Strauss, R: Salome

Opus Arte: OABD7069D

Prices shown exclude VAT. (UK tax is not payable for deliveries to United States.)
See Terms & Conditions for p&p rates.
Strauss, R: Salome

Label:

Opus Arte

Catalogue No:

OABD7069D

Discs:

1

Release date:

1st June 2010

Barcode:

0809478070696

Medium:

Blu-ray

Region:

all
| Share

Strauss, R: Salome

Recorded live at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden in March 2008.


Nadja Michael (Salome), Michaela Schuster (Herodias), Thomas Moser (Herod), Michael Volle (Jokanaan), Joseph Kaiser (Narraboth)

The Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Philippe Jordan (conductor) & David McVicar (stage director)

Blu-ray

$42.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

David McVicar’s powerful 2008 production of Oscar Wilde’s bible-based drama takes the controversially disturbing film Salò as its visual reference, setting it in a debauched palace in Nazi Germany. Strauss’s ravishing and voluptuous score adds to the sexual alchemy conjured by an international cast led by Nadja Michael in the title role. Filmed for the big screen with High Definition cameras and recorded in true surround sound.

Warning: Contains nudity and scenes of violence.

Bonus material:

Synopsis

Cast gallery

David McVicar: A work in process – a full ITV documentary on David McVicar and his work on Salome, with unique interviews and extensive backstage footage (itv Productions)

Running time 169 mins

Region code All regions

Video codec: AVC/MPEG-4

Disc size: BD50

Picture format 1080i High Definition / 16:9

Sound format 2.0 PCM & 5.0 DTS Master Audio

Menu language EN

Subtitles EN/FR/DE/ES/IT

BBC Music Magazine

November 2008

****

“The only ideal voice to be heard is the first, Joseph Kaiser's as an angelic-sounding Narraboth; but most shortcomings are overridden by Jonathan Haswell's accomplished filming. McVicar's energetic, slightly scary part in all this, as actor and designer manqué, comes across entertainingly in the 50-minute documentary.”

Gramophone Classical Music Guide

2010

“For all its nudity and gore Salome ends the evening in a white petticoat red with blood (mostly from the executioner) – this is a conventional production which lays out the story straightforwardly. It is based on Pasolini's film Salo which gives us the 1930s setting and 'decadent' extras (who could be much more animated) standing around watching an everyday story of the Herods. Es Devlin's handsome set shows us Herod's banquet in progress upstairs in addition to the main area of the basement, and becomes nicely mobile during a Dance in Seven Rooms (which, according to the accompanying documentary, depicts Salome's abused upbringing). Nadja Michael has become in short order Europe's Number One not-quite-hochdramatische choice for physically demanding productions. She is an attractive Salome, moving like a dancer, as physically unafraid as she is vocally – and this tricky sing, with its ferocious tuning, suits her. Michael Volle is an imposing, richtoned [Jokanaan], given little to do but emote about Jesus. Both these German artists make a considerable impact through their own voices and physicality – but it is Thomas Moser's weakly human Herod who emerges as the most truly lived-in character. Philippe Jordan seems to have balanced his orchestra extremely well for both house and cast and is especially alert to the most modern twists of Strauss's harmonies. The filming (Jonathan Haswell) is sensitive to David McVicar's work while being much more than merely a static record”

Gramophone Magazine

February 2009

“Nadia Michael… is an attractive Salome, moving like a dancer, as physically unafraid as she is vocally… Michael Volle is an imposing, rich-toned Narraboth… but it is Thomas Moser's weakly human Herod who emerges as the most truly lived-in character. Philippe Jordan seems... especially alert to the most modern twists of Strauss's harmonies. The filming (Jonathan Haswell) is sensitive to David McVicar's work while being much more than merely a static record.”

Penguin Guide

2010 edition

**

“The colourful sets amplify the decadence, and Salome's dance is sensuously managed. Michael's Salome can sing and dance with comparable flair and accuracy. Thomas Moser's Herod is genuinely moving...The orchestra plays splendidly under Philippe Jordan”

Click here for alternative recordings of this work.

Copyright © 2002-14 Presto Classical Limited, all rights reserved.