Warlock: Cradle Song

This page lists all recordings of Cradle Song, by Peter Warlock (1894-1930) on CD & download (MP3 & FLAC).

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Songs by Peter Warlock

Songs by Peter Warlock


Warlock:

The Wind from the West

To the Memory of a Great Singer

Take, O take those lips away

As ever I saw

The bayley berith the bell away

There is a lady sweet and kind

Lullaby 'Golden slumbers kiss your eyes'

Sweet Content

Late Summer

The Singer

Rest, sweet nymphs

Sleep

A Sad Song

In an Arbour Green

Autumn Twilight

I held love's head

Thou gav'st me leave to kiss

Yarmouth Fair

Pretty Ring Time

A Prayer to St Anthony

The Sick Heart

Robin Goodfellow

Jillian of Berry

Fair and True

Ha'nacker Mill

The Night

My Own Country

The First Mercy

The Lover's Maze

Cradle Song

Sigh no more, ladies

Passing By

The Contented Lover

The Fox


Philip Heseltine was born in London in 1894 and in his short life won public acclaim for the songs he wrote under the pseudonym Peter Warlock. He was particularly noted for his settings of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century texts, and brought the most delicate sensibility of the music of that period to his compositions. Warlock was considered an authority on Elizabethan music and in the course of his life he edited over three hundred Elizabethan and Jacobean lute songs for voice and keyboard or for choir.

Rarely can these works have been so beautifully and movingly performed on record as in this celebrated album, featuring John Mark Ainsley at the peak of his considerable powers, perfectly accompanied by Roger Vignoles.

“This is surely one of the best representations of Warlock on records” American Record Guide

“Whether you collect tenors, English music or simply good singing, don’t be without this” BBC Music Magazine

“Enthusiastically recommended” Fanfare

“Singer and song are ideally matched, pianist and piano part likewise, and the shade of Philip Heseltine should gain contentment” Gramophone Magazine

Helios - CDH55442

(CD)

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The Curlew

The Curlew

Songs by Peter Warlock


Warlock:

In an Arbour Green

Autumn Twilight

Late Summer

Pretty Ring Time

A Sad Song

Mr Belloc's Fancy

Ha'nacker Mill

The Night

My Own Country

Sleep

The Curlew

The First Mercy

Adam lay ybounden

Bethlehem Down

The Frostbound Wood

Cradle Song

My lady is a pretty one

Music when soft voices die

Yarmouth Fair

The Contented Lover

And wilt thou leave me thus?

Mourn no moe

Jillian of Berry

Captain Stratton's Fancy


Andrew Kennedy & Simon Lepper

Pavão Quartet

Landor Records - LAN279

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The English Songbook

The English Songbook


anon.:

The Death of Queen Jane

Britten:

Down by the Salley Gardens

Browne, W D:

To Gratiana dancing and singing

Delius:

Twilight Fancies

Dunhill:

The Cloths of Heaven, Op. 30/3

Finzi:

The dance continued

Since we loved

German:

Orpheus with his lute

Grainger:

Bold William Taylor

Brigg Fair

Gurney:

Sleep

I will go with my father a-ploughing

Parry:

No longer mourn for me

Quilter:

Come away, death

Now sleeps the crimson petal, Op. 3 No. 2 (Tennyson)

Somervell:

To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars

Stanford:

La Belle Dame sans merci (John Keats) (1877)

My love's an arbutus (Old Irish air)

trad.:

The Turtle Dove

Vaughan Williams:

Linden Lea

Silent Noon

Warlock:

Jillian of Berry

Cradle Song

Rest, sweet nymphs


Ian Bostridge (tenor), Julius Drake (piano)

“The recital begins with Keats and ends with Shakespeare: that can't be bad. But it also begins with Stanford and ends with Parry; what would the modernists of their time have thought about that? They would probably not have believed that those two pillars of the old musical establishment would still be standing by in 1999. And in fact how well very nearly all these composers stand! Quilter's mild drawing–room manners might have been expected to doom him, but the three songs here – the affectionate, easy grace of his Tennyson setting, the restrained passion of his 'Come away, death' and the infectious zest of 'I will go with my father a–ploughing' – endear him afresh and demonstrate once again the wisdom of artists who recognise their own small area of 'personal truth' and refuse to betray it in exchange for a more fashionable 'originality'.
Likewise Finzi, whose feeling for Hardy's poems is so modestly affirmed in 'The dance continued'.
Does that song, incidentally, make deliberate reference, at 'those songs we sang when we went gipsying', to Jillian of Berry by Warlock (whose originality speaks for itself)? Jillian of Berry itself perhaps calls for more full–bodied, less refined tones than Bostridge's. One could do with a ruddier glow and more rotund fruitiness in the voice. Yet for most of the programme he isn't merely a well–suited singer but an artist who brings complete responsiveness to words and music. The haunted desolation of Delius's Twilight Fancies is perfectly caught in the pale hue of the voice which can nevertheless give body and intensity to the frank cry of desire, calming then to pianissimo for the last phrase amid the dim echoes of hunting horns in the piano part. Julius Drake plays with strength of imagination and technical control to match Bostridge's own.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

Warner Classics - 5568302

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