Chopin: Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

This page lists all recordings of Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3, by Frédéric François Chopin (1810-49) on CD, SACD & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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Play: Works for cello and piano

Play: Works for cello and piano


Bloch, E:

From Jewish Life: No. 1, Prayer

Chopin:

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Dvorak:

Waldesruhe (Silent woods) for cello and orchestra, Op. 68 No. 5

Elgar:

Salut d'amour, Op. 12

Fauré:

Élégie in C minor, Op. 24

Françaix:

Mouvement perpétuel

Glazunov:

Chant du Ménestrel, Op. 71

Gluck:

Orfeo ed Euridice (Orphée et Euridice): Dance of the Blessed Spirits

Massenet:

Dix Pièces de genre, Op. 10: No. 5. Melodie

Monti, V:

Csárdás

Paganini:

Variations on a theme by Rossini for cello & piano

Popper:

Dance of the Elves, Op. 39

Poulenc:

Les chemins de l'amour

Rostropovich:

Humoresque, Op. 5

Saint-Saëns:

Mon cœur s'ouvre à ta voix (from Samson et Dalila)

Schubert:

Ave Maria, D839

Tchaikovsky:

Valse sentimentale, Op. 51 No. 6


Edgar Moreau (cello) & Pierre-Yves Hodique (piano)

The French cellist Edgar Moreau, who reaches the age of 20 in 2014, can already look back on a number of exceptional achievements, among them becoming the winner – at the age of just 17 – of the Second Prize in Russia’s formidable Tchaikovsky Competition, winning the Young Soloist Prize in the 2009 Rostropovich Cello Competition in Paris, and performing with such distinguished musicians as Valery Gergiev, Gidon Kremer, András Schiff, Yuri Bashmet, Krzysztof Penderecki, Gustavo Dudamel, Renaud Capuçon, Nicholas Angelich, Frank Braley, Khatia Buniatishvili, Gérard Caussé and the Talich Quartet. In 2013 his huge potential was highlighted by France’s top music awards, Les Victoires de la Musique, which named him the year’s ‘Révélation’ among young classical instrumentalists.

He has also made his first recording for ERATO with pianist Pierre-Yves Hodique, due for release in March 2014. It is a collection of short pieces – both virtuosic and lyrical. Rostropovich’s composition Humoresque features alongside works by, among others: Paganini, Chopin, Saint-Saëns, Fauré, Dvořák, Massenet, Schubert, Poulenc and Tchaikovsky. Although the album focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries, Moreau has a lively interest in contemporary music and looks forward to the opportunity to premiere new works as his career progresses.

A Parisian by birth, Edgar Moreau first realised he wanted to play the cello when he was just four years old – the instrument caught his imagination when he saw a girl having a cello lesson in an antique shop he was visiting with his father. He began lessons soon afterwards, and was giving concerts with major orchestras by the time he was 11 years old. Since the age of 13 he has been a student at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris. He has participated in masterclasses given by such cellists as Lynn Harrell, Anner Bylsma, Miklós Perényi, Gary Hoffman and David Geringas, and since October 2013 has been attending the Kronberg Academy near Frankfurt – home to the Emanuel Feuermann Conservatory, named after the legendary Ukrainian-born cellist.

Over the 2013-14 season he appears with, among others, the Orchestre National de France in Paris, the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester in Berlin, and the Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse (under Tugan Sokhiev), while his recitals include dates at the Auditorium du Louvre and Berlin Philharmonie, and he plays chamber music – with Renaud Capuçon among his partners – at the Easter festival in Aix-en-Provence and in Wurzburg and Saint-Denis. He also joins Capuçon and Khatia Buniatishvili for Beethoven’s Triple Concerto in Lugano.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Erato - 2564636958

(CD)

$17.25

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Chopin & Saint-Saëns: Cello Sonatas

Chopin & Saint-Saëns: Cello Sonatas


Chopin:

Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 65

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Saint-Saëns:

Cello Sonata No. 2 in F major Op. 123


Jamie Walton (cello) & Daniel Grimwood (piano)

Two works from very different composers: Chopin’s works for cello were few and far between, but these two straddle his compositional life: the Introduction and Polonaise was written in 1829 when he was just 19, and the Cello Sonata of 1845-6 is his last work published during his lifetime: all latter works with opus numbers being published posthumously, against his wishes. By contrast, Saint-Saëns published a great many works for the cello, as well as works in almost every genre of the classical canon, with the Cello Sonata No.2 composed during his travels in Biskra, Algeria.

Jamie Walton and Daniel Grimwood are performers who have proven themselves, in both concert and recordings, to be formidable and enthralling interpreters of the classical canon. This release follows their previous duo disc of Rachmaninov and Grieg cello sonatas on Signum.

“intensely passionate performances of two of the most overtly romantic cello sonatas. The Saint-Saens Second is here full of heroic power, its long lyric passages sweeping forward in a golden glow of cello tone. Grimwood’s piano makes a powerful partner that continues in a rhythmically pliable and vigorous reading of Chopin’s neglected score. Excellent recording that perfectly captures the beauty of Walton’s playing.” Yorkshire Evening Post, 27th May 2011

“Jamie Walton’s mature cello timbre and perceptiveness in matters of interpretation are winningly applied to this coupling of two 19th-century sonatas. His musical partnership with Daniel Grimwood brings special immediacy and finesse to these performances...Finely honed stylistic judgment here goes hand in hand with re-creative panache.” The Telegraph, 9th June 2011 *****

“Walton's sound in this excellent recording is open and luminous. Daniel Grimwood is more than a match for his extravagant part [in the Saint-Saens]...There's plenty of Mendelssohnian magic here in both the lazily eloquent and fleet-footed variations, and an infectious sense of enjoyment...Their fine performance of Chopin's great Sonata clears its technical hurdles with ease.” BBC Music Magazine, September 2011 ****

“Jamie Walton is alive to the twists and turns of Saint-Saens's imagination and brings to the sonata a warm, rich sound that is initially very persuasive, ably supported by Daniel Grimwood, who surmounts the considerable challenges of the piano-writing with ease and musicality.” Gramophone Magazine, October 2011

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Signum - SIGCD252

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Trio Chausson play Chopin & Liszt

Trio Chausson play Chopin & Liszt


Chopin:

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Piano Trio in G minor Op. 8

Liszt:

Tristia, S723 (arranged from Vallée d'Obermann S160/6)


Trio Chausson

Frederic Chopin’s Polonaise Brillante, Op. 3, is one of the few pieces this composer ever wrote for an instrument besides piano. Written when he was only 19 years old, in the autumn of 1829, Chopin had fallen head over heels for a young woman in Warsaw. Unfortunately for Chopin, the love was unrequited. Chopin's father, in hopes of easing Chopin's heartbreak took his son on a week-long trip to visit the estate of Prince Radziwill, who had two beautiful young daughters. At least one of the daughters, Wanda, was a pianist. He composed the Polonaise Brillante for her to practice with her cello-playing father. Chopin wrote later to a friend that the piece was merely a salon piece to be enjoyed casually and that he had written it in a manner so as to show off the young Wanda's pretty fingers. However, he must have held it in some high regard, for he included it on a concert tour in 1830, dedicating it to Joseph Merk, a renowned cellist. Chopin also later added an introduction to the Polonaise, making the piece Introduction and Polonaise Brillante. His friend, the great cellist August Joseph Franchomme, helped Chopin make necessary revisions before its publication in 1833.

Mirare - MIR089

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$18.50

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Chopin - Chamber Music

Chopin - Chamber Music


Chopin:

Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 65

Carter Brey (cello)

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Carter Brey (cello)

Grand Duo in E KKIIb/1

Carter Brey (cello)

Piano Trio in G minor Op. 8

Leila Josefowicz (violin) & Carter Brey (cello)


While there is no composition by Chopin that does not involve the piano, the cello is the only other instrument for which he wrote any significant music. His first effort was a polonaise written in 1829 when he was visiting the home of Prince Radziwill, governor of the Principality of Poznan and himself a composer and cellist of sorts. Writing to his friend Tytus Woyciechowski in November, he is rather dismissive of his ‘alla polacca’ describing it as ‘nothing more than a brilliant drawing-room piece suitable for the ladies’. He hoped that the Prince’s daughter, Wanda, would practise the piano part (he was supposed to be giving her lessons) in which case she must have been an accomplished pianist, though her father would not have found the cello part over-taxing. The following year Chopin added an introduction, inspired by his friendship in Vienna with the cellist Joseph Merk. The Introduction and Polonaise brillante in C major for piano and cello Op 3 was dedicated to Merk. Carl Czerny (1791–1857) produced a piano solo version of the work but in the 1980s an arrangement by Chopin himself was unearthed.

The Piano Trio in G minor Op 8 was composed a year earlier, in 1828, for private performance at ‘Antonin’, the home of Prince Radziwill. This is Chopin’s only example of writing for the violin, and it shows a surprising lack of flair (in the first movement, for instance, the violinist rarely moves out of first position). It is a genial work in four movements (Allegro con fuoco, Scherzo, Adagio sostenuto and an Allegretto finale) but there is little of the interplay between the three instruments of the kind that makes the trios of Beethoven, Schubert and Hummel such a delight. Chopin seems hampered by the confines of classical procedures, working ideas through dutifully rather than with individuality and imagination, though various commentators have praised the Trio as ‘one of the most perfect and, unfortunately, most neglected of Chopin’s works’ (Charles Willeby) and wondered why ‘so graceful and winning a piece is not more of a staple in the concert hall’ (Emanuel Ax).

In the chronology of works for cello and piano, the Grand Duo in E major on themes from Meyerbeer’s Robert le Diable comes next. The opera had a sensational premiere in Paris on 21 November 1831. Set in thirteenth-century Sicily, the libretto, ‘in which the grotesque is carried to the point of absurdity’ (Kobbé), was saved by Meyerbeer’s brilliant score, and the work made a fortune for the Paris Opéra. Its themes attracted dozens of composers including Thalberg, Kalkbrenner, Herz and Liszt. Chopin was commissioned by his publisher Schlesinger to write this potpourri, a brilliant display piece of the kind that was so popular in the Parisian salons of the time. After the piano’s Largo introduction, among the themes used are the Romanza and the chorus ‘Non pietà’ from Act 1, and ‘Le mie cure ancor dei cielo’ (Act 5). Composed in 1831, it is one of only four Chopin works published in his lifetime without an opus number and the only one to be composed in collaboration, in this case with his friend the cellist August Franchomme.

‘I write a little and cross out a lot’, Chopin wrote to his sister during the composition of his final major work, the Cello Sonata in G minor Op 65, written in Paris in 1845 and 1846. ‘Sometimes I am pleased with it, sometimes not. I throw it into a corner and then pick it up again.’ No work of his gave him more trouble, as manifested by the extensive sketches. It was the last one to be published during his lifetime, written when his health was failing. The four movements (Allegro moderato, Scherzo, Largo and Allegro) show how far Chopin had developed in his ability to form a closely integrated sonata structure, with ideas developing from a variety of short but related motifs.

For some of Chopin’s contemporaries it was a difficult work to grasp. Moscheles found ‘passages which sound to me like someone preluding on the piano, the player knocking at the door of every key and clef, to find if any melodious sounds were at home’, yet he thought well enough of it to make an arrangement for piano four hands. The Allegro moderato, especially, puzzled even Chopin’s intimates—players today find it the most problematic in terms of balance—and he omitted the movement at the premiere given by himself and Franchomme, the work’s dedicatee, on 16 February 1848. This first movement clearly had some hidden significance for him. Various commentators have noted in it thematic references from Schubert’s Winterreise, notably the initial phrase of ‘Gute Nacht’, the opening song. The subject of the song-cycle, the disappointed lover in despair at leaving his beloved, would seem to reflect the circumstances of Chopin’s life when he was writing the Sonata. There is evidence that he turned to Winterreise at the time of his separation from George Sand. Could that be why the first movement was not played at the premiere? Is that why on his deathbed he asked Franchomme to play it but could not bear to hear more than the opening bars?

“…Ohlsson proves himself a sensitive chamber musician, joining forces with violinist Leila Josefowicz and cellist Carter Brey in an extremely convincing performance of the much underrated Piano Trio.” BBC Music Magazine, February 2010 ****

Helios - CDH55384

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$9.50

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Popper - Prokofiev - Liszt - Chopin

Popper - Prokofiev - Liszt - Chopin


Chopin:

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Liszt:

Consolations, Six Pensées poétiques, S. 172

Popper:

Hungarian Rhapsody

Prokofiev:

Cello Sonata in C major, Op. 119


Maciej Kulakowski (cello), Dominika Glapiak (piano)

Dux - DUX0771

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$20.50

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Chopin: Complete Works for Cello and Piano

Chopin: Complete Works for Cello and Piano


Chopin:

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Variations brilliantes in B flat major on 'Je Vends des Scapulaires', Op. 12

Grand Duo for Cello and Piano (on themes from Meyerbeer's Robert le Diable)

Polonaise No. 2 in E flat minor, Op. 26 No. 2

Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 65


Sergei Istomin (cello), Viviana Sofronitsky (piano)

On this recording, Sofronitsky performs on copies of two of Chopin’s favourite pianos; a Conrad Graf piano ca. 1819 and a Pleyel piano of 1830.

Passacaille - PAS968

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$19.00

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Chopin: Chamber Music

Chopin: Chamber Music


Chopin:

Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 65

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Piano Trio in G minor Op. 8

Jakub Jakowicz (violin)


Jan Krzsztof Broja (piano), Andrzej Bauer (cello)

The latest release in this very well received series features the chamber works of Chopin. Broja has won many awards and has been acclaimed in the major concert halls of Eastern Europe. Bauer is also a prize winner and won a scholarship to study with William Pleeth.

“All the performers here are fine musicians, and the use of an 1849 Érard piano adds a four-dimensional perspective...An interesting release for the historically minded” BBC Music Magazine, December 2010 ***

Frederick Chopin Institute - The Real Chopin - NIFCCD013

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$19.00

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Ophelie Gaillard & Edna Stern play Chopin

Ophelie Gaillard & Edna Stern play Chopin

arranged for cello & piano by Edna Stern and Ophélie Gaillard


Chopin:

Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 65

Prelude Op. 28 No. 2 in A minor

Nocturne No. 12 in G major, Op. 37 No. 2

Prelude Op. 28 No. 4 in E minor

Nocturne No. 11 in G minor, Op. 37 No. 1

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Nocturne No. 19 in E minor, Op. 72 No. 1

Waltz No. 19 in A minor, Op. post., KKIVb:11, B 150


Ophélie Gaillard (cello) & Edna Stern (Pleyel piano 1843)

Edna Stern has been teaching at the Royal College of Music in London since September 2009. Her playing has prompted Diapason to say “Her piano playing bears the mark of three great pianists who formed her and of whom she managed to create an improbable synthesis : The panache of Martha Argerich, the musicality of Leon Fleisher and the impeccable finish of Krystian Zimerman.”

Forthcoming releases from Ophélie Gaillard will include Dreams: a collaboration with producer Craig Leon, whose album for Joshua Bell of transcriptions for violin and orchestra was unanimously acclaimed.

Aparté - AP003

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$18.50

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Cello capriccioso

Cello capriccioso


Cassadó:

Dance of the Green Devil

Requiebros

Serenade for cello and harp

Chopin:

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Dvorak:

Waldesruhe (Silent woods) for cello and orchestra, Op. 68 No. 5

Falla:

Danse Espagnole (from La Vida Breve)

Piatti:

Cello Sonata No. 2 in D major, Op. 29

Popper:

Dance of the Elves, Op. 39

Saint-Saëns:

Le carnaval des animaux: Le Cygne

Tchaikovsky:

Pezzo capriccioso, Op. 62 for cello & orchestra (or cello & piano)


Dmitri Atapine (cello), Hye-Yeon Park (piano)

Urtext - JBCC182

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Homage to Chopin

Homage to Chopin


Chopin:

Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 65

Introduction and Polonaise Brillante in C, Op. 3

Nocturne No. 2 in E flat major, Op. 9 No. 2

Nocturne No. 16 in E flat major, Op. 55 No. 2

Grand Duo for Cello and Piano (on themes from Meyerbeer's Robert le Diable)

Étude Op. 10 No. 6 in E flat minor 'Lacrimosa'

Étude Op. 25 No. 7 in C sharp minor

Nocturne No. 19 in E minor, Op. 72 No. 1


Armin Watkins (piano), Antony Cooke (cello)

Centaur - CRC2956

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