Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90 - download (MP3 & FLAC)

This page lists all recordings of Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, by Johannes Brahms (1833-97) on download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first.

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October 2008
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Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Complete)

Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Complete)


Even while creating a sensation across the US, with concerts in Chicago, Cleveland, New York and further afield, Rafael Kubelík recorded the four symphonies of Brahms with the Vienna Philharmonic for Decca (in stereo) in the 1950s. Long unavailable, they are here presented together for the first time on CD, in an economical 2CD package, further enhanced by both new digital remasterings from the original tapes, and an extensive appreciation of the happy marriage of composer and conductor by Rob Cowan.

Cowan observes that Kubelík came to take a more expansive view of this music in the recorded cycle he made almost 30 years later with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. In Vienna, exposition repeats were cut, tempi were taut and often uncommonly swift for the time, even in the pastoral Second and ruminative Third symphonies; impulsiveness and sudden access to drama were paramount, yet always modulated by the renowned, sweetly refined string sound. ‘Music has always developed by moving on to something new once one idiom has been exhausted,’ the conductor once remarked, ‘but it has always had a form. Like a tree, like a man, it must have a skeleton, flesh and veins – it must have its own logic.’

Such sensitivity to nature and to his fellow man stood Kubelík in good stead when approaching the work of a composer who felt likewise, and yet whose creativity was indeed ruthlessly disciplined by musical logic, whether in the long-gestated, darkness-to-light journey of the First or the ineluctable tragedy of the Fourth. These qualities, too, Kubelík had absorbed from his father, the violinist Jan Kubelík, whom he always regarded with more than filial respect. There is, indeed, an evolving tradition at work in these performances which commands attention anew.

“Kubelík’s performance has a splendid impulse to it; and the Vienna Philharmonic is at its best … this is an exciting version.” Gramophone Magazine, February 1959 (Symphony No.2)

“The performance illuminated by the fine general quality of sound is a strong one … The symphony is kept moving throughout, culminating in a finale which is positively exhilarating.” Gramophone Magazine, June 1958 (Symphony No.1)

“Kubelík gives a smooth and loving reading of the work, reserving excitement, as such, for the finale. The excitement, in fact, is doubly effective when held in reserve.” Gramophone Magazine, October 1956 (Symphony No.4)

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4824969

(CD - 2 discs)

$12.25

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Brahms: Violin Concerto & Symphony No. 3

Brahms: Violin Concerto & Symphony No. 3


Brahms:

Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90


Emilio Percan (violin & direction)

National Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Bashkortosta

With his Violin Concerto Brahms was often accused of having embedded the solo violin too deeply within the orchestra. When looking at his two piano concertos, his intention seems to have been rather to write symphonic concerts as virtuoso solo pieces with orchestral accompaniment. “Because of the dialogues in the orchestra between violins and wind instruments and the accompanying figures of the solo violins, the concert seems to me rather like a piece of chamber music”, tells us Emilio Percan and decided to record the Violin Concerto without a conductor. The matter of instrumentation is crucial in this context. Example for Percan is the Meininger Hofkapelle, which premiered many of Brahms’ pieces and played with almost half of the violins than other orchestras of the time (and of today!). Brahms, however, had an exact idea of how the orchestral arrangement should look like for his pieces. For the performance of one of his symphonies in Boston, he was to sketch the desired setup and made a drawing which was the model for the present recording. The result is a completely new listening experience which brings both the Violin Concerto and the Third Symphony closer to chamber music, thereby allowing hitherto unknown aspects of the music to arise.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Pan Classics - PC10356

(CD)

$14.50

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Elbphilharmonie Hamburg: The First Recording (Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4)

Elbphilharmonie Hamburg: The First Recording (Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4)


Brahms:

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98


With his imagination, his musicological passion for discovery and his uncompromising manner of music-making, Thomas Hengelbrock numbers among the most sought-after conductors of our time and he is musical director of the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra. Concert tours with the orchestra have taken him through Germany, Europe, and Asia. The opening of the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg in January 2017 will mark the beginning of a new era for the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, formerly the NDR Symphony Orchestra: the ensemble will move in as orchestra in residence at the Elbphilharmonie, making its musical home after a 70-year history. The orchestra’s programme will play a major role in shaping the artistic profile of this spectacular new concert hall. The NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra was founded in 1945, holds its own concert series in Hamburg, Lübeck and Kiel today and plays a leading role at the large festivals in northern Germany. Its international standing is underlined by tours throughout Europe, to North and South America and to Asia.

“[Hengelbrock] sacrifices a degree of tension in Brahms's dynamic cut-and-thrust for long, simmering vocal lines: we certainly learn the hall allows for great spaciousness and subtle bloom. In the Third Symphony the Andante has a wonderful still serenity, winds and horn glow and strings drape the melody with silken texture” BBC Music Magazine, May 2017 ***

Sony - 88985405082

(CD)

$13.25

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Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4

Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4


Brahms:

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98


Brandenburgisches Staatsorchester Frankfurt, Howard Griffiths

Not only did Brahms write his symphonies, he also heard them - and was impressed with conductor Fritz Steinbach. Several decades ago one of his students published Steinbach's interpretive notes, which sparked the profound interest of Howard Griffiths, the director of the Brandenburgisches Staatsorchester Frankfurt / Oder - there hardly is a more authentic way of listening to Brahms' symphonies.

This rendition of the two symphonies is based on a collection of detailed and exciting interpretive suggestions, which Brahms himself knew, heard and liked. They were conceived by Fritz Steinbach, a conductor and contemporary of Brahms, who the composer considered the best performer of his symphonies. Howard Griffiths has thoroughly studied the dossier and has diligently transferred the notes to his score: he plays with the tempo, balances with the dynamics and uses minute shifts of accentuation to great effect. This brings the interpretation very close to Brahms intention, thereby literally presenting the listener with a historically informed performance and simply providing the most authentic way of enjoying Brahms' last two symphonies. A recording of the first two symphonies performed by the Brandenburgisches Staatsorchester Frankfurt under the baton of Howard Griffiths has already been released by Klanglogo in 2015 (KL1513).

“The spirit of romance is certainly present in Griffiths’s readings…[and] the Frankfurt orchestra produces a very agreeable soft-grained legato sound” Gramophone Magazine, August 2016

Klanglogo - KL1514

(CD)

$12.25

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Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4

Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4


Brahms:

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98


RCA Classical Masters - 88697711362

(CD)

$6.50

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Brahms: Symphony No. 3

Brahms: Symphony No. 3


Brahms:

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Nänie von Friedrich Schiller, für Chor und Orchester, Op. 82

Ich schwing mein Horn ins Jammertal, Op. 41 No. 1

Es tönt ein voller Harfenklang, Op. 17 No. 1

Nachtwache I 'Leise Töne der Brust', Op. 104 No. 1

Einförmig ist der Liebe Gram, Op. 113 No. 13

Gesang der Parzen (Song of the Fates), Op. 89


Recording locations: Recorded live at the Salle Pleyel, Paris and Royal Festival Hall, London.

Soli Deo Gloria is proud to release the third instalment in the successful Brahms Symphony series which sees John Eliot Gardiner and his Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique explore the music of Johannes Brahms.

The choral pieces on this release demonstrate beautifully the extent to which choral thinking permeates Brahms’ orchestral writing. Gardiner states that ‘just as there is choral thinking evident in his symphonies, surely there are also signs of orchestral thinking embedded within his choral writing.’ Both Nänie and Gesang der Parzen show fascinating links with Brahms’ last two symphonies Parzen sharing with the Third not just an adjacent opus number but an immensely powerful orchestral opening, with passing references to ‘early music’ styles next to passages of the most advanced harmony.

Einförmig ist der Liebe Gram, an irresistible little piece written for women’s voices, sees Brahms take the final song from Schubert’s Winterreise and turn it into a haunting six-part canon. Another example of Brahms forging links with a revered predecessor.

Written nearly six years after Brahms completed his Second Symphony, his third symphony was described by Hans Richter on its premiere as Brahms’ ‘Erioica’. A friend of Brahms and music critic at the time, Eduard Hanslick, wrote: “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect”

“…urgent, magnificently angry… This is Gardiner at his penetrating, combative best, making contact with the music's heartbeat in a way that sounds both radical and natural…” BBC Music Magazine, November 2009 *****

“Taking up more than half the disc, the choral items are its obvious glory… Gardiner sets his face against anything that could be construed as false consolation. In his element in Song of the Fates, he gives the sublime Nänie an unusually taut, sharp-edged feel.” Gramophone Magazine, November 2009

“This period instrument interpretation for Brahms 3 will be a surprise to many. Once you’ve adjusted though, the enjoyment to be gained from this superbly performed disc (…) is enormous” CD Review

“It’s hard to under-emphasise the lift Gardiner’s historically informed performance has given to Brahms’s Third Symphony” Classic FM Magazine

“A must-have disc for Brahmsians” Sunday Times

“Throughout, there’s the satisfying phrasing that Gardiner excels in, with melodic lines and their accompaniments shifting and undulating to a satisfying degree...Riveting, enlightening and enjoyable in equal measure.” Charlotte Gardner, bbc.co.uk, 9th September 2009

“This recording with the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique under John Eliot Gardiner is one of the most urgent readings of this symphony I can recall, especially in the outer movements, and it certainly makes for a tremendously exciting performance, with some thrilling horn playing in particular.” James Longstaffe, Presto Classical, November 2014

SDG Brahms Symphonies - SDG704

(CD)

$13.25

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Brahms - Symphonies 3 & 4

Brahms - Symphonies 3 & 4


Brahms:

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53

Dunja Vejzovic (soprano)

Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98

Tragic Overture, Op. 81


Houston Symphony, Christopher Eschenbach

Erato de Virgin - 6932282

(CD - 2 discs)

$9.75

(also available to download from $8.00)

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Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Complete)

Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Complete)


DG 2CD - 4742632

(CD - 2 discs)

$13.00

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Brahms: Symphony No. 3

Brahms: Symphony No. 3


Brahms:

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90

Tragic Overture, Op. 81

Schicksalslied, Op. 54

Ernst-Senff-Chor


Building a Library

First Choice - October 2008

DG - 4297652

(CD)

$13.25

(also available to download from $8.25)

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Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Complete)

Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1-4 (Complete)


“The playing of the Berlin Philharmonic remains uniquely cultivated, the ensemble is finely polished, and yet there is no lack of warmth or impetus throughout the set.” Penguin Guide, 2011 edition

DG 2CD - 4530972

(CD - 2 discs)

$13.00

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