificently rousing dance piece in rapid triple time.

A concert performance of the two works took place on April 24, 2016 as part of the "Sonntagskonzerte" (Sunday Concerts) series in Munich’s Prinzregententheater, and can now be experienced on CD. Ravel's opera (in its original French-language version) is interpreted by young soloists, all of them entirely at home in the Franco-Spanish oeuvre; they are accompanied by the Munich Rundfunkorchester under the direction of Asher Fisch.

“Fisch aims for headiness but avoids blatancy. Rhythms pulse and throb, and the Hispanic turns of melody often have a pointed suavity that hints at innuendo...The singers play it straight without resorting to caricature. The results are often nicely ambivalent...Arquez's glamorous Concepción has a wonderful line in understated obscenity...It's a fine achievement.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2017

“No reason to hesitate with this impressive live recording.” MusicWeb International, June 2017

“Asher Fisch conducts the Munich Radio Orchestra with excellent control and sensitivity; the cast of five singers is well suited to the task. A glittering concert performance of Chabrier’s España, added as an extra offering on the disc, reminds us of the composer who was one of Ravel’s major influences.” classicalsource.com, September 2017 ****

Released or re-released in last 6 months

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900317

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Mahler: Symphony No. 9

Mahler: Symphony No. 9

Live-Recording: Munich, Philharmonie im Gasteig, 20./21.10.2016


Gustav Mahler's Ninth Symphony is primarily regarded as the composer’s reaction in the summer of 1908 to the diagnosis of a heart ailment, which he received just before writing the first sketches for the work. Mahler was deeply distraught and cannot have known how few years he still had left to live. His processing and exploration of his life experiences, and of valedictions, the meaning of life, death, salvation, life after death and love, always took place in and through his music. The Ninth Symphony was composed between 1909 and 1910 in Toblach, in a kind of creative frenzy, and was first performed in Vienna on June 26, 1912 by the Vienna Philharmonic, under the baton of Bruno Walter. Mahler had already died on May 18, 1911, and was no longer able to experience the premiere of his last completed work. Willem Mengelberg, the first ardent conductor of the composer’s works, wrote in his score: "Mahler's soul sings its farewell!" Mahler's Ninth Symphony represents the culmination of a development process. The progressive chromaticism and maximum utilization of the tonal are here taken to their limits - and, for the first time, beyond them. Indeed, the two movements that frame the work, in particular, depart from the tonal entirely, pointing clearly to the dawn of a new musical epoch. Alban Berg even called this symphony "the first work of New Music". The Munich concert event of October 2016 is now being released on CD by BR-KLASSIK – it is an outstanding interpretation of one of the most important compositions of the international symphonic repertoire of the early 20th century.

“Mariss Jansons here directs a memorable live account of Mahler 9, drawing stunning playing of considerable intensity from his Bavarian orchestra. Immaculately prepared, as usual, I admire Jansons’ masterly control of tempo, dynamic and scale. Beautifully recorded too at the Philharmonie, Munich” MusicWeb International, March 2017

“Mahler’s Ninth is wonderfully rich in nuance in this recording. The playing of the BR-Orchester under Mariss Jansons is filled with emotion, and yet never threatens to let sentimentality gain the upper hand. This has a great deal to do with the thoroughly musical care taken by Jansons, who is never swept away by the symphony’s programme.” FonoForum, April 2017 *****

“As ever, Mariss Jansons produces an exquisitely moulded performance, with every transition beautifully managed, and every dynamic scrupulously observed. The orchestra plays with refinement.” Daily Telegraph, 25th March 2017 ***

“Mariss Jansons’s Munich Mahler scores highest for warmth, intelligence and emotional centredness.” Classical Ear, 23rd March 2017 ***

“I can’t think of a Ninth with less neurasthenic edge and a more inviting legato character. The playing [is] of predictable finesse…its restrained expressivity and cultured sound provide easeful balm for difficult times” Gramophone Magazine, May 2017

“What is special is the care [Jansons] the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and the engineers have taken with the quieter music: those haunting, shadowy transitions in the Andante; those remote, blanched contrapuntal episodes in the finale. And the final fade-out must surely be among the most fine-spun on record” BBC Music Magazine, June 2017 ****

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900151

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Bach, J S: St John Passion, BWV245

Bach, J S: St John Passion, BWV245

Live recording, Nuremberg, St. Lorenz Church, “ION – Nuremberg International Organ Week” in March 2015


Maximilian Schmitt (Evangelist), Tareq Nazmi (Christ), Christina Landshamer (soprano), Anke Vondung (mezzo-soprano), Tilman Lichdi (tenor), Krešimir Stražanac (bass-baritone / Pilate), Simona Brüninghaus (Maid), Andreas Burkhart (Petrus) & Moon Yung Oh / Andreas Hirtreiter (Servant)

Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks & Concerto Köln, Peter Dijkstra

The music of Bach's 'St. John Passion', which the composer wrote for Holy Week in 1724 immediately after his appointment as cantor of St Thomas's Church in Leipzig, still retains all its freshness and vitality nearly 300 years later, and is a true Baroque delight. The two main choruses Herr, unser Herrscher and Ruht wohl, ihr heiligen Gebeine form the beginning and culmination of a large-scale orchestral and vocal structure in which Bach reveals his absolute mastery of polyphony. Inwardly reflective chorales are as much interwoven into the events of the Passion as the haunting arias which comment on the biblical texts of the Gospel of St John. Throughout this solemn Passion oratorio, there is a constant emphasis on Baroque musical magnificence.

What makes this live recording of the concert version of March 2015 so special? The fresh voices of the young and excellent vocal soloists, the regularly praised "astonishing three-dimensionality" and "crystalline clarity" of the Chor des Bayerischen Rundfunks under the direction of Peter Dijkstra and, of course, the renowned period instrument ensemble Concerto Köln.

This recording of Bach's 'St John Passion' has now been released on DVD, at a concert during the “ION – Nuremberg International Organ Week” in Nuremberg’s St. Lorenz Church, and enhanced by the film “Stories of Hope – Music that Touches the Soul” by Melitta Müller-Hansen.

Booklet: in German / in English

Libretto: in German

Total time: 144 min

“Schmitt’s Evangelist is a knowing, centred and sage creation, sung with a conviction underlined by emotional subtlety and ringing clarity of diction. A touch understated for some, perhaps, Tareq Nazmi’s Jesus is nonetheless a persuasive amalgam of nobility and humility. Supporting voices provide strength in depth with the Bavarian Radio Chorus, clearly on top form at the moment, providing a richly rewarding and often sublime accompaniment.” Choir & Organ, June 2017 ****

DVD Video

Region: 0

Format: NTSC

BR Klassik - up to 25% off

BR Klassik - 900515

(DVD Video)

Normally: $23.50

Special: $18.80

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Page: 

1 2

 Next >>

Copyright © 2002-17 Presto Classical Limited, all rights reserved.