Supraphon – up to 30% off

Music from 18th Century Prague

Prices shown exclude VAT. (UK tax is not payable for deliveries to United States.)
See Terms & Conditions for p&p rates.

Prague – Vienna: Journey in Songs

Prague – Vienna: Journey in Songs


Haydn:

O Tuneful Voice, Hob. XXVIa:42

The Spirit's Song, Hob. XXVIa:41

Kalliwoda:

Fruhlings Wanderschaft

Koželuh, J A:

Sento amor

Spira pur

Mozart:

Abendempfindung an Laura, K523

Als Luise die Briefe, K520

Das Veilchen, K476

Rösler:

An die Entfernte

Arietta Il niente

Herbstlied

Tomásek:

An den Mond, Op. 56

Vorisek:

An Sie

Die Abschiedsträne

Liebe


Martina Janková (soprano), Barbara Maria Willi (fortepiano)

The road between Vienna and Prague, taken in 1787 by the 31- year-old Mozart so as to attend the premiere of his opera Don Giovanni, was familiar to a number of other musicians. It was a journey they made in both directions, often with the vision of attaining a better life at the other end.

The Czech songs dating from the turn of the 18th and 19th centuries, which form the axis of the present album, may be a revelation for many a listener – as may be the fact that Czech

composers mainly set to music German and Italian texts. Leopold Koželuch was one of Vienna’s most successful song composers, and, owing to, among other things, his diplomatic skills, he even eclipsed the bright star of Mozart. The Prague-based composer F. A. Rösler, whose songs are often indistinguishable from those of Mozart’s, did his utmost to preserve Mozart’s legacy following his death. And similarly to Rösler, V. J. Tomášek, who too remained faithful to Prague, possessed a refined literary taste, as duly reflected in his selection of the texts for his songs.

The recording captures Martina Janková’s engrossing voice, replete with vitality, innocence, vigour and lightness, which so becomes the Mozart repertoire. Under the hands of Barbara Maria Willi, the bright and colourful sound of the one and only preserved fortepiano built by F. J. Baumeister (1797) will be for many yet another surprise and discovery on this musical odyssey.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU42312

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $13.50

(also available to download from $10.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Tomasek: Fortepiano Sonatas

Tomasek: Fortepiano Sonatas

Recorded at the Chateau Příchovice, Přeštice 30 October - 1 November, 2016


Tomásek:

Piano Sonata in E flat major, Op. 13

Piano Sonata in C major, Op. 14

Piano Sonata in A major, Op. 26


Petra Matějová (fortepiano)

With Václav Jan Tomášek we find ourselves at the furthermost border marking the realm of the Music from 18th Century Prague cycle. Without his music, however, the edition would not have been complete. Shortly after his arrival in Prague, Tomášek became renowned for his piano playing skills, later winning the moniker of the “Music Pope”. Not only was he an outstanding pianist and fruitful composer, but he also became a sought-after music teacher. His students included composer Jan Václav Hugo Voříšek, famous critic Eduard Hanslick as well as a number of virtuoso pianists.

Tomášek’s music oscillates between late classicist and early romantic style with songs and piano compositions making the bulk of his oeuvre. Sadly, only a little fragment of these are accessible on recordings. The present recording brings three out of his seven fortepiano sonatas (composed between 1799 and 1806); they are performed on a copy of a period instrument. Tomášek’s sonatas are marked by a profuseness of musical ideas and often also unusual modulation plans. Since her fortepiano studies in Paris, Petra Matějová has performed extensively, made a number of recordings and led master classes in several European countries. Her ambition in making this recording was to convince listeners and pianists alike that the time has come to bring Tomášek’s work to new life and give it back its well-deserved place on concert stages.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU42232

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $13.50

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Zach: Requiem & Vesperae de Beata Virgine

Zach: Requiem & Vesperae de Beata Virgine


Zach:

Requiem solemne in C minor

Vesperae de Beata Virgine


Michaela Srumova (soprano), Sylva Cmugrova (alto), Cenek Svoboda (tenor) & Jaromir Nosek (bass)

Musica Florea & Collegium Floreum, Marek Stryncl

Jan Zach, a new name in this series, ranks among the "Czech music migrants" of the 18th century. However, before leaving war-struck Bohemia in 1741, when he was twenty-eight years old, he had already composed a substantial amount of music. The focus of his work lies in liturgical music - the text of the Requiem mass alone was set to music by Zach three times. His Requiem solemne in C minor was one of the most frequently performed Requiems on Prague church choirs (a fact witnessed by a great number of surviving copies) and could still be heard as late as the 20th century. Today's audiences can listen to this mass as a resounding textbook of compositional styles used at the time and admire Zach's impressive array of stylistic elements, ranging from strict counterpoint to modern coloratura arias. His Vesperae de Beata Virgine (introduced here in a latterday premiere) were also widely used in Prague in Zach's time. Here we can already trace the first echoes of the style of the Viennese classicist school. Both works give us an idea of music that sounded in newly-built Prague churches in the 1730s. Members of the internationally renowned ensemble Musica Florea have accomplished this premiere with their characteristic lively engagement.

“The performers respond to this volatile music with singing and playing that is well-focused and compellingly expressive. Both works are well worth investigating, but the Vespers are a real find.” BBC Music Magazine, April 2017 ***

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU42092

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Jiránek: Music from Eighteenth-Century Prague

Jiránek: Music from Eighteenth-Century Prague


Jiránek:

Oboe Concerto in B flat, JK17

Bassoon Concerto in G minor

Flute Concerto in D, JK11

Oboe Concerto in F, JK15

Triple Concerto in A, JK22


Sergio Azzolini (bassoon), Xenia Loffler (oboe), Jana Semeradova (transverse flute), Lenka Torgersen (violin), Vojtech Semerad (viola d’amore)

Collegium Marianum, Jana Semeradova

It was not long before the baroque composer and violinist in Count Morzin's court orchestra, František Jiránek, received the moniker of a "Czech Vivaldi". Musicologists discovered him only recently and his works are gradually being identified, as his authorship is disputable in some cases. This is because Jiránek was a gifted pupil of his teacher in Venice and his works thus bear strong Vivaldian influence. Musicians are also becoming more and more enthusiastic about the newly discovered composer - besides the ensemble of Jana Semerádová, his promoters include the phenomenal bassoonist Sergio Azzolini, whose unique recording of Jiránek's concertos (SU40392) was received with great acclaim, and the renowned oboist Xenia Löffler. Despite all unclearness in the attribution of the works and some unusual features (such as the incorporation of the rarely used viola d'amore into Jiránek's Triple Concerto in A major), listeners are certain to find lively and virtuosic music on this recording of hitherto unheard compositions in top-class interpretations: a truly opulent baroque feast.

“Collegium Marianum…play with punch and attention to detail” Gramophone Magazine, March 2017

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU42082

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Benda: Sonatas, Sonatinas & Songs

Benda: Sonatas, Sonatinas & Songs

Music from Eighteenth-Century Prague


includes:

Benda, G:

Du, kleine, Blondine

Ein Madchen, das auf Ehre hielt (romanze)

Heraklit, gleich stumpfen Greisen

Hupft, ihr wollenreichen Herden

Ich liebte nur Ismenen

Mein Geliebter hat versprochen

Mir Armen, den des Fiebers Kraft

Mit Lauretten, seiner Freude


Edita Keglerová (harpsichord), Ivana Bilej Brouková (soprano), Helena Zemanová (violin), Hana Fleková, Marek Štryncl (cello)

Jiří Antonín Benda spent his prime years at King Friedrich II’s court orchestra in Berlin and serving as court Kapellmeister in Gotha, yet his works were an integral part of 18th century Prague’s musical landscape. The Czech capital frequently hosted performances of his singspiels, while prints of his compositions were in high demand too. Benda was best known for his melodramas and singspiels, whose novel and striking forcibility even enthralled the young Mozart (“You know that Benda has always been my favourite Lutheran Kapellmeister,” wrote Wolfgang to this father). The greatest impact on Benda’s keyboard music was made by his Berlin colleague Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach. The first of the six volumes of Benda’s “Sammlung” was published in 1780. Besides sonatas and sonatinas for “piano” (meaning any keyboard instrument, most frequently the harpsichord), the collection contained arias from church pieces, sonatas for several instruments, and songs. It was an extraordinary success and when it comes to the number of subscribers, it even outstripped C. P. E. Bach’s similarly conceived collection of sonatas, which started to be published a year earlier.

Benda’s music is enchanting in its simplicity, impressive expression, gallantry and wit. The artists who made this recording have immersed themselves in Benda’s musical universe and, bringing to bear their ample performing experience, have succeeded in relaying its irresistible charm.

“Blandness sometimes threatens, even more so in the featherweight sonatinas, though even at his most compliant Benda can trip you up with a disorientating pause, or surprise harmonic twist.” Gramophone Magazine, September 2015

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU41842

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Josef Antonin Sehling: Music From 18th Century Prague

Josef Antonin Sehling: Music From 18th Century Prague

Recorded in Church of Virgin Mary under the Chain, Prague, 2014


Fux:

Sonata pastorale a tre, K397

Sehling:

Rorate Primo

Aria per Adventu Domini 'Donner und Hagel'

Rorate Secondo

Mottetto per la Nativita di Nostro Signore 'Deponite metum'

Vis ingens est favori

Mottetto per la Nativita di Nostro Signore 'Dormi nate, mi mellite'

Pastorella 'Eja laeti properemus'

Pastorella 'Eja surgite pastores'

Pastorella 'Non sic cervus ad fluentem'

Aria per ogni festivita 'Vos stellae preclarae'

Pastorella 'Dormi tenellule'

Offertorium de Sanctis Tribus Regis 'Ecce magi veniunt'


Hana Blazikova (soprano), Marketa Cukrova (alto), Tomas Kral (baritone)

Collegium Marianum, Jana Semeradova

Precious few countries can boast of a Christmas repertoire as ample and colourful as that possessed by the Czech Republic.

The Baroque era imbued the texts of songs with enchanting, tender poetics - with awestruck yet perplexed shepherds enthusing about the beautiful infant Jesus. Later on, a growing number of formally more complex pieces (pastorales) were written, most of them taking the form of arias or duets with instrumental accompaniment. A notable composer in this respect was Josef Antonin Sehling.

Although still anchored in the Baroque world, he paved the way for the accession of a new musical style. He studied in Vienna and subsequently worked in Prague as a member of Count Vaclav Morzin's renowned orchestra and as second violin at Saint Vitus Cathedral, although standing in as Kapellmeister over the long term (an interesting parallel can be drawn with Zelenka, the 'counter-bassist' at the court orchestra in Dresden).

Sehling was Kapellmeister of several Prague churches, including the Church of Our Lady under the Chain, where the present world premiere recording was made. The album features pieces intended for the period from Advent to Epiphany.

Sehling's music contains the magic of Michna's songs yet concurrently opens upon a world familiar from Ryba's Christmas Mass.

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU41742

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $10.50

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

Zelenka & Tůma: Music From 18th Century Prague

Zelenka & Tůma: Music From 18th Century Prague


Orschler:

Sonata in F for Two Violins and Basso continuo

Tùma:

Stabat Mater in G minor

Zelenka:

Sanctus et Agnus Dei in D minor ZWV36

Sanctus et Agnus Dei ex Missa Nigra sum a 4 in G minor ZWV34


Collegium 1704 & Collegium Vocale 1704, Václav Luks

Recorded at the Domovina Studio, Prague, November 8-10 and December 3, 2013.

An inherent, characteristic feature of the musical language of Zelenka and Tůma, the two most distinguished Czech Baroque composers, is perfectly mastered counterpoint, which alongside progressive trends in Baroque continued to live as a stile antico. Zelenka, Tůma, as well as their currently virtually unknown contemporary J. G. Orschler, studied in Vienna with the Imperial Kapellmeister Johann Joseph Fux (1660-1741). All three had strong Prague links and although they mainly gained recognition beyond the Czech lands, their music was performed and highly valued in Prague too. Zelenka’s stile antico pieces represent a little-known yet interesting part of his oeuvre. Tůma’s Stabat Mater is a masterpiece bearing witness to the transformation of the “old craft” into a new pre-Classicist style. The recording, made by the internationally renowned Collegium 1704 ensemble, includes several modern-time premieres providing us with a fascinating view of the little-known works by the three Czech Baroque masters.

“The laments of 'choral' lamentation, surprisingly galant passages and solemn fugues are revealed beautifully and accompanied with tastefulness by a continuo group that varies its colours unobtrusively.” Gramophone Magazine, August 2014

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU41602

(CD)

Normally: $15.00

Special: $12.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Il Violino Boemo

Il Violino Boemo

Violin Sonatas by Benda, Gurecky & Jiranek


 

Sonata in A major

(Lee 3.107, Graun WV B.XVII.56)

Benda, Franz:

Sonata in B flat major (Lee III-124)

Sonata in C minor (Lee III-15)

Gurecký:

Sonata in D major

Jiránek:

Sonata in F major (Jk 29)

Sonata in C major (Jk 28)


Lenka Torgersen (violin), Václav Luks (harpsichord) & Libor Mašek (cello)

Recorded in the Church of Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren in Prague – Vinohrady, August 15-17, 2013.

The CD’s title, a paraphrase of Josef Mysliveček’s nickname, Il divino Boemo, aptly characterises the theme of the recording: the 18th-century violin virtuosos/composers hailing from the Czech lands. The most distinguished of them, whose influence was compared to that of Tartini’s, was František Benda. Although inspired by Vivaldi, he created his own singular performance style, which was even lauded by the famous English music historian Charles Burney. The CD features sonatas preserved in Prague in period copies. Also contained on the recording are overlooked pieces by composers virtually unknown until recently. František Jiránek’s life is linked with Count Václav Morzin’s celebrated orchestra, as well as Antonio Vivaldi himself. Another discovery is the sonata by J. A. Gurecký. Owing to the masterful and refined performance of the violinist Lenka Torgersen and the spellbinding accompaniment of the harpsichordist Václav Luks (also the conductor of Collegium 1704), the album presents to us the fascinating world of Czech violin virtuosos – a colourful, tender and beautiful world. Virtuoso and gallant – the fascinating world of the most celebrated Czech 18th-century violinists.

“Using a 1760 Klotz violin with a dark ochre hue, [Torgersen] produces a subtle messa di voce effect on many notes, which is a stylistic feature that may surprise (or even displease) those used to modern instruments and techniques. Her sensitive phrasing and wide range of tasteful ornamentation are also delightful.” International Record Review, May 2014

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU41512

(CD)

Normally: $14.00

Special: $11.62

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

Musici da Camera

Musici da Camera


Fasch, J F:

Quartet in D major for Flute, Violin, Bassoon and Basso continuo (FaWV N:D1)

Concerto in C major for Flute, Violin, Bassoon and Basso continuo (FaWV L:C3)

Jiránek:

Trio sonata in B flat major for Two Violins and Basso continuo, Jk 27

Orschler:

Trio in F minor for Two Violins and Basso continuo

Postel:

Trio sonata in A major for Two Violins and Basso continuo

Reichenauer:

Quartet in G minor for Violin, Cello, Bassoon and Basso continuo, Rk 18


Sergio Azzolini (bassoon), Lenka Torgersen (violin) & Helena Zemanova (violin)

Collegium Marianum (on period instruments), Jana Semeradova (artistic direction)

Recorded in the Church of Our Lady, Queen of Angels in Prague, July 2012 (CD1), June 2003 and September 2005 (CD2).

Whereas Vivaldi needs no introduction whatsoever and other names (Caldara, Fasch, Tůma) are familiar to lovers of Baroque music, even specialists have only been getting to know the remarkable oeuvres of Reichenauer and Jiránek over the past few years, owing in large part to Supraphon’s Music From Eighteenth-Century Prague series.

Prague is that which all these composers had in common; for some of them the city represented a significant part of their career, for others a short episode or merely a way station. The Czech capital was a melting pot in which Dresden, Vienna, Naples and Venice came together and the influences of all the major European musical centres were recast. In aristocrats’ exquisite palaces, and to the delight of their masters, these superlative artists performed their own chamber music, whose originality and splendour we can rediscover today. The CD blends the refinement and spontaneous musicality of the renowned Collegium Marianum with the Italian vivacity of their special guest, the phenomenal bassoonist Sergio Azzolini.

The splendour and refinement of the music that resounded in Prague Baroque palaces.

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU41122

(CD - 2 discs)

Normally: $23.75

Special: $16.62

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Zelenka: Missa Nativitatis Domini

Zelenka: Missa Nativitatis Domini


Zelenka:

Magnificat in C, ZWV107

O magnum mysterium. Motetto pro Nativitate, ZWV171

Missa Nativitatis Domini in D major, ZWV8

Chvalte Boha silného. Motetto (Ps 150), ZWV165


Barbora Sojková (soprano), Markéta Cukrová (alto) & Tomáš Král (bass)

Musica Florea (on period instruments), Marek Štryncl

Lesser-known works of Jan Dismas Zelenka – music (not only) for Advent and Christmas.

Following on from the previous two titles (Sepolcri, SU40682; Melodrama de Sancto Wenceslao, SU41132), Supraphon’s Music From Eighteenth-Century Prague series now reflects Prague-related works by Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679–1745), whose pieces were performed at the city’s churches with increasing frequency from the middle of the 1730s.

One such composition was Missa nativitatis, ZWV 8, preserved at the Saint Nicolas Church in Prague’s Lesser Town; another copy is from C. Ph. E. Bach’s personal effects, which indicates that this very piece was one of the two Zelenka masses his father Johann Sebastian had in his library.

The aria of the Christmas motet O magnum mysterium is derived from the mentioned melodrama; Zelenka furnished it with a different text and added two flutes. The motet Chvalte Boha silného (Praise God Almighty), a setting of Psalm 150, is most likely the one and only Zelenka piece to a Czech text and has only been preserved in Prague copies.

The Advent spirit is supplemented by with the Marian hymn Magnificat. Zelenka’s lesser-known works are once again presented within the acclaimed Supraphon series by Musica Florea, a renowned Baroque orchestra who stood at the beginning of the modern discovery of this exceptional composer.

“It is hugely persuasive music and is performed here by the period instrument group Musica Florea under Marek Štryncl with real tenderness and commitment. Soloists and choir are in good voice, and the disc also contains a couple of world premières.” Chris O'Reilly, Presto Classical, 3rd December 2012

Presto Disc of the Week

3rd December 2012

Supraphon - up to 30% off

Supraphon Music From 18th Century Prague - SU41112

(CD)

Normally: $14.00

Special: $11.62

(also available to download from $10.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Page: 

1 2

 Next >>

Copyright © 2002-17 Presto Classical Limited, all rights reserved.