Bach, J S: Sonatas & Partitas for solo violin, BWV1001-1006

Hänssler: HAEN98250

Prices shown exclude VAT. (UK tax is not payable for deliveries to United States.)
See Terms & Conditions for p&p rates.
Bach, J S: Sonatas & Partitas for solo violin, BWV1001-1006

Awards:

Gramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - August 2007

Label:

Hänssler

Catalogue No:

HAEN98250
(CD 98.250)

Discs:

2

Release date:

1st April 2007

Barcode:

4010276018643

Length:

2 hours 9 minutes

Medium:

CD (download also available)
| Share

Bach, J S: Sonatas & Partitas for solo violin, BWV1001-1006


CD - 2 discs

$28.25

(also available to download from $20.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001

I. Adagio

II. Fuga. Allegro

III. Siciliana

IV. Presto

Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Partita No. 1 in B minor, BWV 1002

I. Allemanda

II. Double

III. Corrente

IV. Double. Presto

V. Sarabanda

VI. Double

VII. Tempo di Bourree

VIII. Double

Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Sonata No. 2 in A minor, BWV 1003

I. Grave

II. Fuga

III. Andante

IV. Allegro

Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004

I. Allemanda

II. Corrente

III. Sarabanda

IV. Giga

V. Ciaccona

Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Sonata No. 3 in C major, BWV 1005

I. Adagio

II. Fuga

III. Largo

IV. Allegro assai

Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Partita No. 3 in E major, BWV 1006

I. Preludio

II. Loure

III. Gavotte en Rondeau

IV. Menuet I

V. Menuet II

VI. Bourree

VII. Giga

Gramophone Magazine

August 2007

“Christian Tetzlaff, always one of the most thoughtful, imaginative violinists, has obviously found Bach's solo works a stimulating and rewarding challenge. Technically, he's most impressive: using a modern bow, he can achieve, with each phrase, the kind of subtle give and take that's normally the preserve of the best Baroque violinists. The performances have a remarkable air of spontaneity, the result of a pervasive rubato, especially notable in the ornamental opening movements of the first two sonatas, and in the freer sections of the Chaconne. ...it's notable how Tetzlaff realises the virtuosity of Bach's violin writing - the moto perpetuo finales of the sonatas sound truly thrilling, full of temperament and fire.”

BBC Music Magazine

September 2007

****

“At some point… every great violinist must square up to the Bach Solo Sonatas and Partitas. Tetzlaff has finally bitten the bullet - magnificently. Among other modern instrumental versions Julia Fischer's 2004 recording… sets much store in maintaining an even beauty of tone. Tetzlaff is edgier. He takes more risks, probes deeper, shows greater stylistic awareness and is refreshingly rooted in the rhetoric of the dance movements which lend a French accent to the Partitas...”

Gramophone Classical Music Guide

2010

“Christian Tetzlaff, always one of the most thoughtful, imaginative violinists, has obviously found Bach's solo works a stimulating and rewarding challenge. Technically, he's most impressive: using a modern bow, he can achieve, with each phrase, the kind of subtle give and take that's normally the preserve of the best Baroque violinists. His chord playing, too, shows wonderful control; in the more densely polyphonic pieces – the Chaconne and the fugues in the three sonatas – it seems there's often little choice between aggressive accentuation and rhythmic distortion caused by spreading the chords. Tetzlaff, however, manages to avoid both pitfalls, with varied arpeggiation that never fails to take account of the music's rhythmic requirements.
The performances have a remarkable air of spontaneity, the result of a pervasive rubato, especially notable in the ornamented opening movements of the first two sonatas, and in the freer sections of the Chaconne. There's a sense of line and balance that ensures that each departure from metronomic regularity sounds entirely natural, unlocking the music's expressive potential. This is even felt when, in a few movements in the partitas, the dance character suggests a more regular, metrical pulse. Apart from this, it's notable how Tetzlaff realises the virtuosity of Bach's violin writing – the moto perpetuo finales of the sonatas sound truly thrilling, full of temperament and fire. Do investigate this outstanding set.”

Choose Format:

What is MP3 and FLAC?

Click here for alternative recordings of this work.

Copyright © 2002-17 Presto Classical Limited, all rights reserved.