Bartók: Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119

This page lists all recordings of Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119, by Béla Bartók (1881-1945) on CD, DVD & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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Stravinsky: The Firebird

Stravinsky: The Firebird


Bartók:

Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119

Yefim Bronfman (piano)

The Miraculous Mandarin, Op. 19, Sz. 73 (suite)

Prokofiev:

Romeo and Juliet - Suite No. 2, Op. 64b (excerpts)

Stravinsky:

The Firebird


On 24th October 2015 at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Valery Gergiev took to the rostrum for his penultimate concert as Principal Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra. An explosive programme of Stravinsky, Bartók and Prokofiev - repertoire that always fires Gergiev’s imagination - this live recording captures a major milestone in the Orchestra’s history.

Stravinsky’s Firebird was an instant hit with audience and critics alike at its 1910 premiere it is a constant in Gergiev’s repertoire.

Piano Concerto No 3 is Bartók’s final work, completed only four days before he succumbed to a long battle with leukaemia. The New York Times found Yefim Bronfman’s interpretation of Piano Concerto No 3 "brilliantly charismatic" and he is an acknowledged master of the great Hungarian’s music, winning a Grammy award for his 2009 recording of all three Bartók Piano Concertos. A story of prostitution and violence, 'The Miraculous Mandarin', performed here in the suite version, is dramatic, mysterious and sinister. Incredibly entertaining, it’s now one of Bartók’s most well-known works and never fails to lure the listener into a deep, dark world of seduction and horror. The LSO’s performance of the work on tour was met with critical acclaim: Closing the album is the encore from the concert, excerpts from Prokofiev’s incredibly popular ballet 'Romeo & Juliet'. That Gergiev chose this work to close his farewell concerts is not surprising, as the music and its composer have special signficance for the conductor and for the LSO. 2016 sees the world mark the 125th anniversary of Prokofiev’s birth and Gergiev has long been a champion of the great Russian’s music. His award-winning recording of the complete score on LSO Live is among the best-selling on the label, winning BBC Music Magazine Best Orchestral recording of 2011.

“This one’s a cracker, a double-CD, recorded live in New Jersey by New York’s classical radio station, with the LSO on tour and Gergiev flying in repertoire he has made his own.” Herald Scotland, 2nd December 2016

“The three main works on offer plus the Prokofiev encore come across with clarity and balance … the performances themselves all show considerable boldness of style … the combination of largeness of scale and extreme tonal refinement in Yefim Bronfman’s solo Bartok playing is answered with wonderful specificity by conductor and orchestra. It’s a concert well worth recreating at home” BBC Music Magazine, February 2017 ****

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Tribute to Evgeny Svetlanov

Tribute to Evgeny Svetlanov


Bartók:

Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119

Yefim Bronfman (piano)

Prokofiev:

Seven, They are Seven Cantata, Op. 30

Poems (2) for female chorus and orchestra, Op. 7

Rachmaninov:

The Bells, Op. 35


Tatiana Pavlovskaya (soprano), Vsevolod Grivnov (tenor) & Sergei Leiferkus (baritone)

Yurlov State Academic Chorus & State Academic Symphony Orchestra of Russia, Vladimir Jurowski

Celebrating the 85th anniversary of the birth of the great Russian conductor Evgeny Svetlanov (1928-2002), this event was filmed in the magnificent room of the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory. Evgeny Svetlanov spent 35 years leading the Symphony Orchestra of the Russian Federation, today nicknamed ‘The Svetlanov’.

Conducted by Vladimir Jurowski, its new director, the concert gathers some of the most acclaimed artists: Yefim Bronfman, Tatiana Pavlovskaya, Vsevolod Grivnov and Sergei Leiferkus.

The programme is a selection of great pieces by Prokofiev, Bartók and Rachmaninov, among them The Bells.

Evgeny Svetlanov began and ended his career with one of his favourite works, Rachmaninov’s choral symphony The Bells. He chose it for his final exam at the Moscow Conservatory and conducted it just two weeks before his death.

Live HD recording: Great Hall of the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory, 06/09/2013

Directed for TV & video by Andy Sommer

Duration: 84 min.

Subtitles: FR / ENGL / GER / KOR

Video: 1 DVD9, colour, 16/9, NTSC

Audio: PCM Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1

“Apart from its virtues as a brilliant piece of programming…this concert should be snapped up by Prokofiev lovers. It’s been a long time since we’ve had an electric performance of his seismic 1917 invocation Seven, they are Seven, and there’s no contemporary recording to my knowledge of the Op. 7 Poems…here we have the best of Russian ensembles, the Yurlov State Academic Chorus, a reminder of vintage Soviet-era quality” BBC Music Magazine, March 2017 ****

“The Bells was a Svetlanov speciality…[and] Jurowski gets under its skin, drawing an intense, brooding performance…earning a disciplined response from the Yurlov State Academic Chorus. The soloists are very fine…Tatiana Pavlovskya’s ripe soprano is perfectly poised in the ‘Golden Bells’ movement” Gramophone Magazine, December 2016

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Bartók: Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)

Bartók: Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)


Géza Anda (piano)

Berlin R.S.O, Ferenc Fricsay

“The 'troubadour of the keyboard' offers a steel-fingered, characterful readings of Bartók's First and Second Concertos and atmospheric magic in the Third.” BBC Music Magazine, September 2014 ****

Alto - ALC1246

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Bartók: Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)

Bartók: Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)


This is the first concerto recording by Jean-Efflam Bavouzet for Chandos. Following the tremendous success of his complete Debussy piano music edition (‘This could well be the finest and most challenging of all Debussy piano cycles’ – Bryce Morrison, Gramophone) – which scooped awards from both Gramophone and BBC Music – and the launch of his ambitious Haydn Piano Sonatas series, the pianist now turns his attention to some of the mightiest concertos of the twentieth century. The three Bartók Piano Concertos on a single CD represents superb value for money.

Bartók wrote his First Concerto, one of his most challenging works, in 1926. The percussive piano writing ads much bite to the textures. The first movement is striking in its rhythmic vigour and dramatic character. The central Andante is essentially a dialogue between the soloist and four percussion players and features much atmospheric ‘Night Music’. In the finale, following without a break, the brilliant motoric rhythms of the first movement return, as does the dramatic use of percussion in a thrilling mêlée of sound.

The Second Concerto was first performed in 1933. The music is more melodically appealing and in the first movement, which is notably contrapuntal, the strings are silent throughout. The hushed slow movement on strings is interrupted half way through by a brilliant and startling scherzo, with a striking sequence of tremolos and note-clusters, before the haunting quiet mood of the opening returns. The finale, again with brilliant use of percussion (as well as brass), ends the work in virtuoso fashion.

The Third Concerto was written at the end of the composer’s life, in 1945, and is much more restrained than the previous piano concertos. The work is lighter, airy, and almost neo-classical compared to much of his earlier music. Unlike much of Bartók’s output, the piece was not composed on commission, but was rather created as a surprise birthday gift for Bartók’s second wife, Ditta Pásztory, who was, like Bartók, a skilled concert pianist. The two lively outer movements, full of the composer’s distinctive rhythmic drive, are separated by a slow movement of great beauty and serenity, with, again, a striking, contrasting middle section. The final seventeen bars were orchestrated by the composer’s pupil, Tibor Serly, after the composer’s death, based on Bartók’s notes.

“Both Bavouzet and the BBC Philharmonic with Gianandrea Noseda are outstanding in the First Concerto, capturing its epic scale and mixture of formality and barbarism...[These performances] generally have all the sweep, intensity and precision that these works demand.” The Guardian, 26th August 2010 ****

“In league with the finely honed BBC Philharmonic, these are performances vibrant in colour, vital in rhythm and detail and viscerally exciting in impact.” The Telegraph, 2nd September 2010 *****

“Bavouzet relishes the high-octane energy of the outer movements of the first two concertos but through his imaginatively varied use of colour manages to avoid the trap of making Bartók's percussive writing seem too relentless.” BBC Music Magazine, October 2010 *****

“Bavouzet's own energy and lightness make the most of the jubilant, rhythmic writing.. It's a beautifully nuanced performance, brimming over with variety of touch and dynamic...The orchestra match him in their deft lightness, brightness and virtuosity.” Charlotte Gardner, bbc.co.uk, 16/09/2010

“Bavouzet's interpretations are masculine, intelligent and direct. In most of the nine movements, he opts for unusually brisk tempos, though quick as they are, the music never sounds rushed or precipitous. Clarity invariably prevails and Noseda and the orchestra are equal partners at every turn...the overall effect is viscerally exhilarating.” International Record Review, October 2010

“If you're after a disc of Bartok's piano concertos that maximises on the music's drive, elegance and sparring potential, then you could hardly to better than his ear-catching new production...Bavouzet doesn't play down the music's earth-derived grandeur...or its drama.” Gramophone Magazine, Awards Issue 2010

“From the paranoid wranglings of the First Concerto to the helter-skelter glamour of the Second and the burlesque of the Third, the playing is first rate. Pianist Jean-Efflam Bavouzet delivers coruscating cadenza and locates an almost Beethovenian limpidity for the Adagio Religioso.” The Independent on Sunday, 17th October 2010

GGramophone Awards 2011

Finalist - Concerto

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - Awards Issue 2010

Building a Library

First Choice - November 2015

BBC Music Magazine

Orchestral Choice - October 2010

BBC Music Magazine Awards 2011

Orchestral Finalist

Chandos - CHAN10610

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Bartók - The Piano & Violin Concertos

Bartók - The Piano & Violin Concertos


Bartók:

Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)

First Release on CD

Pascal Rogé (piano)

London Symphony Orchestra, Walter Weller

Violin Concerto No. 1, BB48a, Sz 36

First Release on CD

Kyung Wha Chung (violin)

Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Sir Georg Solti

Violin Concerto No. 2, Sz 112

First Release on CD

Iona Brown (violin)

Philharmonia Orchestra, Simon Rattle

Two Portraits Op. 5

Chantal Juillet (violin)

Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, Charles Dutoit


This well-filled 2CD set – nearly 2 hours and 40 minutes long – presents Bartók’s major concertos (the Viola Concerto appears on another Eloquence CD released this month). The three Piano Concertos appear in muscular and sumptuously recorded performances (one of the finest examples of Decca’s 1970s engineering at the venerated Kingsway Hall) by Pascal Rogé and Walter Weller. Likewise, the Second Violin Concerto resurrects a long-buried 1980 Argo recording by the late Iona Brown, with none other than Sir Simon Rattle conducting. The First Violin Concerto, the result of an ultimately called-off love affair with Stefi Geyer, found its music rechannelled into the Two Portraits and in Kyung Wha Chung and Chantal Juillet, respectively, find two of the composer’s most persuasive advocates.

“Iona Brown gives a clean-cut and stylish performance, superbly recorded” Penguin Guide

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4802320

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Bartók & Ravel - Piano Concertos

Bartók & Ravel - Piano Concertos


Bartók:

Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119

Ravel:

Piano Concerto in G major


Recording made in 2008.

Booklet notes.

Klára Würtz studied with Zoltan Kocsis and Gyorgy Kurtag, and received a scholarship from András Schiff for his masterclasses at Prussia Cove, Cornwall, UK. She has since performed widely in the North America and Europe When Bartók started work on his Third and last piano concerto in 1944, he was already ill, and in exile in the United States. The following year he died, leaving the concerto almost complete. His pupil Tibor Serly completed the final bars using Bartók’s instructions. The concerto was premiered in 1946 and was an immediate success. Unlike much of his earlier work, the Third concerto like the Concerto for Orchestra shows a more approachable and less modernistic character. The public had balked at Bartók’s spiky and percussive music, and the comparatively warm, almost wistful romanticism of the Third concerto provides an ideal introduction to the composer. The work is the summation of his close relationship with the concertos of the classical and romantic period composers he admired – Mozart, Beethoven, Liszt and Richard Strauss. Ravel was determined to write just one work in each genre, and if he ever deviated from his rule, the resulting work in the same genre contrasted greatly with its companion. His two piano concertos were composed around 1930. The Concerto for the Left Hand is a very challenging work for the performer, and the mood is predominantly dark and brooding. In contrast the Concerto in G was described by Ravel as a divertissement, and he said that Mozart and Saint-Saëns provided the inspiration. Allied to these influences is Ravel’s love of jazz which can be detected in the first movement and the finale which frame a serene and beautiful slow movement.

Brilliant Classics - 9008

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Bartók: The Piano Concertos and Violin Concertos

Bartók: The Piano Concertos and Violin Concertos


Bartók:

Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)

Vladimir Ashkenazy (piano)

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Georg Solti

Violin Concerto No. 1, BB48a, Sz 36

Kyung Wha Chung (violin)

Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Georg Solti

Violin Concerto No. 2, Sz 112

Kyung Wha Chung (violin)

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Georg Solti


“the hushed intensity of the writing, as well as the biting Hungarian flavour, is caught superbly, thanks to Solti as well as to the soloist, and there is no sentimental lingering. In the Piano Concerto, the partnership between Ashkenazy and Solti works equally well.” Penguin Guide, 2011 edition

Decca - Double Decca - 4732712

(CD - 2 discs)

$12.50

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Bartók: Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)

Bartók: Piano Concertos Nos. 1, 2 & 3 (complete)


Géza Anda (piano)

Radio Symphony Orchestra Berlin, Ferenc Fricsay

“Much as you'd like to tout the new as the best, there are some older recordings where a very special chemistry spells 'definitive', and that pose an almost impossible challenge to subsequent rivals. Such is this 1959 recording of Bartók's Second Piano Concerto, a tough, playful, pianistically aristocratic performance where dialogue is consistently keen and spontaneity is captured on the wing (even throughout numerous sessions). The first movement is relentless but never tires the ear; the second displays two very different levels of tension, one slow and mysterious, the other hectic but controlled; and although others might have thrown off the finale's octaves with even greater abandon, Anda's performance is the most successful in suggesting savage aggression barely held in check.
The Third Concerto is again beautifully moulded and carefully thought through.
Moments such as the loving return from the second movement's chirpy central episode are quite unforgettable, while the finale is both nimble and full toned. The First Concerto was the last to be recorded and is perhaps the least successful of the three: here ensemble is occasionally loose, and characterisation less vivid than with some. Still, it's a fine performance and the current transfer has been lovingly effected.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

DG Originals - 4473992

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Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123, Sz.116, etc.

Bartók:

Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123, Sz.116

Dance Suite, BB 86, Sz. 77

Portrait No. 5 for Violin & Orchestra Sz37

Romanian Folk Dances for orchestra, Sz. 68, BB 76

Music for Strings, Percussion & Celesta, BB 114, Sz. 106

Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119


Ernest Ansermet's view of Bartok was a lyrical one and his incredible ear brought out lines, sonorities and shape in this music that have rarely been equalled. Here, collected together on CD for the first time, are his complete Bartok recordings for Decca as part of the ongoing 'Decca Ansermet Legacy' and they include some of his most famous orchestral works, with a first release on CD of the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, and a first international release of the other orchestral works. The Piano Concerto No. 3, released as part of the Ansermet volume in Decca's 'Original Masters', features Julius Katchen as soloist.

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4429989

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Elegy - Schoenberg, Bartok & Krenek

Elegy - Schoenberg, Bartok & Krenek


Bartók:

Piano Concerto No. 3, BB 127, Sz. 119

Krenek:

Symphonic Elegy, Op. 105

Schoenberg:

Piano Concerto, Op. 42

Accompaniment to a Cinematographic Scene, Op. 34


Pina Napolitano (piano)

Liepaja Symphony Orchestra, Atvars Lakstigala

Having received widespread acclaim for her disc of Schoenberg’s complete solo piano works, Pina Napolitano now brings her unique combination of fierce intellect and emotional insight to Schoenberg’s Piano Concerto, in her second disc for Odradek, entitled ELEGY, with the Liepaja Symphony Orchestra conducted by Atvars Lakstigala.

Programmed alongside Bartók’s Third Piano Concerto, Pina finds a common thread uniting the two concerti in their shared sense of nostalgia and in this nostalgia's redemption through dance. With characteristic perceptiveness, she explores their blend of the wistful and the joyous.

Reinforcing the album’s elegiac character, the Liepaja Symphony Orchestra performs Schoenberg’s Accompaniment to a Film-Scene, harkening “danger, fear, catastrophe”, followed by Krenek’s Symphonic Elegy. Three composers exiled by war, expressing sorrow for the world they left behind, tempered by their new experiences of America. It is a CD that explores pathos and loss, whilst managing to find joy amid the tears.

Schoenberg’s Piano Concerto uses his 12-tone method, yet there are many precedents referenced in the work, including Mozart, Beethoven, Liszt, and Brahms, as well as the expressionistic voice of his own past, from the Vienna he left behind. The Film Music belongs to this expressionistic period, and foreshadows the turmoil his land would see within a decade.

Schoenberg’s close contemporary Webern is poignantly commemorated in Krenek’s Symphonic Elegy. Webern was accidentally shot by an American soldier in 1945, and the Elegy unfolds as one continuous lamentation, at times Mahlerian in its emotional expressivity.

Bartók’s Third Piano Concerto was written during a time of turmoil for the composer: his career was languishing and his death was immanent. In the Third Concerto we find his rigorous writing softened with lyricism, particularly in the central Andante religioso, which alludes to Beethoven’s ‘holy thanksgiving’ from his Op.132. The dances which culminate in the final movement reference multiple styles and seem to summarize the history of music and the story of Bartók’s life, up until the final ascendant bars, which were completed by a student.

“Odradek’s excellent annotator Hugh Collins Rice remarks on the concerto’s combination of modernism and nostalgia, and aside from the frequent fluency of Napolitano’s playing, the excellent contribution from Latvia’s Liepaja Symphony Orchestra under Atvars Lakstigala and the superb sound – the col legno strings and big drums come off especially well – make a telling impression” Gramophone Magazine, February 2017

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Odradek Records - ODRCD339

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