Volume 20 - Poets of Sensibility Volume 3

Naxos: 8557568

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Volume 20 - Poets of Sensibility Volume 3

Label:

Naxos

Catalogue No:

8557568
(8.557568)

Discs:

1

Release date:

28th Nov 2005

Barcode:

0747313256822

Length:

60 minutes

Medium:

CD (download also available)
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Volume 20 - Poets of Sensibility Volume 3


Schubert:

Der Tod und das Mädchen, D531

Der Leidende D432 (poet unknown)

Totengräberlied, D44 (Hölty)

Die Mutter Erde, D788 (Stolberg)

Die Nonne, D208 (Holty)

Taglich zu singen, D533 (Claudius)

Klage D415 (Matthisson)

Stimme der Liebe D412 (Stolberg)

Seufzer D198 (Holty)

An eine Quelle D530 (Claudius)

An die Apfelbaume D197 (Holty)

Die frühe Liebe D430 (Holty)

An den Mond, D193

Abendlied D499 (Claudius)

Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall D201 (Holty)

Auf dem Wasser zu singen, D774

Lied in der Abwesenheit D416 (Stolberg)

Der Liebende D207 (Holty)

Minnelied D429 (Holty)

Der Traum D213 (Holty)

Seligkeit D433 (Holty)

Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall D399 (Holty)


Wolfgang Holzmair (baritone), Ulrich Eisenlohr (fortepiano)

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Franz Schubert: Der Tod und das Madchen, Op. 7, No. 3, D. 531

Der Tod und das Madchen, D. 531

Franz Schubert: Der Leidende, D. 432b

Der Leidende (3rd setting), D. 432c

Franz Schubert: Totengraberlied, D. 44 (2nd setting)

Totengraberlied, D. 44

Franz Schubert: Lied, D. 788, "Die Mutter Erde"

Lied, "Die Mutter Erde" (Des Lebens Tag...), D. 788

Franz Schubert: Der Leidende, D. 432a

Der Leidende (2nd setting), D. 432b

Franz Schubert: Die Nonne, D. 208

Die Nonne, D. 208

Franz Schubert: Taglich zu singen, D. 533

Taglich zu singen D. 533

Franz Schubert: Klage (Trauer umfliesst mein Leben), D. 371

Klage (Trauer umfliesst mein Leben), D. 371

Franz Schubert: Stimme der Liebe, D. 412

Stimme der Liebe, D. 412

Franz Schubert: Seufzer, D. 198

Seufzer, D. 198

Franz Schubert: An eine Quelle, Op. 109, No. 3, D. 530

An eine Quelle, D. 530

Franz Schubert: An die Apfelbaume, wo ich Julien erblickte, D. 197

An die Apfelbaume, wo ich Julien erblickte, D. 197

Franz Schubert: Die fruhe Liebe, D. 430

Die fruhe Liebe, D. 430

Franz Schubert: An den Mond, Op. 57, No. 3, D. 193

An den Mond (Geuss lieber Mond), D. 193

Franz Schubert: Abendlied, D. 499

Abendlied (Der Mond ist aufgegangen), D. 499

Franz Schubert: Klage (Dein Silber schien durch Eichengrun), D. 436

Klage (Dein Silber schien durch Eichengrun), D. 436

Franz Schubert: Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall, D. 201 (1st setting)

Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall (1st setting) - fragment, D. 201a

Franz Schubert: Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall, D. 399 (2nd setting)

Auf den Tod einer Nachtigall (2nd setting), D. 399b

Franz Schubert: Auf dem Wasser zu singen, Op. 72, D. 774

Auf dem Wasser zu singen, D. 774

Franz Schubert: Lied in der Abwesenheit, D. 416 (fragment)

Lied in der Abwesenheit - fragment, D. 416

Franz Schubert: Der Liebende, D. 207

Der Liebende, D. 207

Franz Schubert: Minnelied, D. 429

Minnelied, D. 429

Franz Schubert: Der Traum, Op. 172, No. 1, D. 213

Der Traum, D. 213

Franz Schubert: Seligkeit, D. 433

Seligkeit, D. 433

Gramophone Classical Music Guide

2010

“The pre-Romantic poets of Empfindsamkeit ('sensibility'), represented here by Hölty, Claudius and Stolberg, inspired a handful of famous Schubert settings alongside dozens of songs that are still too little known. Die Mutter Erde, for instance, written when the composer was suffering from the first symptoms of syphilis, is quintessentially Schubertian in its mingled grandeur, serenity and yearning; Stimme der Liebe, dating from 1816 but sounding 10 years later, is one of his most poignant and intense love songs (a reflection of his failed affair with Therese Grob?); An die Apfelbäume is a bel canto melody of delicious sensuous grace. Elsewhere we have what must be the jolliest song ever about death (Toten-gräberlied), a pair of solemnly archaic hymns, and charming Haydnesque settings of poems in that faintly risqué (and, to us, impossibly coy) vein beloved of the 18th century.
As ever, Wolfgang Holzmair, with his plangent, tenorish (and distinctly Viennese) timbre, is a highly sympathetic Schubertian, scrupulous in enunciation, always sensitive to mood and nuance yet never prone to exaggeration. Where darker, deeper voices make Death in Der Todund das Mädchen a solemn, hieratic figure, Holzmair intones Death's chant with a gentle beneficence.
The many songs of pathos or wistful longing – say, Der Leidende or the exquisite Seufzer – suit Holzmair to perfection. He brings an unforced variety to the successive verses of strophic settings like Abendlied (another littleknown gem), finds the vocal equivalent of a twinkle in the eye for Der Traum (marked to be sung 'flirtatiously'), and even compels you to listen in the potentially absurd ballad Die Nonne, in which a nun of fiery Latin temperament turns murderess. Holzmair understands, too, the virtue of simplicity in early Schubert.
Reservations? Well, these days Holzmair sounds a touch strained at high-lying climaxes; and while he can spin a true legato, his line can on occasion be slightly bumpy, as in an otherwise touching (and unusually reflective) Auf demWasser zu singen. But there is nothing to detract seriously from enjoyment of a shrewdly planned recital that begins in the grip of Death and ends with an exuberant affirmation of life's pleasures (Seligkeit). Ulrich Eisenlohr is a discerning partner, drawing an array of delicate, evocative sonorities from his 1820s fortepiano, including (in, for instance, An den Mond) a hazy con sordino (muted) resonance impossible to conjure on a modern grand. Naxos provide texts and translations via their website.”

Gramophone Magazine

March 2006

“As ever, Wolfgang Holzmair, with his plangent, tenorish (and distinctly Viennese) timbre, is a highly sympathetic Schubertian, scrupulous in enunciation, always sensitive to mood and nuance yet never prone to exaggeration. The many songs of pathos or wistful longing - say, Der Leidende or the exquisite Seufzer - suit Holzmair to perfection. Ulrich Eisenlohr is a discerning partner, drawing an array of delicate, evocative sonorities from his 1820s fortepiano.”

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