Borodin: Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

This page lists all recordings of Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances, by Alexander Profirevich Borodin (1833-87) on CD, SACD, DVD, Blu-ray & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade & Borodin: Polovtsian Dances

Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade & Borodin: Polovtsian Dances


Borodin:

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

London Philharmonic Choir & London Philharmonic Orchestra

Rimsky Korsakov:

Scheherazade, Op. 35

Concertgebouw Orchestra


For the first century of its history, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam had only four principal conductors, and it was the second and fourth, Willem Mengelberg and Bernard Haitink, who enjoyed a truly international reputation.

Previous issues on Eloquence from Haydn (476 8483) to Debussy (4646362) have shed light on the recordings made with the Concertgebouw by the third of its directors, Eduard van Beinum. With him the orchestra made many recordings for Decca which are being restored to the catalogue and uncovering the particular interpretative gifts identified by Classical Source: ‘With Van Beinum there is no artifice, just wholesome regard for the music. His is an intelligent approach to the music he plays through scrupulous attention to detail.’

Speaking of a recording made in July 1956 for Philips of Scheherezade, the four-movement tone poem in which Rimsky-Korsakov demonstrated his supreme gifts as an orchestrator, Classical Source called it ‘a superbly musical account, blessedly free of crass mannerisms and cheap vulgarities – with power and sensitivity in equal measure’. Particular praise was accorded on all sides to the solo part of the story-teller Scheherezade herself: ‘really beautiful solos by the Concertgebouw concertmaster of the day, Jan Damen’, noted Jay Nordlinger in the National Review.

This is among the fleetest accounts of Scheherezade on record, and Van Beinum’s control of line even at the swiftest of tempi is also a distinguishing feature of the Polovtsian Dances from Borodin’s unfinished magnum opus, Prince Igor. These were recorded with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus (singing in English) several years earlier.

“The orchestral playing in this issue of these vivid dances is positively brilliant – the whirling introductory dance is quite breathtaking.” Gramophone Magazine, November 1950 (Polovtsian Dances)

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4825511

(CD)

$8.75

(Sorry, download not available in your country)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Iván Fischer conducts Borodin & Tchaikovsky

Iván Fischer conducts Borodin & Tchaikovsky


Borodin:

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Czech Philharmonic Choir Brno

Tchaikovsky:

Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74 'Pathétique'


When Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky stepped onto the stage in Saint Petersburg on 28 October 1893 to introduce his Sixth Symphony to the public, he was received with a roar of applause. Three quarters of an hour later the astonished audience was dumbfounded. How could a symphony begin so softly and end even more so? And what about the second movement with its undanceable waltz, and the third with its unstoppable march? Nine days after the premiere, Tchaikovsky died in a city ravaged by cholera.

The truly Russian mood that we associate with Tchaikovsky is also felt in the music of Borodin. His opera ‘Prince Igor’ remained incomplete when he died, but the Overture, the Chorus and Dance of the Polovtsian girls, the Polovtsian March and the on this recording added well-known Polovtsian Dances, gained a place of its own in orchestral repertoire.

“Fischer once again doesn’t disappoint; indeed, he’s brought to light elements of this work, in particular textural detaileven during the loud brass-led sections, the strings can still be heard over the top with a clarity that seems barely believable.” David Smith, Presto Classical, 23rd September 2016

“The sheer natural musicality of Fischer’s Budapest players is, as always, refreshing...the March is poised and brilliant, and if the finale could be even darker, it is eloquently played.” Sunday Times, 2nd October 2016

Presto Disc of the Week

23rd September 2016

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

Channel - CCSSA37016

(SACD)

$15.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Borodin: Symphonies 1 & 2 & Polovtsian Dances

Borodin: Symphonies 1 & 2 & Polovtsian Dances


Borodin:

Symphony No. 1 in E flat major

Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, Valéry Gergiev

Symphony No. 2 in B minor

Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, Valéry Gergiev

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

London Opera Chorus & Philharmonia Orchestra, Vladimir Ashkenazy


Borodin’s First Symphony was one of his earliest large-scale works and shows a great increase of technical skill over anything he had done before. Of course, it was a brave decision on Borodin’s part to undertake a symphony when he had little experience of large-scale form and none of orchestration. The influence of Schumann is rather apparent, although the example of Berlioz is more heeded in the imaginative and many­hued orchestration.

The Second Symphony is one of Borodin’s masterpieces, finding the composer at the height of his capabilities. Given its strong musical ties with Prince Igor, outlined in Max Harrison’s booklet note, the filler on this CD – the ‘Polovtsian Dances’ from Prince Igor is particularly apt. What’s more, it’s the first international release of the Ashkenazy recording made in 1983 and coupled on the original LP with Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition.

“The Rotterdam orchestra is afforded a richness and sonority, plus an overall bloom on strings, winds and brass alike, which is most appealing” Gramophone Magazine, August 1991 (Gergiev)

“excellently recorded … Borodin’s Polovtsian Dances are vividly done” Gramophone Magazine, November 1983 (Ashkenazy)

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4808946

(CD)

$8.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Borodin: Symphony No. 2 in B minor

Borodin: Symphony No. 2 in B minor


Borodin:

Prince Igor Overture

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Prince Igor: Polovtsian March

In the Steppes of Central Asia

Symphony No. 2 in B minor


“A fizzing account of Symphony No. 2 supported by particularly strong playing from the RPO.” BBC Music Magazine, April 2014 ****

Alto - ALC1215

(CD)

$6.25

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Leonard Bernstein conducts Brahms, Liszt, Enescu & Borodin

Leonard Bernstein conducts Brahms, Liszt, Enescu & Borodin


Borodin:

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Brahms:

Hungarian Dance No. 5

Hungarian Dance No. 6 in D flat major

Enescu:

Romanian Rhapsody in A major, Op. 11 No. 1

Liszt:

Les Préludes, symphonic poem No. 3, S97

Hungarian Rhapsody, S244 No. 1 in E major

Hungarian Rhapsody, S244 No. 4 in E flat major


Sony Classical Masters - 88697712832

(CD)

$6.50

(also available to download from $11.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Romantic Russia

Romantic Russia


Borodin:

Prince Igor Overture

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

(completed and orchestrated by Rimsky-Korsakov & Glazunov)

Glinka:

Ruslan & Lyudmila Overture

Mussorgsky:

Khovanshchina: Prelude

(completed and orchestrated by Rimsky-Korsakov)

A Night on the Bare Mountain

(arranged Rimsky-Korsakov)


“A sizzling account of Borodin's Polovtsian Dances is the centrepiece here. Glinka's Ruslan and Lyudmila Overture is equally electrifying, yet there is tenderness, too, in Musorgsky's Khovanshchina Prelude. Solti fires up vintage LSO/Kingsway Hall performances.” BBC Music Magazine, August 2006 *****

“This arrangement by Rimsky-Korsakov (the serene ending to the piece is nowhere to be found in Mussorgsky's original, and actually uses music from his opera Sorochintsy Fair) is the version [of Night on a Bare Mountain] most familiar to many. Georg Solti conducts the London Symphony Orchestra in a vivid performance full of heaving lower strings and snarling brass.” James Longstaffe, Presto Classical, September 2014

Penguin Guide

Rosette Winner

Presto CD

Decca Rosette Collection - 4765310

(Presto CD)

$11.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Sir Adrian Boult Conducts the BBC SO

Sir Adrian Boult Conducts the BBC SO

Favourite Overtures


Auber:

Masaniello

Berlioz:

King Lear Overture, Op. 4

Les Francs-juges Overture, Op. 3

Borodin:

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Holst:

Scherzo for Orchestra, H192

Mendelssohn:

Hebrides Overture, Op. 26

Mozart:

Symphony No. 32 in G major, K318

Tchaikovsky:

Polonaise (from Eugene Onegin, Op. 24)


Dutton Historic - CDBP9763

(CD)

$7.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Die Moldau

Die Moldau


Borodin:

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Brahms:

Hungarian Dance No. 1 in G minor

Hungarian Dance No. 3 in F major

Hungarian Dance No. 10 in F major

Dvorak:

Slavonic Dance No. 1 in C Major, Op. 46 No. 1

Slavonic Dance No. 8 in G minor, Op. 46 No. 8

Liszt:

Les Préludes, symphonic poem No. 3, S97

Smetana:

Má Vlast: Vltava


Presto CD

DG Galleria - 4158512

(Presto CD)

$14.25

(also available to download from $8.25)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Borodin: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 3, Prince Igor & In the Steppes of Central Asia

Borodin: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 3, Prince Igor & In the Steppes of Central Asia


Borodin:

Symphony No. 2 in B minor

Symphony No. 3 in A minor (unfinished)

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Prince Igor Overture

In the Steppes of Central Asia


L'Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Choeur des Jeunes Lausanne, Choeur de Radio Lausanne, Ernest Ansermet

Borodin's second and third symphonies, plus the Overture and Polovstian Dances from Prince Igor and "In the Steppes of Central Asia" collect on a single CD all of Ernest Ansermet's Borodin recordings for Decca. All recordings have been widely praised for their dynamism and thrust, the Suisse Romande's weighty brass noted for its kindship with the Sultan's theme in Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade.

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4800048

(CD)

$8.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Russian Visionaries from Glinka to the Firebird

Russian Visionaries from Glinka to the Firebird


Borodin:

Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances

Danish RO, Issay Dobrowen

In the Steppes of Central Asia

London Symphony Orchestra, Albert Coates

Chopin:

Mazurka No. 33 in B major, Op. 56 No. 1

Konstantin Igumnov (piano)

Glinka:

Ruslan & Lyudmila Overture

Danish RO, Issay Dobrowen

The Lark

Vassily Sapellnikov (piano)

Mussorgsky:

On the southern shore of the Crimea (Gurzuf)

Alexander Kaminsky (piano)

Pabst:

Kolykol'naya pesna, Op. 18 No. 1

Konstantin Igumnov (piano)

Prokofiev:

Pieces (10), Op. 12: No. 1 - March

Michael Zadora (piano)

Rimsky Korsakov:

Sadko (tone poem), Op. 5

New York Philharmonic Society Orchestra, Igor Stravinsky

Scriabin:

Mazurka in F sharp, Op. 25 No. 7

Konstantin Igumnov (piano)

Poème in F sharp major, Op. 32 No. 1

Konstantin Igumnov (piano)

Poème, Op. 69, No.1

Vladimir Sofronitsky (piano)

Stravinsky:

Fireworks, Op. 4

New York Philharmonic Society Orchestra, Igor Stravinsky

Tchaikovsky:

Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35

Erica Morini (violin)

New York Philharmonic Society Orchestra, Georg Szell

Aveu Passioné in E minor

Konstantin Igumnov (piano)

Rêverie du soir (No. 1 from Morceaux (6), Op. 19)

Konstantin Igumnov (piano)

Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23

Alfred Hoehn (piano)

Stuttgart RSO, Wilhelm Buschkoetter

The Seasons, Op. 37b: November (Troika)

Sergei Rachmaninov (piano)

The Nutcracker Suite, Op. 71a

Berlin Staatsoper Orchestra, Oskar Fried


In 1850 Russia had one major composer and several piansts but within sixty years their music scene dominated the world's concert halls. We bring to light Stravinsky enrapt in a state of ecstacy while conducting a work by his mentor Rimsky-Korsakov. Our latest expedition follows pioneers who sought to either imitate Western music or excavate native Pagan, Mythic, and Central Asian sources. When Tchaikovsky's violin concerto hit Vienna, a critic wrote: "We know that in contemporary literature there have started to appear works whose authors love to reproduce in detail the most repulsive physiological phenomena, including foul smells. One might describe literature of that kind as stinking. Well, Tschaikowsky has shown us that there can also be stinking music." Musorgsky instead deprecated Westerners: "A German, when he thinks, starts by analyzing, then demonstrates, while our Russian brother starts by demonstrating, and only then amuses himself by analyzing." Performances include lost recordings by Erica Morini, Georg Szell, Alfred Hoehn, Rachmaninoff, Issay Dobrowen, Albert Coates, Michael Zadora, Konstantin Igumnov, Alexander Kamensky, Oskar Fried, Igor Stravinsky himself, and Vladimir Sofronitsky. Sounds and text follow a path that not only overturned the West's musical hegemony but became a risk to a Soviet regime that tried to recast them into obedient fodder for their obligatory Socialist Realism cult.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Arbiter - ARBITER164

(CD - 2 discs)

$26.25

Usually despatched in 4 - 5 working days.

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