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Michelangelo in Song

Michelangelo in Song


Britten:

Seven Sonnets of Michelangelo, Op. 22

transposed for bass voice by David Owen Norris

Shostakovich:

Suite on verses by Michelangelo Buonarroti, for bass & piano, Op. 145

Wolf, H:

Songs (3) on poems by Michelangelo Buonarroti


When the name of Michelangelo comes up in conversation it is usually in connection with such undisputed masterpieces as the statue of David in front of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence (the original now in the Accademia gallery), or the legendary ceiling dome of the Sistine Chapel at the St Peter’s Basilica in Rome. What fewer people might know is that Michelangelo also wrote a great number of poems, including madrigals and sonnets, some of which were set to music by such illustrious composers as Benjamin Britten, Hugo Wolf, and Dmitri Shostakovich.

The internationally acclaimed bass Sir John Tomlinson and pianist David Owen Norris have performed these songs at their Michelangelo evenings on many occasions. At these events the sixteenth-century Michelangelo is portrayed by Tomlinson in updated form, as a nineteenth-century painter in his workshop, looking over his old papers and poems, and reliving each one in turn. The singer explains that the idea was inspired in part by his many years of playing historical characters on the opera stage, and partly by his seeing, at a London exhibition in 2010, the actual pieces of paper upon which the sculptor himself had written out some of his poems – an encounter he describes as ‘Extraordinary!’

Shostakovich felt strongly that Michelangelo’s poetry transcended its Italian roots to have a universal appeal, and that it embraced ‘profound philosophical ideas, humanism, and penetrating reflections of love and art’. For the Suite on Verses of Michelangelo Buonarroti, the composer selected eight of Michelangelo’s sonnets and three other poems, all in Russian translations, covering the principal subject areas of wisdom, love, creativity, death, and immortality.

The Seven Sonnets of Michelangelo was the first song-cycle that Britten composed specifically with the voice of his partner, Peter Pears, in mind. At the time, Britten was consciously broadening his musical horizons in an attempt to free himself from his English roots. He did this in part by setting foreign-language text to music. The resulting love songs recorded here are passionate, ecstatic, almost evangelical in tone.

Drei Gedichte von Michelangelo, based on poems about the joy and pain of love and youth, and the brevity of life, were among the last compositions written by Hugo Wolf, before his descent into mental illness. He had originally envisioned that these settings would become the beginning of a large-scale portrait of the poet, but sadly this project never materialised.

“With the experience of a long operatic career, and a voice still richly intact if understandably at times a little weathered, Tomlinson brings drama and wisdom to the feelings expressed here.” The Observer, 8th September 2013

“a sort of King Lear-style meeting of voice and repertoire, especially in the Wolf and Shostakovich cycles...Rhetorical moments go fairly well, the Wolf songs having particular authority.” Gramophone Magazine, October 2013

“Few basses have the right inky-black colour [Shostakovich] imagined...Tomlinson does, and he chills the soul...Owen Norris, sometimes overpedalling in the earlier songs, brings a special focus to extraordinary accompniments...The sound captures the velvet that still sometimes envelops the wear and tear of his voice.” BBC Music Magazine, December 2013 ****

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Mozart: The Magic Flute

Mozart: The Magic Flute


Mozart:

Die Zauberflöte, K620

Sung in English (translation by Jeremy Sams)


Barry Banks (Tamino), Rebecca Evans (Pamina), Elizabeth Vidal (Queen of the Night), Simon Keenlyside (Papageno), John Tomlinson (Sarastro), Majella Cullagh (First Lady), Sarah Fox (Second Lady), Diana Montague (Third Lady), Lesley Garrett (Papagena), John Graham-Hall (Monostatos)

Geoffrey Mitchell Choir, New London Children’s Choir, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras

“No work makes better sense in the vernacular than Mozart's concluding masterpiece. The composer and, assuredly, Schikaneder would have approved of giving the work in the language of the listeners, and when you have to hand such a witty, well-worded translation as that of Jeremy Sams, it makes even better sense. Sir Charles Mackerras has always been an advocate of opera in English when the circumstances are right.
As ever, he proves himself a loving and perceptive Mozartian. Throughout he wonderfully contrasts the warmth and sensuousness of the music for the good characters with the fire and fury of the baddies, and he persuades the LPO to play with a lightness and promptness that's wholly enchanting, quite the equal of most bands on the other available versions.
In no way is his interpretation here inferior to his German one on Telarc; indeed, in the central roles of Tamino and Pamina the casting for Chandos is an improvement, and Keenlyside is fully the equal of Thomas Allen on the Telarc set. Keenlyside's loveable, slightly sad, very human and perfectly sung Papageno is at the centre of things. Rebecca Evans's voice has taken on a new richness without losing any of its focus or delicacy of utterance. Everything she does has sincerity and poise, although her diction might, with advantage, be clearer.
The recording is fine apart from an over-use of thunder and lightning as sound effects. Anyone wanting the work in English needn't hesitate to acquire this set, the first-ever on CD.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“Of all repertoire operas, none gains more than The Magic Flute from performance in the language of the audience. Musically, the performance is hard to fault. Articulation is light and buoyant, tempos mobile yet never driven or inflexible, textures sharp and transparent. Rebecca Evans, a richer-toned Pamina than usual, movingly portrays her development from ingénue to woman 'worthy to attain the light'. ...Simon Keenlyside is a marvellous Papageno, innocent, vulnerable and funny without clownishness. Barry Banks... sings a positive, un-wimpish Tamino. With his rugged, rolling bass John Tomlinson creates a formidably imposing yet humane Sarastro, while Elizabeth Vidal atones for some cloudy diction with fiery, bang in-tune performances of the Queen of the Night's arias. ...this new performance, beautifully recorded, with a modicum of well-judged sound effects, catches the work's fairytale wonder, solemnity and fun as fully and delightfully as any, irrespective of language.” BBC Music Magazine, June 2005 *****

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - June 2005

BBC Music Magazine

Disc of the month - June 2005

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3121

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Handel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto

Handel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto

Libretto by Nicola Haym. English translation by Brian Trowell. Edition prepared by Noel Davies and Sir Charles Mackerras


Dame Janet Baker (Julius Caesar), Valerie Masterson (Cleopatra), Della Jones (Sextus), Sarah Walker (Cornelia), James Bowman (Ptolemy), John Tomlinson (Achillas), Christopher Booth-Jones (Curio), David James (Nirenus)

English National Opera Orchestra, English National Opera Chorus, Sir Charles Mackerras

“This opera was a personal triumph for Dame Janet. As Caesar, she arms the voice with an impregnable firmness, outgoing and adventurous.
Valerie Masterson shares the honours with Dame Janet, a Cleopatra whose bright voice gains humanity through ordeal. The tinkle of surface- wear clears delightfully in her later arias, sung with a pure tone and high accomplishment.
As a total production, Julius Caesar was an outstanding achievement in ENO's history.
Strongly cast, it had a noble Cornelia in Sarah Walker, a high-spirited Sesto in Della Jones, and in James Bowman a Ptolemy whose only fault was that his voice lacked meanness of timbre appropriate to the odious character. John Tomlinson's massive bass also commands attention.
Mackerras's conducting is impeccable and the opera is given in clear, creditable English.
(See next review for the video equivalent.)”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“the ravishing accompaniments to the two big Cleopatra arias amply justify the use by the excellent ENO orchestra of modern rather than period instruments...The full, vivid studio sound makes this one of the very finest of the invaluable series of ENO opera recordings in English.” Penguin Guide, 2010

“Even if opera in English translation (or baroque opera on modern instruments) doesn't usually grab you, Charles Mackerras's legendary 1979 remains unmissable, not least for Dame Janet Baker's supremely authoritative Caesar, Sarah Walker's stately Cornelia and John Tomlinson's blustery Achilla.” Katherine Cooper, Presto Classical, August 2014

Building a Library

First Choice (CD) - December 2011

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3019

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Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande

Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande

Sung in English


Neil Howlett (Golaud), Eilene Hannon (Mélisande), Robert Dean (Pelleas), Sarah Walker (Genevieve), John Tomlinson (Arkel), Rosanne Brackenridge (Yniold) & Sean Rea (Doctor)

English National Opera Orchestra and Chorus, Mark Elder

This live BBC broadcast of Claude Debussy’s ground-breaking opera Pelléas and Mélisande was recorded at the Coliseum in 1981. The unique performance is now available on CD for the first time, as part of Chandos’ Opera in English historical series, performed by the English National Opera Orchestra and Chorus under Sir Mark Elder, with the soloists Neil Howlett, Eilene Hannon, and Robert Dean playing out the tragic love triangle.

It is not so much the extremity of emotions in opera that moves us, but their intensity. And intense emotion does not need to be loud, or dramatic. It can be quiet, deep, and profound, as in this operatic masterpiece, based on Maeterlinck’s symbolist drama. With its simple setting of every day words, and slow-burning passion, the opera emerged in the early twentieth century as the very antithesis to the Wagnerian style. In the words of Debussy himself: ‘I imagine a kind of drama quite different from Wagner’s in which music would begin where the words are powerless as an expressive force. Music is made for the inexpressible.’

Debussy purposely avoided elaborate and lyrical language, and wrote in the simplest prose. In fact, most of the characters speak to one another in plain speech, and everything they say is, on the surface, completely transparent. But the waters run deep, and as questions bring about either the wrong reply or no reply at all, the simple language only deepens the obscurity of what is actually being said.

The plot is based on a tragic love triangle. Prince Golaud finds a mysterious young woman, Mélisande, lost in a forest. He marries her and brings her back to the castle of his grandfather, King Arkel of Allemonde. Here Mélisande becomes increasingly attached to Golaud’s half-brother, Pelléas, arousing Golaud’s jealousy. Golaud goes to excessive lengths to find out the truth about the relationship and Pelléas eventually decides to leave the castle, but he arranges to meet Mélisande one last time and the two finally confess their love for each other. Golaud, who has been eavesdropping, rushes out and kills Pelléas. Not long after, having given birth to a daughter, and with Golaud still begging her to tell him ‘the truth’, Mélisande dies.

“an unfussy, lucid rendering of an opera whose vocal lines, so closely wedded to French prosody, present perhaps more of a challenge to translators than any other in the repertoire. The casting shows the depth of ENO 30 years ago, with Eilene Hannan as Mélisande, more knowing, less naive than some portrayals, the baritone Robert Dean a Pelléas with just the right mix of muscularity and lyric grace” The Guardian, 12th January 2012 ***

“Tomlinson giv[es] Arkel the goodness and dignity Debussy asked for...If Pelleas in English appeals, this recording fits the bill, despite the inevitable noises and variable audibility attendant on stage performance.” BBC Music Magazine, March 2012 ***

“John Tomlinson is a sad, wise Arkel...Neil Howlett is good at the tricky ambivalence that dogs Goldau's every step...[Hannan] modifies her natural ardour into a suitably passionate neutrality...[Dean] traces Pelleas's emotional growth well...Definitely recommended for Anglophone listeners because it's good, for once, to be able to absorb every word” Gramophone Magazine, March 2012

“Elder takes a robust, Wagnerian view of the score...[Hannan] is always characterful, teasing and provocative...[Dean is] good with the words and sounds contrastingly youthful beside Howlett's more mature Golaud...By far the most impressive voices are those of the two basses...Worth encountering primarily for Elder's, and his orchestra's, gripping account of the score.” International Record Review, February 2012

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3177(3)

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Verdi: Don Carlos

Verdi: Don Carlos


Verdi:

Don Carlo

Sung in English (translation by Andrew Porter). Four-act version.


Julian Gavin (Don Carlos), Janice Watson (Elisabeth), Alastair Miles (Philip II), William Dazeley (Rodrigo, Marquis of Posa), Jane Dutton (Eboli), Sir John Tomlinson (Grand Inquisitor), Julia Sporsén (Thibault), Clive Bayley (Old Monk)

Orchestra and Chorus of Opera North, Richard Farnes

3 CDs for the price of 2

Based on Schiller’s play, Verdi’s magnificent and arguably greatest opera, Don Carlos, has everything – intense personal passion and pain enmeshed in the web of political and religious agendas – utterly relevant to today and superbly expressed in a score of gripping intensity.

This recording was made in Leeds Town Hall between Opera North’s May/June 2009 production and is the first recording of the work in English. Conducted by Richard Farnes, the performances knocked everyone who witnessed them sideways.

The Observer thought ‘The work came alive as never before, its passionate exchanges between king, son, stepmother and loyal friend all the more incandescent, an endorsement for the Peter Moores Foundation “Opera in English” series on Chandos, who record this Don Carlos for future release.’ York Press wrote ‘This is a drama torrid enough to satisfy the senses on many levels,’ whilst The Spectator declared Richard Farnes, ‘the best Verdian of our time.’

Tenor Julian Gavin takes the title role, and is ably assisted by William Dazeley as Rodrigo, Janice Watson as Elizabeth, Alistair Miles as Philip II and Sir John Tomlinson as the Grand Inquisitor.

“Best of the principals are Alastair Miles's distinctive King Philip; John Tomlinson's terrifying Grand Inquisitor and Clive Bayley's Monk. Opera North's choral and orchestral forces are both splendid, and conductor Richard Farnes proves a superb interpreter of the score.” BBC Music Magazine, Christmas 2009 ****

“...a well integrated, cleanly delineated performance...The outstanding element is Richard Farnes's forceful and vivid conducting of a finely responsive orchestra.” The Telegraph, 2nd December 2009 ****

“Richard Farnes's outstanding conducting exudes confidence and regularly catches the ear with its theatrical flair and sense of over-arching power” The Guardian, 15th January 2010 ***

“It’s a pleasure to hear so many of the words, particularly from Julian Gavin’s plangent-toned Infante, William Dazeley’s ardent, lyrical Posa and John Tomlinson’s terrifying, gnarly-voiced Inquisitor... yet the best reason for acquiring the set is Richard Farnes’s superb conducting.” Sunday Times, 17th January 2010 ***

“Under Richard Farnes, the orchestral playing will stand comparison with the acknowledged best...The style also impresses as bearing the imprint of a genuine Verdi conductor, with playing where, at times, one feels as though the instruments are contributing their own apt dialogue to the drama.” Gramophone Magazine, April 2010

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3162(3)

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Bartók: Duke Bluebeard's Castle, Sz. 48, Op. 11

Bartók: Duke Bluebeard's Castle, Sz. 48, Op. 11

Sung in English (translation by Chester Kallman)


Sally Burgess (Judith), Sir John Tomlinson (Duke Bluebeard/Minstrel)

Opera North Orchestra, Richard Farnes

“This new version… is splendidly recorded, and Farnes coaxes some superb playing from the orchestra. Sally Burgess makes a fine Judith, bringing out the firmness of her love for Bluebeard, as well as her vulnerability. …Tomlinson… is as commanding as ever, and to listen to this performance as a whole is to marvel anew at the richness and inventiveness of Bartók's score.” BBC Music Magazine, July 2006 *****

“This recording grew from performances by Opera North but the absence of a visual element hardly matters. Nor in this instance does the language issue either. Bluebeard is perfect food for the mind's theatre, the tale of a man alone (as John Tomlinson reminds us in the cryptic spoken prologue) and while under normal circumstances Hungarian would win over any translation, here vivid vocal acting and clarity of diction more than compensate. And there's Farnes's conducting, which even from as early as the introduction counters the pervading darkness with deftly pointed woodwind phrases and a light, expressive curve to the string lines.
Tomlinson's Bluebeard is godlike, cautioning and doleful, the voice hugely resonant. Sally Burgess sounds old enough to know better than to stray thoughtlessly from her father's home. When Judith first views the castle's interior she sounds suitably tremulous and awestruck, though when she blurts out the words 'tell me why the doors are bolted?' an air of petulance spells trouble: her command to 'open!' cues forceful thwacks on timps and bass drum. And so the drama unfolds, Burgess's Judith, shrewish and fatally curious, Tomlinson's Bluebeard, inwardly tortured but fired by Judith's dark beauty. The instruments of torture, the armaments, mountains of gold, tender flowers and spacious kingdom, all are graphically tone-painted, Farnes delivering with distinction every time – though when Burgess gasps at the kingdom newly revealed she keeps her high C fairly short. Tomlinson's most sensitive moment, as so often with him in this work, comes when he recalls his former wives, and Farnes's comes at the 'lake of tears', the perfect dovetailing of winds and strings, mournful but also extremely beautiful.
The later climactic moments are delivered with enormous power, the sum effect very moving.
For a thoroughly sympathetic, theatrically effective English-language Bluebeard's Castle, this new release is about as good as it's likely to get.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“Burgess manages to make Judith the multi-dimensional character she deserves to be...John Tomlinson's Bluebeard broods magnificently, his voice and personality as overpowering as the atmosphere of his castle...let me introduce the third member of the cast: the Orchestra of Opera North conducted by Richard Farnes, who provide vivid colours and deep shadows” Andrew McGregor, bbc.co.uk, 8th August 2006

“Moving and powerful, this English Bluebeard is as good as it gets. …while under normal circumstances I'd favour Hungarian above any translation, here vivid vocal acting and clarity of diction more than compensate. And there's Farnes's conducting, which even from as early as the introduction counters the pervading darkness with deftly pointed woodwind phrases and a light, expressive curve to the string lines. Tomlinson's Bluebeard is godlike, cautioning and doleful, the voice hugely resonant. Tomlinson's most sensitive moment, as so often with him in this work, comes when he recalls his former wives (track 19), and Farnes's comes at the 'lake of tears', the perfect dovetailing of winds and strings, mournful but also extremely beautiful.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2006

BBC Music Magazine

Opera Choice - July 2006

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3133

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Wagner: The Flying Dutchman

Wagner: The Flying Dutchman


Wagner:

Der fliegende Holländer

Sung in English (translation by Christopher Cowell)


John Tomlinson (The Dutchman), Nina Stemme (Senta), Eric Halfvarson (Daland), Kim Begley (Erik), Patricia Bardon (Mary), Peter Wedd (Steersman)

Philharmonia Orchestra, Geoffrey Mitchell Choir, David Parry

“Tomlinson, a favourite in the title-role at Bayreuth, now a veteran, is masterful as the Dutchman, exploiting his wide tonal and expressive range, with few signs of wear on the voice...[Stemme is] fresh and true, to outshine almost any rival on disc.” Penguin Guide, 2010 ****

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3119

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Britten: Billy Budd

Britten: Billy Budd


Philip Langridge (Vere), Simon Keenlyside (Billy), John Tomlinson (Claggart), Alan Opie (Mr Redburn), Matthew Best (Mr Flint), Alan Ewing (Mr Ratcliffe), Francis Egerton (Red Whiskers), Quentin Hayes (Donald), Clive Bayley (Dansker), Mark Padmore (Novice), Roderick Williams (Novice's Friend/Arthur Jones), Richard Coxon (Squeak), Daniel Norman (Maintop)

London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, Tiffin Boys' Choir, Richard Hickox

“Britten's score is so often praised that we tend to neglect the distinction of Forster and Crozier's libretto, sung in this set with unerring conviction by its three principals. Keenlyside and Langridge deserve special mention for their arresting sensitivity throughout the final scenes, when they make the utterances of Billy and Vere so poetic and moving: refined tone allied to eloquent phrasing – the epitome of English singing at its very best. Keenlyside has a voice of just the right weight and an appreciation of how Billy must be at once sympathetic and manly. From first to last you realise the lad's personal magnetism in vocal terms alone, explaining the crew's admiration for his qualities. Langridge is the complete Vere, suggesting the man's easy command of men, his poetic soul, his agony of mind at the awful decision placed in his hands to sacrifice Billy. At the opposite end of the human spectrum, Claggart's dark, twisted being and his depravity of thought are ideally realised by Tomlinson, give or take one or two moments of unsteadiness when his voice comes under pressure. In supporting roles there's also much to admire. Mark Padmore conveys all the Novice's terror in a very immediate, tortured manner. Clive Bayley's Dansker is full of canny wisdom. Alan Opie is a resolute Mr Redburn.
Matthew Best's is an appropriately powerful Mr Flint, though his large, gritty bass-baritone records uneasily.
Hickox conducts with all his old zest for marshalling large forces, searching out every cranny of the score, and the London Symphony forces respond with real virtuosity. Speeds now and again sound a shade too deliberate, and there's not always quite that sense of an ongoing continuum you feel in both of Britten's readings, which are by and large tauter. But the Chandos, using the revised two-act version, comes into most direct competition with Britten's later Decca set. The latter still sounds well, though inevitably it hasn't the aural range of the Chandos recording. Yet nobody will ever quite catch the creative tension the composer brings to his own work. For all that, the Chandos set benefits from this trio of imaginative singers, and most newcomers will be satisfied with its appreciable achievement.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

“the finest cast of principals yet assembled...In Philip Langridge the role of Vere has found its most thoughtful interpreter yet...Comparably magnetic is John Tomlinson's Claggart, the personification of evil, chillingly malevolent in every inflexion...Keenlyside as Billy gains over all rivals in the fresh, youthful incisiveness of the voice” Penguin Guide, 2010 ***

“an outstanding trio of principals – Philip Langridge's erudite, conflicted Captain Vere, Simon Keenlyside's virile yet innocent-sounding Billy and John Tomlinson's pitch-black Claggart. The smaller roles, too, are beautifully characterised, with cameos from young British singers who would go on to make their mark as front-ranking interpreters of Britten's music.” Maurice Millward, Presto Classical, March 2014

Presto Disc of the Week

1st December 2008

Building a Library

First Choice - January 2013

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Chandos - CHAN9826

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Mussorgsky: Boris Godunov (highlights)

Mussorgsky: Boris Godunov (highlights)

Sung in English (translation by David Lloyd-Jones)


John Tomlinson (Boris), Stuart Kale (Prince Shuisky), Clive Bayley (Varlaam), Joan Rodgers (Xenia), Susan Parry (Feodor), Yvonne Howard (Old Nurse), Matthew Best (Pimen)

Opera North Chorus, English Northern Philharmonia, Paul Daniel

“John Tomlinson has made the part of Boris his own, and this generous, 75-minute selection of excerpts from Boris Godunov is highly recommendable, even when compared with current Russian versions of Mussorgsky's masterpiece.” Penguin Guide, 2011 edition

Penguin Guide

Rosette Winner

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Chandos Opera in English - CHAN3007

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Great Operatic Arias 6 - John Tomlinson Volume 1

Great Operatic Arias 6 - John Tomlinson Volume 1

Sung in English


Borodin:

Ni sna, ni otdikha izmuchennoi dushe (from Prince Igor)

Sung in English as 'No rest, no slumber’

Greshno tait, ya skuki ne lyublyu (from Prince Igor)

Sung in English as 'The Prince has drunk his fill?...The sober life of boredom’

Zdorov-li, Knaz? (from Prince Igor)

Sung in English as 'Igor, listen’

Dargomïzhsky:

Okh, toto vse vi devky molodiye (from Russalka)

Sung in English as 'Like every maiden in the whole of Russia’

Handel:

I rage, I melt, I burn…O ruddier than the cherry (from Acis and Galatea)

Samson: Honour and arms scorn such a foe

Lehmann, L:

Myself when young from In a Persian Garden

Mozart:

Wer ein Liebchen hat gefunden (from Die Entführung aus dem Serail)

Sung in English as 'When a maiden takes your fancy’

Ich gehe, doch rate ich dir (from Die Entführung aus dem Serail)

Sung in English as 'I’m going, but take my advice’

Helen Williams (Blonde)

Vivat Bacchus! Bacchus lebe! (from Die Entführung aus dem Serail)

Sung in English as 'Vivat Bacchus! Long live Bacchus!’

Barry Banks (Pedrillo)

Mussorgsky:

Mephistopheles' Song of the Flea

Sung in English as 'There lived a king of old’

Skorbit dusha! (from Boris Godunov)

Sung in English as 'My soul is sad'

Offenbach:

Couplets des deux hommes d'armes (from Geneviève de Brabant)

Sung in English as ‘We’re public guardians bold yet wary’

Andrew Shore (baritone)

Sullivan, A:

A more humane Mikado never (from The Mikado)

When a felon's not engaged in his employment (from The Pirates of Penzance)

Verdi:

A te l'estremo addio ... Il lacerato spirito (from Simon Boccanegra)

Sung in English as 'A last farewell I bid you...My soul is torn with suffering’

Che mai vegg'io … Infelice! e tu credevi (from Ernani)

Sung in English as 'Vain illusion! When I believed her’


“A strong voice, varied repertoire and vivid characterization make this an appealing disc” Gramophone Magazine

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