Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

This page lists all recordings of Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-91) on CD, SACD, DVD, Blu-ray & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

Recommendations

Chamber Choice
May 2013
Concerto Choice
December 2016
Editor's Choice
November 2016
4 starRosette

All recordings

Prices shown exclude VAT. (UK tax is not payable for deliveries to United States.)
See Terms & Conditions for p&p rates.

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 11-13

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 11-13


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 11 in F major, K413

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Piano Concerto No. 12 in A major, K414


Sigiswald Kuijken (first violin), Veronica Kuijken, Marie Kuijken (fortepiano)

La Petite Bande

Mozart conceived the 3 piano-concerti KV 414, 413 and 415 in 1782, one year after he had settled in Vienna as a more or less free-lance musician. From onset, his idea was to get these works (KV 414, 413 and 415) published; he obviously expected a positive response from the public, not only on the financial level but also as a composer and piano virtuoso. In order to enhance the attraction for his publication, he decided to write these concertos in such a way that they could be performed not only with full orchestra (i.e. strings and winds), but also with a reduced accompaniment of only string quartet. Clearly, Mozart did not consider this strategic starting point as an artistic limitation, but rather as a challenge: in fact, already the score without the wind parts should leave nothing to be desired. This resulted in a very careful and beautiful string writing, matching the solo part in the most effective and intimate way. The wind parts were then conceived to accentuate and “colour” certain passages in the accompaniment with even more depth.

Although Mozart in his announcements and the print of these concerti always mentions the “normal” composition of the string quartet (2 violins, viola and violoncello), I took the liberty to replace the violoncello by a double bass in our performances and our recording of these concertos. My reason was purely musical. Looking and listening to these works, we find a clear difference concerning their string-bass writing compared with Mozart’s own quartets for violin, viola, violoncello and piano, or also his trios for violin, violoncello and piano.

In these piano concertos the string bass is only playing the essential bass-line of the whole texture, thus very often doubling in simplified way the soloist’s left hand. Therefore, in fact this so called “violoncello” part shows exactly what the usual “basso” parts show in orchestral works or generally in the more conventional divertimento-style: offering and strengthening the (highly necessary) fundamental bass on which the whole of the construction is resting. So replacing the violoncello by a double bass in this reduced version of these concertos seems to me an obvious choice.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

Challenge Classics - CC72752

(SACD)

$15.50

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart: The Vienna Concert: 23 March 1783

Mozart: The Vienna Concert: 23 March 1783


Mozart:

Die Zauberflöte, K620: Overture

Don Giovanni, K527: Overture

Gigue in G Major, K574

Se il padre perdei (from Idomeneo)

In un instante... Parto, m’affretto (from Lucio Silla)

Mia speranza adorata... Ah, non sai qual pena, K416

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Serenade No. 9 in D major, K320 'Posthorn': III. Concertante (Andante grazioso)

Symphony No. 35 in D major, K385 'Haffner'

Variations (10) in G major on Gluck's 'Unser dummer Pöbel meint', K455


Jodie Devos (soprano), Sebastian Wienand (fortepiano)

Millenium Orchestra, Leonardo García Alarcón

On 23 March 1783, an important concert took place in Vienna, playing a considerable role for Mozart’s reputation in the imperial capital, where he had resided since 1781. It is obvious that Mozart wanted to be heard in both what he had composed prior to 1781, as well as in his more recent works. From the Salzburg repertoire, he borrowed the ‘Haffner’ Symphony. To this he added the long concertante movement for wind instruments from the ‘Posthorn’ Serenade. Here we also find two piano concertos (one from Salzburg, and the latest, doubtless composed for the occasion), several arias from earlier operas (Lucio Silla, Idomeneo) or again, recently written. Although he played his concertos, he also improvised keyboard variations and even a fugue (because the emperor was in attendance)… An historic concert to be rediscovered, as if you were there!

Ricercar - RIC361

(CD - 2 discs)

$23.50

(also available to download from $20.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart: Piano Concertos K.415, 175, 503

Mozart: Piano Concertos K.415, 175, 503


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Piano Concerto No. 5 in D major, K175

Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major, K503


Olivier Cavé (piano)

Divertissement, Rinaldo Alessandrini

Olivier Cavé has already made several acclaimed discs for Aeon (Clementi, Haydn, Bach, Scarlatti). This student of Nelson Goerner, Maria Tipo and Aldo Ciccolini invariably impresses listeners with the refinement of his playing. Today he presents a programme of three piano concertos with a conductor whose ventures into Mozart are always crowned with success: Rinaldo Alessandrini. They met at a concert in Toulouse and decided to record these masterpieces. Rinaldo Alessandrini hasnformed an orchestra for the occasion, which he has christened ‘Divertissement’, and together they will embark on a European tour focusing on this programme and symphonies by Mozart at the time of the CD’s release. This programme follows an interesting path from Mozart’s youth to his maturity, a path that runs through three concertos, from no.5, composed when he was seventeen, to no.25, written the same year as Le nozze di Figaro, by way of the joyful and and subtle Concerto no.13, which he composed in 1783. All three are stylishly and nimbly performed here by the soloist and an orchestra containing a majority of Italian musicians.

Alpha - ALPHA243

(CD)

$15.00

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart: Piano Concertos, K.413-15

Mozart: Piano Concertos, K.413-15


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 11 in F major, K413

Piano Concerto No. 12 in A major, K414

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415


In January 1783 Mozart advertised in the Vienna press "the publication of three new, recently completed piano concertos", which could even be played with quartet accompaniment – thus enabling him to reach a wider public. In similar vein, he told his father that they were "very brilliant and pleasing to the ear . . . Here and there only connoisseurs will derive satisfaction from them – yet in such a way that the non-connoisseur will also be pleased, without knowing why."

It’s a fair bet that these dazzling performances by Kristian Bezuidenhout and the Freiburger Barockorchester will meet with the same unanimous approval.

“The rounded tone, singing legato in slow movements and crisp articulation he coaxes from the instrument is far removed from the honky-tonk sounds of earlier attempts at period performances of the concertos...This well-known music sounds spontaneous and freshly conceived.” Sunday Times, 21st August 2016

“a delightfully spirited performance from Kristian Bezuidenhout … this is the very opposite of ‘museum piece Mozart’, so alive and responsive” Record Review, 26th August 2016

“Bezuidenhout is an imaginative and engaging soloist, getting a variety of colours from his fortepiano.” Financial Times, 26th August 2016

“Though listed as director, Goltz is often closer to that of conductor, paying assiduous attention to instrumental balance, supporting or asserting as required. Only in the first movement of K414 is he a touch prosaic; otherwise he grants Bezuidenhout (who also plays continuo and uses the moderator for variations in tonal colour) the space needed for his searching interpretations. Every cadenza and lead-in is by Mozart; every slow movement is played with feeling. Very fine indeed” Classical Ear, 14th October 2016

“There’s plenty of interpretative freedom...as the soloist takes Mozart’s scores as a starting point rather than as the gospel handed down from above...he is superbly responsive to the music’s high spirits and to the possibilities inherent in these scores.” Gramophone Magazine, November 2016

“These are dazzling and at times unusually searching performances.” BBC Music Magazine, December 2016

GGramophone Magazine

Editor's Choice - November 2016

BBC Music Magazine

Concerto Choice - December 2016

Harmonia Mundi Bezuidenhout Mozart Series - HMC902218

(CD)

$13.25

(also available to download from $11.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 8, 11 & 13

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 8, 11 & 13


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 8 in C major, K246 "Lützow"

Piano Concerto No. 11 in F major, K413

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415


This is the ninth instalment in Ronald Brautigam’s series of the complete piano concertos by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. As on previous discs, Brautigam – whose ‘muscular yet sensitively nuanced command of Mozartian discourse’ (BBC Music Magazine) – is supported by Die Kölner Akademie under Michael Alexander Willens. The opening work on this instalment is the C major concerto, K 415, which was first performed on 23rd March 1783 in the presence of Emperor Joseph II. K 415 was composed in conjunction with the Concerto No. 11 in F major, K 413, which in contrast is a more intimate creation, especially in its Larghetto middle movement, in which Mozart achieves some of his most memorable writing, with the various textures of the orchestra providing a cushion of sound for a delicious cantabile aria for the piano – a model that was to become almost a trademark of his later concerto slow movements. The disc closes with Concerto No. 8 in C major, K 246, composed some six years earlier. Mozart wrote it for Countess Antonia Lützow, one of his father’s pupils, and in terms of technical difficulty, it is among the least demanding of his piano concertos – which nevertheless didn’t stop Mozart from performing it himself on several occasions.

“Ronald Brautigam and the Cologne Academy under Michael Alexander Willens offer stylish and enjoyable performances” BBC Music Magazine, February 2016 ****

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

BIS - up to 25% off

BIS Brautigam Mozart Concertos - BIS2074

(SACD)

Normally: $14.50

Special: $11.60

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart Piano Concertos Nos. 12, 13 & 14

Mozart Piano Concertos Nos. 12, 13 & 14

The Chamber Version


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 12 in A major, K414

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Piano Concerto No. 14 in E flat major, K449


Gottlieb Wallisch (piano)

Piatti Quartet

Winners of the St. Martins in the Fields Chamber Music Competition and two Hattori Foundation Awards, the Piatti Quartet is fast emerging as one of the UK’s leading young string quartets.

The Quartet’s debut recording features master Mozartian Gottlieb Wallisch in a stunning performance of his fellow Austrian’s own rarely-heard chamber orchestrations in ‘Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 12, 13 & 14’.

In contrast to the orchestral version the ensemble strikingly enhances the intricacies of the string writing and encourages immediate interaction among the five musicians.

Wallisch and the Piatti Quartet performed this repertoire to packed audiences at various venues and festivals across the UK in the summer and autumn of 2011.

In 2012 the Piatti Quartet (Charlotte Scott 1st violin, Michael Trainor 2nd violin, David Wigram viola, Jessie Ann Richardson cello) were chosen for the UK-wide ‘Future Classics Classical Tour’ designed to promote the ‘stars of tomorrow’.

The Quartet has performed at both the Newbury Spring Festival and the Bath International Festivals plus major UK venues UK including the Purcell room, Conway Hall, St Georges (Bristol), The Queens Hall (Edinburgh) and has made numerous appearances live on BBC Radio 3.

Named a Steinway Artist in 2012, Gottlieb Wallisch is a competition prize-winner and a respected artist in the Viennese piano tradition.

Wallisch has performed with many leading orchestras including the Vienna Philharmonic, Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and BBC National Orchestra of Wales and has appeared at leading festivals and in major concert halls including the Salzburg Festival, Lucerne Festival, Klavierfestival Ruhr, Carnegie Hall, Wigmore Hall, Tonhalle Zurich, Musikhalle Hamburg and Singapore Arts Festival amongst others.

“Wallisch is a robust, rather plain-speaking Mozartian, more concerned with the long view than poetic detail...There are good things in the two earlier concertos: say, the care for a broad, singing line in the solemn Andante of K414, and Wallisch's clarity and vigour in K415's contrapuntal sallies” Gramophone Magazine, August 2013

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

Linn - CKD424

(SACD)

$10.25

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 13 & 20 & Six German Dances, KV 509

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 13 & 20 & Six German Dances, KV 509


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Julius Katchen (piano)

New Symphony Orchestra of London, Peter Maag

Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K466

Julius Katchen (piano)

New Symphony Orchestra of London, Peter Maag

German Dances (6), K509

London Symphony Orchestra, Peter Maag


Julius Katchen recorded two Mozart piano concertos with Peter Maag and they both appear on this CD, together with the Six German Dances, KV 509 – ‘a magnificent example of the power of a genuinely charismatic conductor’ as Tully Potter notes in his liner notes. Katchen first entered Decca’s London studios in 1947 and was still heavily involved in a major Brahms project when he died of cancer in Paris, the city that had long been his home. He made his debut at the age of ten, playing the Mozart D minor concerto. Like Peter Maag, he was a philosopher, having completed a four-year course at Haverford College in three years. A musician of immense warmth – as witnessed in these Mozart readings – his colossal technique was always understated.

Unfairly neglected, Mozart’s C major Concerto, KV 415 is a gem. At the time of this recording (1955), it was only the third to appear. Cor de Groot’s performance had the honour of being the first LP version and this was preceded by Artur Balsam’s 78rpm recording. It was to be another five years before the concerto was to be recorded again – in 1960 by Clara Haskil. The D minor Concerto is Mozart’s most Beethovenian, and indeed it is Beethoven’s cadenzas that Katchen uses for his recording. (For the C major concerto, even though Mozart’s cadenzas survive, Katchen does not play them, using one of his own in the opening movement.) Word has it that Mozart wrote his delightful set of six German Dances, KV 509 in one hour during an enjoyable trip to Prague in 1787. Unfathomably neglected, they were taped for this recording in Kingsway Hall in January 1959 and make their first appearance here since their initial release on a ten-inch LP.

“Nobody really plays Mozart like this today. Recorded in the 1950s, the Concertos are full-toned and dramatic; K415 emerges larger and more serious than usual.” BBC Music Magazine, May 2012 ***

“The recording is clear; the orchestral playing adept” Gramophone Magazine (Concertos)

“Katchen's Mozart is a joy, in which the musical dialogue, whether within the solo part or when it is pitted against the orchestra, provides a constant effervescent narrative.” Gramophone Magazine

Australian Eloquence - ELQ4803609

(CD)

$8.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart-Contrasts: Piano Concertos Nos. 12, 13 & 26

Mozart-Contrasts: Piano Concertos Nos. 12, 13 & 26

and piano works in minor keys


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 12 in A major, K414

Camerata Bern, Erich Hobarth

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Camerata Bern, Erich Hobarth

Piano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K537 'Coronation'

Camerata Bern, Erich Hobarth

Fantasia in D minor, K397

Fantasia in C minor, K475

Piano Sonata No. 8 in A minor, K310

Piano Sonata No. 14 in C minor, K457

Rondo in A minor, K511

Adagio in B minor, K540


Oliver Schnyder (piano)

RCA - 88697323172

(CD - 2 discs)

$17.50

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 19, 13 and 20

Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 19, 13 and 20


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 19 in F major, K459

Berliner Philharmoniker

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

RIAS Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin

Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K466

RIAS Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin


Three rare encounters between Clara Haskil and Ferenc Fricsay, which display a unique approach to Mozart. The Hungarian’s precise conducting sets to advantage the soloist’s purity of style. This rare combination of a familiar studio recording of the Concerto in F major and two live concerto performances is the epitome of limpidity.

“The jewel of this generously filled CD (82 minutes) is the live D minor, K466, with the great Haskil at her best, ably partnered by Fricsay and the RIAS orchestra.” Sunday Times, 16th January 2017

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Praga Digitals - PRD250347

(CD)

$14.50

This item is currently out of stock at the UK distributor. You may order it now but please be aware that it may be six weeks or more before it can be despatched.

Philippe Entremont Plays and Conducts Mozart

Philippe Entremont Plays and Conducts Mozart


Mozart:

Piano Concerto No. 13 in C major, K415

Piano Concerto No. 17 in G major, K453


Philippe Entremont (piano/conductor)

Collegium Musicum of Paris, Philippe Entremont

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Sony - G010003653364Z

Download only from $10.00

Available now to download.

Page: 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

 Next >>

Copyright © 2002-17 Presto Classical Limited, all rights reserved.