Dvorak: Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

This page lists all recordings of Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53, by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904) on CD, SACD, DVD, Blu-ray & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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Waldbühne 2016 from Berlin: Czech Night

Waldbühne 2016 from Berlin: Czech Night

Recorded live at the Waldbuehne Berlin, 2016, directed by Henning Kasten


Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Lisa Batiashvili (violin)

Symphony No. 6 in D major, Op. 60

Smetana:

Má Vlast: Vltava


What kind of music could be better suited for the Berliner Philharmoniker’s legendary annual Waldbühne concert than Czech music? It’s always passionate and full of verve and sure to lift everyone’s spirits. Only very rarely does a young talent ascend to ‘world stardom’, but one of the few who can be considered an international superstar while still belonging to the new generation of conductors is Yannick Nézet-Séguin. He presents the much-loved Vlatava (Moldau) as well as Dvořák’s Sixth Symphony and Violin Concerto with the wonderful Lisa Batiashvili on the violin.

“An evening in Berlin that could not have been more perfect.” (Tagesspiegel)

This concert is a dual premiere for Yannick Nézet-Séguin (Artist of the Year 2016 and winner of the ECHO Klassik 2014): for the first time, the Canadian is conducting the Berliner Philharmoniker at their last concert of the season at the Waldbühne. This is also his first appearance with the orchestra since his debut in 2010, with an interpretation of the two major Czech national composers, Bedřich Smetana and Antonín Dvořák.

With his orchestra cycle Má vlast, Smetana created a musical portrait of his home country; particularly the second part, The Moldau, came to stand as the embodiment of Czech music. Smetana combines rhythmic and melodic elements of Czech folklore with stylistic devices of Western symphonic music.

The same applies for Antonín Dvořák, fashioning his own musical language, shaped by the Bohemian idiom, in the Slavonic Dances. Thus his Sixth Symphony contains many allusions to Czech folk songs and dances that are typical of Dvořák’s music.

The Violin Concerto is also inspired by Slavic dance rhythms. This captivating piece is played by the Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili, acclaimed by the press as a “ballerina on the violin”.

Including ‘conductor camera’ option: switch to the ‘picture-in-picture’ or ‘full screen’ in the conductor’s camera feature (full concert length) and experience maestro Nézet-Séguin from the orchestra’s perspective.

16:9 – NTSC

PCM Stereo, DD 5.0, DTS 5.0

Language/subtitles: N/A

Region code: 0 (worldwide)

Running time: 107 mins

Production year: 2016

Released or re-released in last 6 months

DVD Video

Region: 0

Format: NTSC

EuroArts Waldbühne - 8024261498

(DVD Video)

$15.50

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Waldbühne 2016 from Berlin: Czech Night

Waldbühne 2016 from Berlin: Czech Night

Recorded live at the Waldbuehne Berlin, 2016, directed by Henning Kasten


Dvorak:

Symphony No. 6 in D major, Op. 60

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Lisa Batiashvili (violin)

Smetana:

Má Vlast: Vltava


What kind of music could be better suited for the Berliner Philharmoniker’s legendary annual Waldbühne concert than Czech music? It’s always passionate and full of verve and sure to lift everyone’s spirits. Only very rarely does a young talent ascend to ‘world stardom’, but one of the few who can be considered an international superstar while still belonging to the new generation of conductors is Yannick Nézet-Séguin. He presents the much-loved Vlatava (Moldau) as well as Dvořák’s Sixth Symphony and Violin Concerto with the wonderful Lisa Batiashvili on the violin.

“An evening in Berlin that could not have been more perfect.” (Tagesspiegel)

This concert is a dual premiere for Yannick Nézet-Séguin (Artist of the Year 2016 and winner of the ECHO Klassik 2014): for the first time, the Canadian is conducting the Berliner Philharmoniker at their last concert of the season at the Waldbühne. This is also his first appearance with the orchestra since his debut in 2010, with an interpretation of the two major Czech national composers, Bedřich Smetana and Antonín Dvořák.

With his orchestra cycle Má vlast, Smetana created a musical portrait of his home country; particularly the second part, The Moldau, came to stand as the embodiment of Czech music. Smetana combines rhythmic and melodic elements of Czech folklore with stylistic devices of Western symphonic music.

The same applies for Antonín Dvořák, fashioning his own musical language, shaped by the Bohemian idiom, in the Slavonic Dances. Thus his Sixth Symphony contains many allusions to Czech folk songs and dances that are typical of Dvořák’s music.

The Violin Concerto is also inspired by Slavic dance rhythms. This captivating piece is played by the Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili, acclaimed by the press as a “ballerina on the violin”.

Including ‘conductor camera’ option: switch to the ‘picture-in-picture’ or ‘full screen’ in the conductor’s camera feature (full concert length) and experience maestro Nézet-Séguin from the orchestra’s perspective.

1080/60i-Full HD-16:9

PCM Stereo, DTS-HD Master Audio 5.0

Language/subtitles: N/A

Region code: All (A1/B2/C3)

Running time: 107 mins

Production year: 2016

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Blu-ray Disc

Region: all

EuroArts Waldbühne - 8024261494

(Blu-ray)

$18.00

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Dvorak: Violin Concerto

Dvorak: Violin Concerto


Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Romance in F minor, Op. 11

Mazurek for violin and orchestra, Op. 49 (B89)

Romantic Pieces (4) for Violin & Piano, Op. 75

Lukás Klánsky (piano)


"Jan is a worthy winner. He has fascinated us from the first round. Not only with his technical skills, but also with his charisma on stage" the chairman of the jury of the 2014 Fritz Kreisler Competition announced after Mrácek’s performance with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra was met with thunderous applause. Prior to this Mrácek has studied with the great Czech master Václav Hudecek, as well as with Levon Chilingirian, Gavriel Lipkind and Ida Haendel.

For his debut CD, Jan Mrácek has chosen an all Czech programme devoted to Dvorák. The violin concerto sits on the margins of that exclusive club of 'great' concertos but this is to misunderstand the originality and genius of this concerto, dedicated to Joseph Joachim, written by a superb violinist with a deep understanding of the capabilities of his instrument.

The easy charm and lyricism of the music has always appealed to the public. The haunting 'Romance in F' originally formed the slow movement of an early String Quartet Op. 9, and has the ability to stick in the listener’s memory long after the music has stopped. 'Mazurek' Op.49 was dedicated to Pablo de Sarasate and is typical of Dvorak’s Slavonic style. The 'Four Romantic Pieces' Op. 75 were composed for a group of friends of varying musical abilities, and are charming, easy-going works.

“Mráček offers a lusty performance of the infrequently performed Mazurek, Op 49 – both violinist and conductor score maximum points here.” Gramophone Magazine, August 2016

“the highlights here are Marilyn Horne party pieces: Dolci d’amor parole from Tancredi and Ah, quel giorno ognor rammento from Semiramide, in which Fagioli is a plausible impersonator of the great US singer.” Sunday Times, 30th October 2016

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Onyx - ONYX4160

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Dvořák, Suk, Janáček: Violin Concertos

Dvořák, Suk, Janáček: Violin Concertos


Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Janacek:

Violin Concerto 'Pilgrimage of the Soul'

Suk:

Fantasy for Violin & Orchestra, Op. 24


Dvořák – Suk – Janáček. Three very different composers with three different stories, and yet there is a great closeness and spiritual kinship between them.

Dvořák’s op. 53 is now part of the repertoire of all the world’s great violinists, however even that greatest of virtuosi, Joseph Joachim – the man to whom Dvořák dedicated the work – helped search for and was closely involved in shaping the concerto's final form.

Suk’s Fantasy in G minor is, internally, a highly diverse work, a kind of virtuoso, rhapsodic symphonic poem for violin that stands on the threshold of a new and momentous creative period in the composer’s work.

And what of Janáček: he already had a name for his intended violin concerto, "The Wandering of a Little Soul", but in the end he used the material he had collected in his final opera "From the House of the Dead". The material from which the concerto was later reconstructed is typical Janáček: sharply defined, with great energy and urgency.

The 28-‐year old violinist Josef Špaček, a laureate of the keenly watched Queen Elisabeth Music Competition, recorded these concerts live with "his" Czech Philharmonic Orchestra under it's principal conductor Jiří Bělohlávek.

“This is a boldly imaginative gathering of Czech works for solo violin and orchestra…Josef Špaček, with Jiří Bělohlávek's wonderfully attentive orchestral accompaniment, produces a near-ideal interpretation [of the Suk]…many will warm to Špaček's soft-grained tone, especially in the slow movement [of the Dvorak].” BBC Music Magazine, September 2015

“the young Joseph Špaček reminded me more both of his great forebear Josef Suk and, at times of David Oistrakh. It's mostly to do with the firm cut of his bowing, the clarity of his articulation and the sureness of his rhythmic attack. His tone is sweetly expressive but he varies it according to the dictates of the passing musical phrase.” Gramophone Magazine, July 2015

“If anything Josef Špaček, the young concertmaster of the Czech Philharmonic, makes an even more powerful impression than his illustrious predecessor [Josef Suk]. His is a full-blooded performance with the Czech Philharmonic under its music director with him all the way…[this] young violinist has embarked on what is a very promising career.” MusicWeb International, June 2015

“the violinist’s individual, deeply considered and virtuosic account of Dvorak’s solo part is the highlight of this keenly conceived programme. He is extrovert in the dancing rhythms of the outer Allegros and spellbindingly inward in the serene Adagio. In this repertoire, Spacek is second to none today.” Sunday Times, 26th April 2015

“[The Janáček] is given a superb, heart-rending performance here by Josef Špaček backed by the deep understanding that Jiří Bělohlávek brings especially to the music of his native country. That is equally true of the Dvořák Concerto...Špaček is a compelling protagonist here, with a richness and piquancy of timbre that contributes to an interpretation not merely of virtuosity and flair but also of expressiveness.” The Telegraph, 26th April 2015 ****

Supraphon - SU41822

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Johanna Martzy

Johanna Martzy

Berlin, 1953-1966


 

Suite No. 1 in G Major (Allegro)

Fiocco/O’Neill

Bach, J S:

Sonata for solo violin No. 1 in G minor, BWV1001

Brahms:

Violin Sonata No. 1 in G major, Op. 78

Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

RIAS-Symphonie-Orchester, Ferenc Fricsay

Handel:

Sonata in A Major for violin and continuo, HWV361, Op. 1 No. 3

Kreisler:

Rondino on a Theme by Beethoven

Danse Espagnole (after Falla)

Ravel:

Berceuse sur le nom de Fauré

Vivaldi:

Violin Sonata in D Major, RV10


Johanna Martzy (violin) & Jean Antonietti (piano)

The Hungarian violinist Johanna Martzy was considered one of the great hopes of her generation during the 1950s. From her base in Switzerland, she conquered all the major European concert stages from 1950 onwards. Through a chain of unfortunate events, her career had already passed its apex during the early 1960s. At the end of the decade, her career that had begun so brilliantly finally came to a complete standstill. The doubts of this serious and introverted musician outweighed her longing and temptation to live a life in the limelight. Because Johanna Martzy’s recording career only lasted four years, her name has become a legend amongst experts; her recordings are rare collector’s items. Her highly conscious, careful selection of repertoire was completely consistent with her way of making music. The clear, brilliant tone, without any frills, of her preferred Carlo Bergonzi violin lends her playing a definite profile that is easy to recognise. She limited herself to a very manageable number of works ranging from Bach to moderate modern composers, but mastered these utterly. In 1953 she was engaged by the RIAS (today: Deutschlandradio Kultur) to participate in a production of the Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 of Antonín Dvorák on the occasion of a concert with Ferenc Fricsay and the RIAS Symphony Orchestra. Since the orchestra at that time stood under the shock of impending disbandment, a recording of this same work with Deutsche Grammophon was made in order to gain financial support. Although both recordings were made in the same recording room within just a few days of each other, they are markedly different, especially in their respective sounds. The radio recording, which was long thought to have been identical to the recording made for commercial release, is being issued here for the first time.

During the 1960s, when Johanna Martzy had begun to withdraw from the major concert stages for private reasons, she regularly came to Berlin to give recitals with her piano partner Jean Antonietti. On these occasions, she also visited the recording studios of the RIAS a number of times. All of the recordings made there that still exist today can be heard in this edition. Johanna Martzy’s mastery and beauty of tone on these recordings are utterly convincing, and show that she was still at the height of her powers at that time.

Her death in 1979, hardly noticed by the general public, thus signified a tragic loss for the musical world.

“Another invaluable collection of Martzy recordings, including a glorious account of the Dvorak Violin Concerto recorded for Berlin radio in 1953, two days before the same artists recorded it commercially.” BBC Music Magazine, March 2015 ****

“Beauty of tone is a distinctive hallmark of the Handel Sonata. It is a performance of refinement and nobility, with both players demonstrating a great affection for the music...Audite have done a wonderful job re-mastering these original analogue tapes from the RIAS archives, and sound quality throughout is top-notch.” MusicWeb International, 23rd June 2015

“a magnificent performance of great power and intensity, especially where it is most necessary, in the Adagio. I normally find non-Czech interpretations of this concerto easy to resist but Martzy and Fricsay pay such attention to the rhythms that the result is irresistible. Even if you have the DG version, you need this one.” The Strad, June 2015

Audite - AUDITE23424

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Dvorak: Complete Concertos

Dvorak: Complete Concertos


Dvorak:

Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 33

Rudolf Firkušný (piano)

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Ruggiero Ricci (violin)

Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104

Zara Nelsova (cello)

Romance in F minor, Op. 11

Mazurek for violin and orchestra, Op. 49 (B89)

Ruggiero Ricci (violin)

Waldesruhe (Silent woods) for cello and orchestra, Op. 68 No. 5

Zara Nelsova (cello)

Rondo in G minor for cello & orchestra, Op. 94, B. 181

Zara Nelsova (cello)


The three solo concertos and smaller concertante works by Dvorak, on two CDs!

In Dvořák’s substantial symphonic oeuvre there are only three concertos, but each is a masterwork of its kind, frequently played and audience favourites.

The Cello Concerto is the best and most popular in its genre, a dramatic and sweeping display of romantic passion, the Piano Concerto and Violin Concerto are strong and virtuoso works, with hints of the rich folklore of Dvořák’s home country Bohemia.

Reissue from the rich Vox catalogue, featuring excellent soloists of international fame: cellist Sara Nelsova, pianist Rudolf Firkusny and violinist Ruggiero Ricci.

“The Violin and Cello Concertos, superbly played, have long been audience favourites, but the rarely-heard Piano Concerto in G minor - eloquently played by its foremost champion - is the USP.” BBC Music Magazine, Christmas 2014 ****

20% off Brilliant Classics

Brilliant Classics - 94938BR

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Bruch & Dvorak: Violin Concertos

Bruch & Dvorak: Violin Concertos


Bruch:

Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26

Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53


Joined by the Zürich Tonhalle Orchestra and David Zinman, Fischer pairs the ever-popular Bruch concerto with Dvorák's undeservedly neglected but perennially fresh masterpiece - a rather more logical twinning than the ubiquitous Mendelssohn.

A former Artist of the Year at the 2007 Gramophone Awards, and 'Instrumentalist of the Year' at the 2009 MIDEM Classical Awards, Fischer signed to Decca Classics shortly afterwards and this is her fifth release for the label.

Reviewing Julia Fischer’s performance of the Dvorák Concerto in London, The Guardian wrote, “Dvorák’s Violin Concerto, a romantic showpiece too often passed over in favour of Bruch and Mendelssohn, has a piquant slow movement to compete with either. Fischer made sure we heard every note, handing us each bar with absolute technical assurance and in a lustrous, seamless tone.”

“Zinman takes full advantage of Dvorák’s command and exploitation of orchestral texture and instrumental colour...Ubiquitous the [Bruch] concerto might be, but here Fischer asserts all the freshness and intensity that are hallmarks of her stylish playing...The finale’s rhythmic drive and rapture cap a performance, and a disc, of striking presence and allure.” The Telegraph, 15th March 2013 ****

“a spirited, buoyant performance [of the Dvorak] that for much of the work's duration wears an irresistable smile.” Gramophone Magazine, June 2013

“a very attractive coupling. The much-recorded Bruch receives a passionate and strongly compelling performance, with Julia Fischer delivering a dazzlingly brilliant and technically flawless account of the solo part.” BBC Music Magazine, August 2013 ****

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - June 2013

Decca - 4783544

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Dvorak: Violin Concerto & Romance

Dvorak: Violin Concerto & Romance


Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Romance in F minor, Op. 11

Suk:

Fantasy for Violin & Orchestra, Op. 24

A Fairy Tale, Op. 16


A living legend, Josef Suk is rightly considered the most distinguished representative of the 20th-century Czech violin school. His peerless, rich and beautiful tone has been captured on countless other albums. In the year in which Suk celebrated his eightieth birthday Supraphon released his splendid new recording, featuring some of the chamber works of the artist’s grandfather and great-grandfather, respectively – Josef Suk and Antonín Dvořák (SU 3976-2). Suk has taken great care to preserve the artistic legacy of his two celebrated ancestors throughout his life.

In a sensitively remastered form, this CD brings the legendary recordings of Dvořák’s Concerto in A minor and Suk’s Fantasy from the golden era of the soloist and Neumann’s Czech Philharmonic Orchestra alike. Not even Joseph Joachim, the most famous violinist among Dvořák’s contemporaries, ventured to perform the concerto. Yet the recording that originated almost one hundred years later demonstrates that the work ultimately found the most competent hands and heart it could possibly find. True legends – Josef Suk performing Dvořák’s Violin Concerto and Suk’s Fantasy.

“Think of a Czech counterpart to Russia's David Oistrakh: there's the same huge fullness and weight of sound, with technical immensity to match, plus a darkly beautiful tone-quality that goes straight to the music's lyrical heart. Add to this the Czech Philharmonic in its finest vintage ever, with a magnificent conductor at the helm, and you have some unforgettable music-making.” Classic FM Magazine, August 2011 *****

“the passionate projection and razor-like "edge" of Suk's playing bring out all the temperament and local colour that his grandfather (the composer Josef Suk) and great-grandfather (Dvorak) were famous for.” Gramophone Magazine, August 2011

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Ruggiero Ricci - Romantic Violin Concertos

Ruggiero Ricci - Romantic Violin Concertos


Beethoven:

Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61

London Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Adrian Boult

Bruch:

Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26

London Symphony Orchestra, Piero Gamba

Dvorak:

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

London Symphony Orchestra, Sir Malcolm Sargent

Mendelssohn:

Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64

Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, Jean Fournet


A double-CD of Romantic Violin Concertos celebrating the art of Ruggiero Ricci, this set includes the first international release on CD of the Ricci/Boult 1952 recording of the Beethoven. Boult characterised it as ‘perhaps the most thoughtful concerto, the one which needs for the violinist to be a great man as well as a great player’. Indeed it is a thoughtful and poised reading from both soloist and conductor, coupled with classic accounts of the Mendelssohn, Bruch and Dvorak. The booklet notes by Tully Potter include a biography of Ricci and (sometimes wry!) comments by the violinist himself on the recordings.

[Beethoven] “I do not think we are likely to get a better recording for a long while” Gramophone

[Bruch] "Ricci gives very good performances indeed of both concertos; caught out nowhere, even on the margin of intonation, by their technical demands in the outer movements, he manages also to communicate both poetry and impulse to the slow movements." Gramophone

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Dvorák & Szymanowski - Violin Concertos

Dvorák & Szymanowski - Violin Concertos


Dvorak:

Romance in F minor, Op. 11

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53

Szymanowski:

Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 35


Arabella Steinbacher (violin)

Radio Symphony Orchestra Berlin, Marek Janowski

This is Steinbecher’s debut on Pentatone. She is 27 and was taught by the same teacher as Julia Fischer. Her previous recordings for Orfeo have all got great reviews.

“Technically, she's supremely accomplished and refined…” The Guardian, 13th November 2009 ***

“From this recording one would imagine that hers is not a big tone but it is an opulent one, cushioned by ample if well controlled vibrato. That opulence makes her playing of the heartfelt melody in the slow movement of Dvorák's Violin Concerto winningly rich. She is equally successful in bringing out the marked Slavonic flavours in the outer movements... treating the dance rhythms of the finale with sparkling lightness. ...Szymanowski's First Violin Concerto... is a difficult work for soloist and conductor to hold together with its sharp contrasts of mood and tempo, but the alliance of Steinbacher and Janowski achieves that with total conviction. ...a performance that carries total conviction.” Gramophone Magazine, January 2010

“…in a haunting performance of Szymanowski's Violin Concerto No. 1 the solo part seems to float in over a lush orchestra. Steinbacher's tone is sweet, her playing poised - in satisfying contrast to the muscular contribution of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra under Marek Janowski. ...Dvorák's Romance in F minor, which calls for (and receives) flowing, song-like lines. ...same composer's Violin Concerto...was written in the wake of the Slavonic Dances, something that show especially in the dance-infused finale... This is a performance in which the soloist sounds as if she is leading the dance, and everyone is rhythmically buoyant in the heady climax of an enjoyable and vividly recorded disc.” BBC Music Magazine, January 2010 ****

“Steinbacher makes a powerful case for Szymanowski's First Concerto as a minor masterpiece” Classic FM Magazine, August 2011 ****

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - January 2010

Building a Library

Recommended - May 2013

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