Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

This page lists all recordings of The Rake's Progress, by Igor Feodorovich Stravinsky (1882-1971) on CD, DVD, Blu-ray & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Recorded live at the Glyndebourne Opera House, 18 & 19 December, 2010


Miah Persson (Anne Trulove), Topi Lehtipuu (Tom Rakewell), Clive Bayley (Father Trulove), Matthew Rose (Nick Shadow), Susan Gorton (Mother Goose), Elena Manistina (Baba the Turk) & Graham Clark (Sellem)

The Glyndebourne Chorus & London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir Jurowski (conductor) & John Cox (director)

In this celebrated Glyndebourne Festival production, David Hockney’s designs for director John Cox reinterpret the Hogarth etchings that inspired the opera’s libretto, written for Stravinsky by W.H. Auden and Chester Kallman.

In 2010, this revival under Glyndebourne’s Music Director, Vladimir Jurowski, captured the opera’s neo-classical spirit and its juxtaposition of whimsy, cynicism and compassion, prompting the Financial Times to call it, ‘‘as enjoyable a performance of Stravinsky’s opera as any that has come along".

Extra features:

Documentary includes interview with David Hockney Introduction to the Rakes’s Progress Running time 150 mins

Region Code All regions

Picture format 1080i High Definition / 16:9

Sound format 2.0LPCM + 5.1(5.0) DTS

Menu languages EN

Subtitles EN/FR/DE/ES

“Full of colour and light, and brimming with wit, this is a production that lifts the performers...Lehtipuu conveys [Tom's] fresh-faced innocence, making his gradual demise all the more heart-breaking. Bass Matthew Rose is not the most chilling Nick Shadow, but is all the more believable as an apparently supportive, and likeable, friend to Tom, until the veil drops...[Persson] underpins [Anne's] heartfelt love with a steely determination...An absolute triumph.” BBC Music Magazine, January 2012 *****

“It is hard to imagine a Tom Rakewell who looks the part better than the lanky, almost adolescent Topi Lehtipuu, his wide-eyed innocence an open invitation to corruption, and he sings the role with elegance. Miah Persson is almost his equal...The combination of Vladimir Jurowski and the London Philharmonic Orchestra ensures crisp ensemble of the highest quality.”” Gramophone Magazine, March 2012

“Star of the show - as she is so often - is Miah Persson, who turns out to be a radiant and steadfast Anne...[Lehtipuu] manages to give us a Tom whoe fundamentally endearing qualities shine through, even when he's at his most cocky...Matthew Rose's portrayal of Nick Shadow has been criticized in some quarters for its lack of venom, but I find that the mellifluous coating to his malevolence only adds to the effect.” International Record Review, February 2012

BBC Music Magazine

DVD/Blu-ray Choice - January 2012

Blu-ray Disc

Region: all

Opus Arte Glyndebourne - OAB7094D

(Blu-ray)

$33.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Recorded live at Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie, Brussels on 26th & 28th April 2007.


Andrew Kennedy (Tom Rakewell), Laura Claycomb (Anne Trulove), William Shimell (Nick Shadow), Julianne Young (Mother Goose), Dagmar Peckova (Baba the Turk), Darren Jeffery (Trulove), Donal J. Byrne (Sellem)

Symphony Orchestra & Chorus of la Monnaie de Munt, Kazushi Ono (conductor) & Robert Lepage (stage director)

Note: This Blu-ray Disc (BD) is not compatible with standard DVD players.

Stravinsky’s masterwork The Rake’s Progress, created for La Fenice in Venice in 1951, is based on a libretto by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman, inspired by a series of 18th century prints by William Hogarth. This amazing production from La Monnaie–De Munt ‘jazzifies’ the setting by replacing Hogarth’s sin city, London, with 1950s Las Vegas, turning it into a glittering, cinematic gallery of tableaux vivants inspired by the early days of television. Staged by one of the most visionary theatre directors of our age, the Québécois Robert Lepage, the neo-classical morality tale truly becomes a grand spectacle. Lepage’s visual imagination works its magic superbly, while Kazushi Ono’s energetic musical direction drives the sparkling ensemble to exhilarating heights.

Bonus material:

Interview with stage director Robert Lepage

Behind the scenes & rehearsal footage

Photo gallery

Cast gallery & illustrated synopsis

‘Lepage has forged a reputation as one of the most visionary theatre directors of our age… The Rake’s Progress is heading our way, and it promises to be a highlight of the 2007/8 season.’ Sunday Times

PICTURE FORMAT: 1080i
LENGTH: 74 Mins
SOUND: 2.0 & 5.0 PCM
SUBTITLES: EN/FR/DE/ES/IT/NL

“This is a show to be seen - Covent Garden is staging it in July - and, down to the witty, period and silent menu screens, a model of its kind.” Gramophone Magazine, May 2008

“It seems perverse to place it in Las Vegas in the 1950s, as Robert Lepage has done, with stetsons, risqué revue turns and black-and-white TV … Yet when we arrive at the graveyard scene, and then the incredibly moving mad scene in Bedlam, it is all so wonderful that I felt it had been worth persevering. Musically, it is first-rate.” BBC Music Magazine, May 2008 ****

“Lepage has forged a reputation as one of the most visionary theatre directors of our age… The Rake’s Progress is heading our way, and it promises to be a highlight of the 2007/8 season.” Sunday Times

“Auden first met Stravinsky to discuss the libretto of The Rake's Progress in Hollywood in 1947, and Robert Lepage winds forward his 'clock of fashion' to the time and place of the opera's composition. Hogarth's Gin Alley runs into Easy Street, populated by Vegas hookers, dancers and chancers. The composer-sanctioned division into two halves rather than three acts is a complementary move from the conventions of the opera house to the theater, and what a show we have. Madam, or rather Mother Goose (Julianne Young, bearing a disconcerting resemblance to Julianne Moore), lures the naive Tom onto a heart-shaped satin bed, and the pair literally sink into its folds – before our hero re-emerges, worldly wise and weary, in front of a blow-up Winnebago, and banishes ennui not with mother's ruin but a line or two of Colombia's finest. Andrew Kennedy takes all this in his stride, and his always fresh, appealing tenor ensures we retain our sympathy through Tom's piteous downfall from indolence to insanity, far more so than we are likely to for his operatic model, Ferrando. From Nick Shadow's first entrance under the shade of a Dallas derrick to his flame-capped Broadway nemesis, the parallels are not with Dons Alfonso or Giovanni but rather Alberich. This is largely thanks to William Shimell's ironblack baritone and rasping wit, though lines such as 'That man alone is free who chooses what to will and wills his choice as destiny' certainly strike a Wagnerian ring of mania. The recorded balance is slightly unfavourable to Laura Claycomb in 'I go to him': this is her 'Abscheulicher', but she is no Leonora, and is happiest vocally when she is dramatically downcast. The two crucial scenes, either side of the interval, between her, Tom and Dagmar Pecková's show-stealing Baba are models of ensemble writing and direction, pulling between operatic naturalism and Stravinsky's preferred realism just as Tom is torn between one woman and the other – and all in front of a chorus who change from waltz-time party guests to painfully well observed inhabitants of Bedlam with phenomenal assurance. Doubtless Kazushi Ono must take credit for some slickly cinematic pacing. This is a show to be seen and, down to the witty, period and silent menu screens, a model of its kind.” Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

Blu-ray Disc

Region: all

Opus Arte - OABD7038D

(Blu-ray - 2 discs)

$33.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress


Jayne West, Jon Garrison, ArthurWoodley, John Cheek, Shirley Love, Wendy White, Melvin Lowery & Jeffrey Johnson

Gregg Smith Singers & Orchestra of St. Luke’s, Robert Craft

Robert Craft first met Stravinsky on the same day that Auden delivered the completed libretto to the composer, and was directly involved in what he describes as “the first step” in the composition of The Rake’s Progress.

This was principally with regard to helping Stravinsky master the pronunciation, vocabulary and rhythms of the English text, and sharing the composer’s excitement as the brilliantly conceived score took shape.

This 1993 recording, conducted by Craft, is no less significant than Stravinsky’s 1953 Metropolitan Opera recording, available on Naxos Historical 8111266-67.

“Craft understands Stravinsky's music better than anyone.” Fanfare

“An Anglophone cast benefits Auden and Kallman's text while Robert Craft's neat conducting highlights the delicate ironies of Stravinsky's neo-classical score.” BBC Music Magazine, November 2009 ***

Naxos Clearance - up to 70% off

Naxos Opera Classics - 8660272-73

(CD - 2 discs)

Normally: $16.75

Special: $5.02

(also available to download from $14.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress


Eugene Conley (Tom Rakewell), Hilde Güden (Anne Trulove), Mack Harrell (Nick Shadow), Norman Scott (Trulove), Blanche Thebom (Baba the Turk), Martha Lipton (Mother Goose), Paul Franke (Sellem), Lawrence Davidson (Keeper)

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Metropolitan Opera Chorus, Igor Stravinsky

Sony - G010003467564H

Download only from $15.00

Available now to download.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress


Judith Raskin (Anne Trulove), Alexander Young (Tom Rakewell), John Reardon (Nick Shadow), Don Garrard (Trulove), Jean Manning (Mother Goose), Regina Sarfaty (Baba the Turk), Kevin Miller (Sellem), Peter Tracey (Keeper)

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Sadler's Wells Opera Chorus, Igor Stravinsky

Sony - G010003471989X

Download only from $15.00

Available now to download.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress


Paul Plishka (Nick Shadow), Anthony Rolfe-Johnson (Tom Rakewell), Sylvia McNair (Anne Trulove), Donald Adams (Trulove), Jane Henschel (Baba the Turk), Ian Bostridge (Sellem), Raymond Aceto (Keeper), Jane Bunnell (Mother Goose)

Saito Kinen Orchestra, Tokyo Opera Singers, Seiji Ozawa

Decca - 4823791

(Sorry, download not available in your country)

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Live recording from the Glyndebourne Festival Opera, 1975


Felicity Lott (Anne), Leo Goeke (Tom Rakewell), Richard Van Allan (Trulove, Anne’s father), Samuel Ramey (Nick Shadow) & Rosalind Elias (Baba the Turk)

The London Philharmonic Orchestra, Bernard Haitink (conductor) & John Cox (stage director)

Stage Designer David Hockney

First performed in 1951 at the theatre La Fenice in Venice, the opera The Rake’s Progress was given its first British performance by the Glyndebourne Opera Festival. This recording is the famous and striking 1975 John Cox production which has been described as “brilliant stroke” (The Daily Telegraph) and as “a virtuoso piece of production and design”.

The designer on the production was the British painter David Hockney, one of today’s leading artists. His highly individual sets, based on the Hogarth’s series of prints, reflect perfectly the “spikiness” of the music, combined with the underlying tenderness of the theme of true love. The Dutch conductor Bernard Haitink, one of the most influential of his time, has the musical direction over a top-class ensemble of soloists – headed by Leo Goeke in the title role, who sang frequently in Glyndebourne, and Felicity Lott, one of the most important English opera singers, who became “Dame of the British Empire” in 1996.

Sound Formats: PCM Stereo

Picture Format: 4:3

DVD Format: DVD 9 / NTSC

Subtitle Languages: GB (Original Language), DE, FR, ES

Running Time: 146 mins

FSK: 0

Region Code: 0

Worldwide available excluding USA

DVD Video

Region: 0

Format: NTSC

Arthaus and Euroarts Sale - up to 60% off

Arthaus Musik - 102314

(DVD Video)

Normally: $17.00

Special: $13.60

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress


Robert Rounseville, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Otakar Kraus, Jennie Tourel

Igor Stravinsky

Venice 1951

Opera dOro - OPD1488

(CD - 2 discs)

$11.25

(also available to download from $20.00)

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days. (Available now to download.)

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Recorded live at the Glyndebourne Opera House, 18 & 19 December, 2010


Miah Persson (Anne Trulove), Topi Lehtipuu (Tom Rakewell), Clive Bayley (Father Trulove), Matthew Rose (Nick Shadow), Susan Gorton (Mother Goose), Elena Manistina (Baba the Turk) & Graham Clark (Sellem)

The Glyndebourne Chorus & London Philharmonic Orchestra, Vladimir Jurowski (conductor) & John Cox (director)

In this celebrated Glyndebourne Festival production, David Hockney’s designs for director John Cox reinterpret the Hogarth etchings that inspired the opera’s libretto, written for Stravinsky by W.H. Auden and Chester Kallman.

In 2010, this revival under Glyndebourne’s Music Director, Vladimir Jurowski, captured the opera’s neo-classical spirit and its juxtaposition of whimsy, cynicism and compassion, prompting the Financial Times to call it, ‘‘as enjoyable a performance of Stravinsky’s opera as any that has come along".

Extra features:

Documentary includes interview with David Hockney Introduction to the Rakes’s Progress Running time 150 mins

Region Code All regions

Picture format 16:9 Anamorphic

Sound format 2.0LPCM + 5.1(5.0) DTS

Menu languages EN

Subtitles EN/FR/DE/ES

“Full of colour and light, and brimming with wit, this is a production that lifts the performers...Lehtipuu conveys [Tom's] fresh-faced innocence, making his gradual demise all the more heart-breaking. Bass Matthew Rose is not the most chilling Nick Shadow, but is all the more believable as an apparently supportive, and likeable, friend to Tom, until the veil drops...[Persson] underpins [Anne's] heartfelt love with a steely determination...An absolute triumph.” BBC Music Magazine, January 2012 *****

“It is hard to imagine a Tom Rakewell who looks the part better than the lanky, almost adolescent Topi Lehtipuu, his wide-eyed innocence an open invitation to corruption, and he sings the role with elegance. Miah Persson is almost his equal...The combination of Vladimir Jurowski and the London Philharmonic Orchestra ensures crisp ensemble of the highest quality.” Gramophone Magazine, March 2012

“Star of the show - as she is so often - is Miah Persson, who turns out to be a radiant and steadfast Anne...[Lehtipuu] manages to give us a Tom whoe fundamentally endearing qualities shine through, even when he's at his most cocky...Matthew Rose's portrayal of Nick Shadow has been criticized in some quarters for its lack of venom, but I find that the mellifluous coating to his malevolence only adds to the effect.” International Record Review, February 2012

BBC Music Magazine

DVD Choice - January 2012

DVD Video

Region: 0

Format: NTSC

Opus Arte Glyndebourne - OA1062D

(DVD Video)

$28.25

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

Stravinsky: The Rake's Progress

A flamboyant new production from Robert Lepage, who also directed the internationally renowned Cirque du Soleil in 2005.


Laura Claycomb (Anne Trulove), Andrew Kennedy (Tom Rakewell), William Shimell (Nick Shadow), Julianne Young (Mother Goose), Dagmar Peckova (Baba the Turk), Darren Jeffery (Trulove), Donal J. Byrne (Sellem)

Symphony Orchestra & Chorus of la Monnaie de Munt, Kazushi Ono

Recorded live at Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie, Brussels, on 26th & 28th April 2007.

PICTURE FORMAT: 16:9
LENGTH: Approx 154 Mins
SOUND: DTS 5.1 SURROUND / LPCM STEREO
SUBTITLES: EN/FR/DE/ES/IT/NL

“It seems perverse to place it in Las Vegas in the 1950s, as Robert Lepage has done, with stetsons, risqué revue turns and black-and-white TV … Yet when we arrive at the graveyard scene, and then the incredibly moving mad scene in Bedlam, it is all so wonderful that I felt it had been worth persevering. Musically, it is first-rate.” BBC Music Magazine, May 2008 ****

“This is a show to be seen - Covent Garden is staging it in July - and, down to the witty, period and silent menu screens, a model of its kind.” Gramophone Magazine, May 2008

“Lepage has forged a reputation as one of the most visionary theatre directors of our age… The Rake’s Progress is heading our way, and it promises to be a highlight of the 2007/8 season.” Sunday Times

“Auden first met Stravinsky to discuss the libretto of The Rake's Progress in Hollywood in 1947, and Robert Lepage winds forward his 'clock of fashion' to the time and place of the opera's composition.
Hogarth's Gin Alley runs into Easy Street, populated by Vegas hookers, dancers and chancers. The composer-sanctioned division into two halves rather than three acts is a complementary move from the conventions of the opera house to the theater, and what a show we have. Madam, or rather Mother Goose (Julianne Young, bearing a disconcerting resemblance to Julianne Moore), lures the naive Tom onto a heart-shaped satin bed, and the pair literally sink into its folds – before our hero re-emerges, worldly wise and weary, in front of a blow-up Winnebago, and banishes ennui not with mother's ruin but a line or two of Colombia's finest.
Andrew Kennedy takes all this in his stride, and his always fresh, appealing tenor ensures we retain our sympathy through Tom's piteous downfall from indolence to insanity, far more so than we are likely to for his operatic model, Ferrando.
From Nick Shadow's first entrance under the shade of a Dallas derrick to his flame-capped Broadway nemesis, the parallels are not with Dons Alfonso or Giovanni but rather Alberich.
This is largely thanks to William Shimell's ironblack baritone and rasping wit, though lines such as 'That man alone is free who chooses what to will and wills his choice as destiny' certainly strike a Wagnerian ring of mania.
The recorded balance is slightly unfavourable to Laura Claycomb in 'I go to him': this is her 'Abscheulicher', but she is no Leonora, and is happiest vocally when she is dramatically downcast.
The two crucial scenes, either side of the interval, between her, Tom and Dagmar Pecková's show-stealing Baba are models of ensemble writing and direction, pulling between operatic naturalism and Stravinsky's preferred realism just as Tom is torn between one woman and the other – and all in front of a chorus who change from waltz-time party guests to painfully well observed inhabitants of Bedlam with phenomenal assurance.
Doubtless Kazushi Ono must take credit for some slickly cinematic pacing. This is a show to be seen and, down to the witty, period and silent menu screens, a model of its kind.”
Gramophone Classical Music Guide, 2010

DVD Video

Region: 0

Format: NTSC

Opus Arte - OA0991D

(DVD Video - 2 discs)

$33.75

Usually despatched in 2 - 3 working days.

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