Schubert: Schwanengesang, D957

This page lists all recordings of Schwanengesang, D957, by Franz Peter Schubert (1797-1828) on CD, SACD, DVD, Blu-ray & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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Schubert: Schwanengesang

Schubert: Schwanengesang


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Die Forelle, D550

Auf der Bruck, D853

Gruppe aus dem Tartarus, second version, D583 (Schiller)

An die Musik D547


James Rutherford (baritone) & Eugene Asti (piano)

Compared to Franz Schubert's two 'true' song cycles, Die schöne Müllerin and Winterreise, Schwanengesang poses far more questions – to performers, listeners and musicologists alike. It is in fact a compilation of two different sets of songs to texts by Ludwig Rellstab(seven songs) and Heinrich Heine (six). In his manuscript, dated August 1828, Schubert wrote out the songs without any title page or numbering. Following the composer's death three months later, the publisher Tobias Haslinger added the single song Die Taubenpost, written in October 1828, and brought out the posthumous collection entitled, appropriately, 'Swan Song'. How, or indeed if, Schubert himself intended to combine these songs, we do not know. The four miscellaneous songs which close this programme serve as a further demonstration of the astonishing versatility of their maker and his boundless musical resourcefulness. During the 15 years that they have collaborated on these songs, James Rutherford and Eugene Asti, have performed the cycle in many different formats, but for their recording of the collection they have decided to stay as close to the original as possible, with the exception of including Herbst, another Rellstab setting, from Schubert's final year. Schubert's manuscript is written for high voice, and Rutherford and Asti have chosen to transpose each song down a minor third – a seemingly obvious decision, but in fact this recording is one of the few, if not the only, by a baritone in which the original tonal relationships between the songs is retained.

“[James Rutherford] has at his disposal a wonderfully healthy and rounded bass-baritone voice…and his German is impeccable…the cycle has a slow-burn cumulative power, and if Rutherford’s tone – occasionally a touch nasal but essentially benign in its ruddy, plump-cheeked healthiness – can’t communicate the tortured grandeur of the young Bryn Terfel, his interpretation grows in emotional urgency as it progresses” Gramophone Magazine, June 2016

“His baritone has almost everything for the Schubert selection on this disc: lightness at the top, warmth in the middle, velvety low notes, and an edge that ensures the words cut through. In dramatic songs he’s capable of quicksilver changes of timbre.” The Guardian, 12th May 2016 ****

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Schubert: Schwanengesang

Schubert: Schwanengesang


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Harfenspieler I D325 (Goethe)

Harfenspieler III 'Wer nie sein Brot mit Tränen ass', D480

Harfenspieler II 'An die Türen will ich schleichen, D479

Grenzen der Menschheit, D716

Prometheus, D674 (Goethe)


Florian Boesch (baritone) & Malcolm Martineau (piano)

To complete their survey of the Schubert Song Cycles, Boesch & Martineau arrive at Schwanengesang, the set of 13 songs composed in 1828. These are masterly settings of Rellstab and Heine, and finds Schubert at the very peak of his lieder-composing prowess. An additional song 'Die Taubenpost' D956a to words by Seidl was included by the publisher but this recording excludes the song. It does however include five Goethe settings dating from 1815 - 1821. Florian Boesch is in glorious voice, often almost introverted and intimate, but gloriously even throughout his range.

“The young Austrian baritone...is one of the current It boys of German Lieder...Boesch may not have the most alluring of contemporary baritone sounds, but his savour of the text and thoughtful, undemonstrative style bring their own rewards. Martineau’s playing could hardly be bettered.” Sunday Times, 16th November 2014

“Boesch perfectly captures the resigned strength of the late masterpieces.” Classical Music ****

“[Boesch] has a very wide dynamic range at his disposal which he controls expertly while his palette of vocal colouring is wide ranging and applied with perception. Clearly he has established a formidable partnership with Malcolm Martineau...Here is an extremely accomplished and perceptive Schubertian.” MusicWeb International, 12th January 2015

“Boesch is a wonderful Schubert singer...the range of his full, rounded bass-baritone voice, always in tune, is remarkable.” International Record Review, March 2015

Onyx Boesch & Martineau Schubert Song Cycles - ONYX4131

(CD)

$14.25

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Schubert: Schwanengesang and other songs

Schubert: Schwanengesang and other songs

Decca Most Wanted Recitals Vol. 34


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Walter Klien (piano)

Heidenröslein, D257

Karl Engel (piano)

An die Entfernte, D765 (Goethe)

Karl Engel (piano)

Rastlose Liebe, D138

Karl Engel (piano)

Erster Verlust, D226 (Goethe)

Karl Engel (piano)

An Schwager Kronos, D369

Karl Engel (piano)

Schäfers Klagelied, D121 (Goethe)

Karl Engel (piano)

Willkommen und Abschied, D767

Karl Engel (piano)

Strauss, R:

Ich trage meine Minne, Op. 32 No. 1

Karl Engel (piano)

Befreit, Op. 39 No. 4

Karl Engel (piano)

Bruder Liederlich, Op. 41 No. 4

Karl Engel (piano)


Hermann Prey (baritone)

Decca Most Wanted Recitals - 4808171

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Schubert: Schwanengesang

Schubert: Schwanengesang


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Auf dem Strom, D943, Op. post. 119

Previously unpublished

Radovan Vlatković (horn)


The eighteen songs included in this recording of Schwanengesang all belong to the last three years of Schubert’s life. The earliest of them, Am Fenster, was written in March 1826, while the last, Die Taubenpost, was finished only a few weeks before his death on 19 November 1828. Fourteen of them, seven by Ludwig Rellstab, six by Heinrich Heine and one by the Vienna government official and journalist J.G. Seidl, were published by Tobias Haslinger in May 1829 under the umbrella title Schwanengesang (‘Swan Song’) and are often performed as a complete cycle. Of these, Am Fenster, Der Wanderer an den Mond (both Seidl) and Herbst (Rellstab), were not included in the original publication of Schwanengesang.

Auf dem Strom, with obbligato horn, dates from the previous year, 1827, but was first performed on 26 March 1828, marking the first anniversary of Beethoven’s death. The horn plays a significant melodic role in the setting, opening the piece, providing interludes between the verses, and duetting with the solo tenor voice. It was recorded in 1991 by Peter Schreier and András Schiff, with Radovan Vlatković, at the Decca Winterreise sessions, but owing to the playing time of the CD, Auf dem Strom did not appear. This is the recording’s first release.

“One of the greats. The most of all Schreier's Schwanengesang recordings, and with a previously unpublished performance of 'Auf der Strom' as a bonus.” BBC Music Magazine, March 2013 *****

“This is a wonderful disc by any standard. Indeed, the partnership of Schreier and Schiff [is] a masterstroke of Decca … [Schreier’s] performances of the Heine settings … have become so anguished as to expose every nerve end in their depiction of lost love, and Schiff's realization of the piano's role seconds the singer's probings perfectly. […] This is really a 'must' for any Lieder collection.” Gramophone Magazine, February 2013

“One of the most compelling recordings ever of Schwanengesang … The recording is vividly real.” Penguin Guide ***

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4804923

(CD)

$8.50

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Schubert Lieder Volume 6: Schwanengesang & Sonata D960

Schubert Lieder Volume 6: Schwanengesang & Sonata D960


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

with Matthias Goerne (baritone)

Piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat major, D960


Matthias Goerne continues his Schubert survey that has already established him as one of the most gifted exponents of the song repertoire. Goerne does not merely ‘interpret' Schubert, he 'lives' each song and invites the listener to share this poetry and musical intimacy.

This sixth volume also features an unforgettable performance of Schubert's last piano sonata by one of the baritone's favourite partners, Christoph Eschenbach. Offered on a free bonus CD, this ‘second swansong' reveals hitherto unexplored resonances under his expert fingers.

“Some of those songs – Der Atlas, Der Doppelgänger – become exercises in gothic horror, others are slowed down to the point of inertia, though the group of Rellstab settings is generally buoyant and beautifully nuanced.” The Guardian, 5th April 2012 ***

“This new Schwanengesang is characteristically thoughtful and probing: we hear Schubert’s lyrical heartbeat at its most artless and unaffected, outstandingly so in the ghostly stillnesses of “Die Stadt” and “Der Doppelgänger”… The second CD is devoted to one of Schubert’s last piano sonatas, to which Eschenbach brings classical grace and refinement, never seeking to milk the Romantic doom and gloom.” Financial Times, 21st April 2012

“Their phrasing is exquisite throughout, with 'Die Taubenpost' sounding particularly pliant...Yet some of the Heine settings lack requisite weirdness...But for the sheer beauty and suppleness of voice, Goerne remains unbeatable.” Entartetemusik, May 2012

“The distinctive mellow roundness of Goerne's timbre, at once deep and soft-grained, and his care for a true, 'bound' legato are pleasures in themselves. He and the ever-fastidious Eschenbach invariably allow you to savour the sheer beauty of Schubert's melodic lines.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2012

“Goerne is showing an increasing tendency to capitalise on what he does best, exploiting his superb breath control in singing of hushed and seamless legato...[He] has both the breath control and the will to give full time and space to the long, long last lines of 'In die Ferne', and to bring to them a sense of dark despair as well as longing. He is also able and willing to dare extremes of pacing and dynamics in a spectral 'Ihr Bild'.” BBC Music Magazine *****

“sung with unfailing beauty and sensitivity, at speeds that are on the slow side and in a manner that’s more than usually veiled with reserve and regret. The air of contemplation also pervades Eschenbach’s tonally gorgeous performance of the late, great Sonata in B flat” Irish Times, 13th July 2012

“Goerne has his own ideas about the music and puts them forth with confidence and persuasion. That, in the end, is what sells this recording…A fine disc.” Audiophile Audition, 5th September 2012

BBC Music Magazine

Choral & Song Choice - July 2012

Harmonia Mundi Matthias Goerne Schubert Edition - HMC902139/40

(CD - 2 discs)

$13.00

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Schubert - Schwanengesang

Schubert - Schwanengesang


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Herbst, D945

Der Winterabend (Es ist so still), D938


Robert Holl (bass-baritone) & Roger Vignoles (piano)

The Dutch bass-baritone Robert Holl is one of the great Lieder singers of our time. A recent review of a recital from The Times illustrates his extroardinary technique and mesmerising power: ’Dutch baritone Robert Holl delivered a Schubert programme with such natural force and passion that resistance was impossible … Holl’s huge presence, and huge, dark voice can transform itself at will into the lightest breath of spring, rising into a hushed head-voice with total ease, or fining itself down to recreate the vision of a wakeful gondolier and a sleeping Serenissima.’

In Holl’s first recording for Hyperion, he brings his tremendous artistry to Schubert’s last song-cycle.

The songs in Schwanengesang were described by Schubert’s publisher Haslinger as ‘the final blooms of Schubert’s creative muse’. Schwanengesang contains some of Schubert’s greatest works. It tells no particular story, but the two sets of songs are linked by their poetic themes—nature, love and separation in the case of the settings of Rellstab, bitterness, loss and despair in the case of Heine.

This recording includes two further songs. The first, Herbst, though also to a text by by Rellstab, did not appear in Schwanengesang, and the manuscript was not discovered until the 1890s. A highly atmospheric nature-piece, its texture anticipates Mendelssohn’s songs on a similar theme, with its tremolando right hand and sinuous, fateful left-hand melody. The other extra is Der Winterabend from 1828. The poem by Leitner creates the image of a contented man, contemplating not just the winter evening, but by implication also his approaching death (the silvery moonlight is a symbolic pall cast over the objects of his life). In his extensive booklet notes, Roger Vignoles writes that ‘If one wants to know how Schubert felt about his own mortality, it is worth noting the loving care he bestowed on this song. Every turn of phrase, every modulation is perfectly judged, as in the hushed sidestep (through a major third, his favourite interval) that announces the entry of the moonlight into the poet’s chamber’.

“…Holl's interpretation really does stand alone in its musical truthfulness and depth of insight.” BBC Music Magazine, October 2008 ****

“Part of what makes Holl such a wonderful artist is the obvious relish he has for the simple act of singing. The words emerge with a wonderful fruity weight, the tone burgeoning through the note's length.Being so firmly rooted in the body, the singing carries an immense natural conviction.” The Telegraph, 26th October 2006 (on the Wigmore Hall performance of Schwanengesang))

Hyperion - CDA67657

(CD)

$14.25

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Schubert: Schwanengesang, D957

Schubert: Schwanengesang, D957


Tom Krause (baritone), Irwin Gage (piano)

This classic Decca recording of Schubert's last song cycle, sumptuously recorded and incomparably sung, returns to the catalogue on Australian Eloquence.

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4672392

(CD)

$8.50

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Schubert: Schwanengesang

Schubert: Schwanengesang


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Stephan Genz (baritone)

Klavierstück in E flat major, D946 No. 2


Stephan Genz and the pianist Michel Dalberto have gathered at the piano to perform Schubert's Heine settings, known as his 'Swansong'. This cycle, with its moving accents and mysterious atmosphere, was made up by an editor in want of a commercial success, posthumously, yet this collection of lieder shows just how skilled Schubert was. Stephan Genz received his musical training as a member of the Thomanerchor Leipzig, as well as under Hans Joachim Beyer at the University of Music & Theatre Leipzig. He studied lieder with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf. He made his recital debut at the Wigmore Hall in London in 1997.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Aparté - AP151

(CD)

$14.25

(also available to download from $10.00)

Scheduled for release on 14 July 2017. Order it now and we will deliver it as soon as it is available. (Available now to download.)

Songs Of Yearning: Sehnsuchtslieder

Songs Of Yearning: Sehnsuchtslieder


Beethoven:

An die ferne Geliebte (To the distant beloved), Op. 98

Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957


Giorgos Kanaris (baritone), Thomas Wise (piano)

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) wrote his opus 98 in 1816; musicologists commonly describe An die ferne Geliebte (To the Distant Beloved) as the first ever song cycle. Franz Schubert (1797–1828) wrote his Schwanengesang (Swan Song) in 1828, the year of his death; the songs were posthumously made into a collection.

In terms of its musicological and sociological development, the Lied, having long been considered “inferior”, underwent a kind of emancipation process throughout the early modern period up until the start of the 19th century, when the emergence of the educated middleclass, particularly in the German-speaking world, allowed the new genre to take root. Such songs were performed at small venues too: in salons, small halls and before audiences that were not necessarily aristocratic or courtly. Dynamically versatile and affordable, the piano was now a common keyboard instrument and was often used to accompany the vocalist with supportive harmonies and melodic counterpoint.

Internationally renowned lieder singer Greek baritone Giorgos Kanaris is accompanied in these two song cycles of art-songs by American pianist Thomas Wise, who is also a wellrespected pedagogue, vocal coach and conductor.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Hänssler - HC16080

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$14.25

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Schubert: Schwanengesang & Shostakovich: Viola Sonata

Schubert: Schwanengesang & Shostakovich: Viola Sonata


Schubert:

Schwanengesang, D957

Die Taubenpost, D965A (D957 No. 14)

Shostakovich:

Viola Sonata, Op. 147


Pauline Sachse (viola) & Lauma Skride (piano)

„According to a Greek myth, the voices of swans have an otherworldly beauty, and their song is a foreboding of death. Such ethereal beauty emerges in moments which are to be treasured and preserved with care. The two works on this release stem from two outstanding composers who, at the end of their lives and in thoroughly different contexts, produced creations of lasting value. Schubert’s life came to an end at age 31, barely eighteen months after the death of Beethoven, whom he secretly revered as a model. He learned of Beethoven’s death when he had just finished composing Winterreise, a cycle of “chilling songs”, as he described them. Schubert’s friends later partially blamed the grim content of Winterreise for his early demise........

Shostakovich wrote his Sonata for viola and piano within an extremely brief period of time.

On 25 June 1975, Fyodor Druzhinin – the violist of the Beethoven Quartet, who were the composer’s friends – received a telephone call from the Shostakovich, informing him that he was working on a viola sonata and wanted to clear up initial technical matters with him. Shostakovich’s health had always been quite poor; by this time, after having suffered two heart attacks and a muscle disease, he was additionally weakened by years of fighting lung cancer.

Shostakovich finished his score on 5 July and passed away on 9 August. Fyodor Druzhinin and Mikhail Muntyan premiered the work only a few weeks later, on 25 September. The composer therefore never had the opportunity to hear what his work sounded like.

Shostakovich’s political outlook and his ambiguous attitude vis-à-vis the political system of the USSR have been much discussed; his music, however, remains clear and honest. He exposed the grotesque masks and masquerades of human society. In his compositions he chronicled his day and age, a period characterized by hypocrisy, fear, treason, unimaginable human vileness and an excessive cultivation of image on the part of those in power. His music is thus now as urgently appropriate as it ever was.” (From the Booklet-Notes by Pauline Sachse)

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Avi Music - AVI8553371

(CD)

$15.00

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Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

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