Tallis: Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

This page lists all recordings of Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet', by Thomas Tallis (c.1505-85) on CD, SACD & download (MP3 & FLAC). Generally, more recent releases are listed first, but with priority given to those that are in stock.

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December 2003
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Utopia Triumphans

Utopia Triumphans

The Great Polyphony of the Renaissance


Despres:

Qui habitat

Gabrieli, G:

Exaudi me Domine

Manchicourt:

Laudate Dominum

Ockeghem:

Deo gratias

Porta, C:

Sanctus

Agnus Dei

Striggio:

Ecce beatam lucem

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'


Huelgas Ensemble, Paul van Nevel

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Sony - 88843030992

(CD)

$12.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Tallis: Spem in Alium

Tallis: Spem in Alium


Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

Lamentations of Jeremiah I & II

Motets


La Chappelle du Roi, Alistair Dixon

La Chappelle du Roi give highly praised and beautifully sung performances of Tallis’ most famous works including Spem in Alium and the Lamentations of Jeremiah I&II. Super budget price.

Regis - RRC1394

(CD)

$7.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Renaissance Masterpieces

Renaissance Masterpieces


Allegri:

Miserere mei, Deus

Stephen Cleobury

Byrd:

Mass for five voices

Sir Philip Ledger

Monteverdi:

Vespro della beata Vergine (1610): excerpts

Elly Ameling, Norma Burrowes (soprano), Charles Brett (countertenor), Robert Tear, Anthony Rolfe Johnson, Martyn Hill (tenor), Peter Knapp, John Noble (baritone)

Sir Philip Ledger

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

Stephen Cleobury


This disc features some of the best-loved works of the 16th and 17th centuries, sung by the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge. The choir has a rich and long-standing tradition of singing this repertoire, and these recordings also present distinguished soloists who began their musical career as King’s choral scholars, such as Charles Brett, Robert Tear, Martyn Hill and Gerald Finley.

EMI Masters - 6783042

(CD)

$11.25

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Striggio: Mass in 40 Parts (Missa Ecco si Beato Giorno)

Striggio: Mass in 40 Parts (Missa Ecco si Beato Giorno)

1CD+1DVD


Galilei, V:

Contrapunto Secondo di BM

Gregorian Chant:

Spem in alium

Sarum Plainchant

Striggio:

Ecce beatam lucem

Mass in 40 Parts (Missa Ecco si Beato Giorno)

Fuggi, spene mia

O giovenil ardire

Altr’io che queste spighe

D’ogni gratia et d’amor

O de la bella Etruria

Caro dolce ben mio

Misero ohime

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

DVD

1. Striggio – Ecce beatam lucem (5.1 Surround Sound)

2. Striggio – Missa ecco si beato giorni (5.1 Surround Sound)

3. Tallis – Spem in alium (5.1 Surround Sound)

4. The Making of Striggio – Documentary (English/ French/ German)


Celebrating the Rediscovery of a Long-lost Mass in 40 Parts.

A feast of Renaissance choral music from Italy and England, the album (and bonus DVD) reveals a work by the Italian, Alessandro Striggio – believed lost until the recent discovery of vocal parts, in Paris.

Striggio travelled extensively to the courts of Europe and it was probably a performance during his visit to Elizabethan England in 1567 that inspired Tallis to write Spem in alium, which is performed here with rarely heard instrumental accompaniment and the benefit of a major piece of textual change reinforcing the message of forgiveness.

The DVD includes a short documentary about the rediscovery of the mass, as well as excerpts from the recording in 5.1 Surround Sound.

I Fagiolini is an acclaimed British solo-voice ensemble specialising in Renaissance and Contemporary music. An inspired programmer, Robert Hollingworth founded the group in 1986.

“There is nothing ordinary about a performance by I Fagiolini. These singers have made their reputation by turning their backs on convention” (The Guardian).

“Beautifully performed by I Fagiolini with soloists and countless continuo parts, the polychoral effects are striking but harmonically not very interesting. Striggio's secular madrigals are more alluring, and at the end comes Tallis's more famous 40-part Spem in alium, done here with instruments, incomparably more subtle and moving, a masterpiece.” The Observer, 27th February 2011

“[I Fagiolini] do not perform Spem in Alium exactly as we are used to hearing it, for conductor Robert Hollingworth adds continuo to the voices there too, giving extra definition to the work's passing dissonances, which take it far beyond the sumptuous but bland harmonic world of Striggio's models.” The Guardian, 3rd March 2011 ****

“Decca’s engineers... did an excellent job balancing individual details against the total sound picture. Striggio’s music isn’t as richly textured as Tallis’s: no dissonant crunches, fewer soaring blasts. Yet you can still get hypnotised by the dappled flow of mellifluous chords, decorated with florid phrases winding round like honeysuckle.” The Times, 4th March 2011 ****

“Though Striggio's more formal Italian harmonic decorum precludes the kind of harmonic complexities that make Tallis's masterwork such a superb experience, it nonetheless inhabits a powerfully affecting landscape, and is arranged here for period orchestration featuring viols, cornetts, lutes and the like.” The Independent, 4th March 2011 ****

“[The Striggio's] impact in this premiere recording by the voices and period instruments of I Fagiolini under Robert Hollingworth is terrific...Far from splurging his ample resources at once, Striggio juxtaposes passages of differing density, guided by the implications of the Mass text, to create a dramatic expanse in which the full effect of the 40 (or 60) voices is all the more powerful for having been kept in reserve.” The Telegraph, 6th March 2011 *****

“The instruments transfigure much of this music. They do the heavy lifting for some of the choir parts in the Mass and Ecce beatum lucem, contribute to the spacious sonorities, and add delicate moments of colour...Without instruments, the I Fagiolini voices can be tender and nuanced.” BBC Music Magazine, April 2011 ****

“The ear is constantly taken by details in the elephantine crowd, a distant tenor laughing up a scale, an abrasive shawm doubling a choir's 'hosanna'...Tallis's Spem in Alium is performed with instruments, a legitimate and rare event.” Classic FM Magazine, May 2011 ****

“I Fagiliolini seem to revel in the showy splendour of it all...Hollingworth has chosen his combination of voices and instruments with care...Worth hearing? Definitely.” Gramophone Magazine, May 2011

“So, what's all the fuss about? It all comes down to the three 'S's -size, sonority and seductive spirituality (maybe that's four)...one of the most ambitious and worthwhile Early Music projects for years. That it's a hit too can only be a good thing for all concerned. An important and outstanding release.” International Record Review, May 2011

“Musically the Striggio is much simpler than the Tallis...But there are other things to enjoy with Striggio’s Italian style, which is often much more intricate and ornate...The disc is superbly recorded, capturing the huge scale of the music, whilst retaining plenty of detail.” Chris O'Reilly, Presto Classical, 7th March 2011

GGramophone Awards 2011

Best of Category - Early Music

Decca - 4782734

(CD)

$16.50

(Sorry, download not available in your country)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Tallis: Spem in Alium

Tallis: Spem in Alium


Tallis:

God Grant we grace (Tallis Canon)

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

PCA augmented

Hear the voice and prayer

If ye love me

O Lord, give thy holy spirit

Lamentations of Jeremiah I & II

In ieiunio et fletu

Mihi autem nimis

O sacrum convivium

Salvator mundi

O nata lux de lumine 5vv

Te lucis ante terminum


Pro Cantione Antiqua, Mark Brown (director)

Alto - ALC1082

(CD)

$7.75

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

Tallis: Spem in alium

Tallis: Spem in alium

and other choral works


Tallis:

O salutaris hostia for five voices

In ieiunio et fletu

Salvator mundi, salva nos 1 & 2

In manus tuas

Lamentations of Jeremiah I & II

O sacrum convivium

O nata lux de lumine 5vv

Te lucis ante terminum

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'


Winchester Cathedral Choir, Winchester College Quiristers & Vocal Arts Chorus, David Hill

“A thrilling large scale performance” CD Review

“Never before has Spem in alium, Tallis's great 40-part motet, so closely resembled The Last Judgement as it does in this vast and awesome performance” Gramophone Magazine

Hyperion - up to 25% off

Hyperion 30th Anniversary - CDA30024

(CD)

Normally: $12.25

Special: $9.18

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

A Year at King's

A Year at King's


Allegri:

Miserere mei, Deus

Barber, S:

Agnus Dei

Eccard:

When to the temple Mary went

Guerrero:

Canite tuba in Sion

Holst:

Nunc dimittis, H127

Lasso:

Videntes stellam

Palestrina:

Hodie Christus natus est

Pärt:

O Weisheit

O Immanuel: Magnificat - Antiphons

Philips, P:

Surgens Jesus

Poulenc:

Videntes stellam (No. 3 from Quatre Motets pour le temps de Noël, Op.152)

Stanford:

Coelos Ascendit Hodie, Op. 38 No. 2

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

Tavener:

Away in a Manger

Victoria:

Ascendens Christus in altum

Wood, C:

Tis the day of Resurrection


The paired ancient and modern settings represented on the album showcase the vast range of music that the choir performs each season reflecting Christ’s birth, death and resurrection through the festivals of Advent, Christmas, Candlemas, Lent, Easter and Ascension. The rest of the year, known as Ordinary time, is focused more on Christ’s ministry on earth.

A Year at King’s includes such favourites as Allegri’s Miserere and Barber’s Agnus Dei, an arrangement of his famous Adagio for Strings, as well as the first recording of Tavener’s Away in a Manger, written for King’s College Choir’s 2004 ‘Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols’. The rest of the programme comprises works composed between the 15th and 20th centuries by Palestrina, Pärt and Poulenc, Lassus, Holst, Guerrero, Eccard, Peter Philips and Stanford. The disc is rounded off with a spectacular performance of Tallis’s Spem in alium. On this, as on many previous King’s College Choir recordings, the conductor is Stephen Cleobury, organist and Director of Music at King’s since 1982.

King Henry VI founded King’s College in 1441. Six centuries later, these daily services in the magnificent chapel that is one of the jewels of Britain’s cultural and architectural heritage are the raison d’être for, and a central part in, the lives of the Choir’s 16 choristers, 14 choral scholars and two organ scholars.

The international reputation of the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge was established by the radio broadcast worldwide of the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols each Christmas Eve, heard currently by an audience estimated in the tens of millions, and has been consolidated by regular international tours and by the critical and commercial success of its EMI Classics releases.

In recent seasons the Choir has travelled throughout Europe as well as to the US, South America, Australia and Asia-Pacific for performances at churches, festivals and cultural centres. Of course, the Choir also performs extensively in the United Kingdom, appearing regularly at all the major halls in London and in the regions, both a cappella and with orchestras. In 2009 they joined other Cambridge artists, ensembles and the BBC Symphony Orchestra under Sir Andrew Davis in a BBC Prom to mark the 800th anniversary of Cambridge University. This summer, they appear at the Cambridge and Chester Music Festivals, at the latter of which they perform two extracts from A Year at King’s.

Palm Sunday 2009 saw The Choir of King's College, Cambridge undertake a unique project in collaboration with Opus Arte and the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Under the direction of Stephen Cleobury and partnered by the Academy of Ancient Music, the Choir's performance of Handel's Messiah in King's College Chapel was screened live by satellite to cinemas throughout the UK, mainland Europe and Northern America. This first ever live broadcast of a choral concert anywhere in the world was undertaken as part of the King's Easter Festival as well as to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the death of Handel and the 800th anniversary of Cambridge University. The CD of this performance was released by EMI Classics shortly following the event and the DVD in November 2009.

King's Choir played a key part in the BBC’s new Easter schedule in 2010: BBC TV broadcast Easter at King's, an Easter service sung by the Choir and filmed in the Chapel; BBC Radio 3 broadcast two concerts from King's over the Easter period, James MacMillan's St John and a concert of sacred music with the Britten Sinfonia.

The most recent releases by the Choir, under exclusive contract with EMI Classics, include the 80th anniversary broadcast of A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols; the above-mentioned Handel’s Messiah on CD and DVD; England, My England, a patriotic collection of English choral favourites that topped the UK classical artist charts and became EMI Classics’ UK best-selling title of 2009; and a stunning selection of Tudor anthems entitled I Heard a Voice.

"A crowning glory of our civilisation" Sir Peter Maxwell Davies

"I would happily sit in King’s College Chapel listening to this choir sing for the rest of my days." Richard Morrison, The Times

“Allegri's Miserere brings an outstandingly involving interpretation to light, the stratospheric top Cs for solo treble not unduly spotlighted, and marvellously natural unison phrasing in the plainchant sections...[a] firmly recommendable introduction to how the King's choir sounds at present.” BBC Music Magazine, September 2010 ****

“...highly proficient, taking easily in their stride the most elaborate polyphony and answering all the demands...The great motet by Tallis is heard in a new way, moving ahead with resolution and assurance.” Gramophone Magazine, September 2010

EMI - 6090042

(CD)

$18.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

40 Voices

40 Voices


Ceuleers:

Nomen mortis infame

Comes, J B:

Gloria

Despres:

Qui habitat

Gabrieli, G:

Exaudi me Domine

Maessins:

En venant de Lyon

Rebelo:

Lauda Jerusalem

Striggio:

Ecce beatam lucem

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

Wylkynson:

Jesus autem transiens/Credo in Deum


While the latter half of the sixteenth century saw the first stirrings of the Baroque, this period also witnessed the creation of the finest cathedrals in sound, with their foundations in the distant Gothic era of music ... Composers vied with each other in daring and ingenuity, presenting works with twelve, sixteen, twenty-four and even, in the case of Tallis’s famous Spem in alium, forty different voices! The Huelgas Ensemble celebrates its thirty-fifth anniversary with a spectacular selection of these works, recorded live without a ‘safety net’.

“...as the many polyphonic strands surround you – and here they do surround you, thanks to this hybrid SACD – you’d have to have a cold heart not to be caught up in the performances. The ingenuity of the composers is extraordinary” Andrew McGregor, bbc.co.uk, 14th February 2007

“this live recording testifies to their astonishing dynamism, energy and coherence.” Gramophone Magazine

Super Audio CD

Format:

Hybrid Multi-channel

Harmonia Mundi - HMC801954

(SACD)

$16.50

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

The Sixteen - Sounds Sublime

The Sixteen - Sounds Sublime

Includes some of The Sixteen’s most celebrated recordings in this beautiful 2CD digi-pack set


Allegri:

Miserere mei, Deus

Bach, J S:

Cantata BWV147 'Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben': Jesu, bleibet meine Freude

Magnificat in D major, BWV243: Magnificat anima mea Dominum

Quoniam tu solus sanctus (from Mass in B minor)

Cum Sancto Spiritu (from Mass in B minor)

Cantata BWV50 'Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft'

Barber, S:

Agnus Dei

Bernstein:

Spring Song (Chorus from The Lark)

Brahms:

Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen (from Ein Deutsches Requiem, Op. 45)

Britten:

Advance Democracy

A Hymn of Saint Columba

Daniel-Lesur:

La voix du bien-aime (from Le Cantique des Cantiques)

Fauré:

Requiem: Pie Jesu

With the Academy of St Martin in the Fields

Handel:

Messiah: Hallelujah Chorus

Coronation Anthem No. 1, HWV258 'Zadok the Priest'

Israel in Egypt: Moses & the children of Israel

I will sing unto the Lord (from Israel in Egypt)

Arrival of the Queen of Sheba (from Solomon)

Samson: Let the bright seraphim

Lotti:

Crucifixus in 8 parts

Mozart:

Ave verum corpus, K618

With the Academy of St Martin in the Fields

Vesperae Solennes de Confessore, K339: Laudate Dominum

With the Academy of St Martin in the Fields

Padilla, J G:

Deus in adiutoriuminin

Palestrina:

Kyrie (from Missa Papae Marcelli)

Poulenc:

Una hora (from Sept Répons des Ténèbres)

With the BBC Philharmonic

Purcell:

Man that is born of a woman, Z27

Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets

Scarlatti, D:

Iste Confessor

Sheppard, J:

Libera nos 1

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

Tavener:

The Lamb

Hymn to the Mother of God

Teixeira, A:

Te gloriosus Apostolorum Chorus (from Te Deum)

Victoria:

Ave Maria a 8

Officium Hebdomadae Sanctae: O Domine Iesu Christe

Vivaldi:

Gloria in excelsis Deo (Gloria in D)


Some of the most celebrated recordings from Harry Christophers and his award-winning ensemble. Equally appealing to fans of The Sixteen and those who are new to the group, this disc provides a definitive collection of familiar classics and lesser-known treasures.

Coro - COR16073

(CD - 2 discs)

$24.25

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

England My England

England My England


Bairstow:

Psalm 67: God be merciful unto us, and bless us

Bourgeois, T-L:

All people that on earth do dwell

arr. Vaughan William

The Wallace Collection

Britten:

Jubilate Deo in C major (1961)

Byrd:

Ave verum Corpus

Lustorum Animae

Delius:

To be sung of a summer night on the water, No. 1

Elgar:

Lux aeterna

arr. John Cameron

Gardiner, H B:

Evening Hymn (Te lucis ante terminum)

Gibbons, O:

Hosanna to the son of David

Drop, drop, slow tears

Goodenough, R P:

Psalm 150: O praise God in his holiness

Goss, J:

Praise my soul, the King of Heaven

descant Cleobury

Psalm 23: The Lord is my shepherd

Handel:

Coronation Anthem No. 1, HWV258 'Zadok the Priest'

Academy of Ancient Music

Messiah: Hallelujah Chorus

Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields

Harris, W:

Faire is the Heaven

Holst:

I Vow to Thee, My Country

Ireland:

Greater love hath no man

Michael Pearce (treble) & Paul Robinson (bass)

Miller, E:

When I survey the wondrous Cross

arr Rutter

Monk, W H:

Abide with me

Parry:

Jerusalem

Psalm 84: O how amiable are thy dwellings

Dear Lord and Father of Mankind (Repton)

Thomas Bullard (baritone)

I was glad

Parsons, R:

Ave Maria

Purcell:

Come ye sons of art (Ode for Queen Mary's birthday, 1694), Z 323

David Hansen (alto)

Academy of Ancient Music

Thou know'st, Lord, Z 58c

David Blackadder, Phillip Bainbridge, Susan Addison & Stephen Saunders (flatt trumpets)

Rutter:

Pie Jesu (from Requiem)

Edward Saklatvala (treble)

City of London Sinfonia

Requiem - Requiem aeterna

City of London Sinfonia

Scholefield:

The Day Thou gavest, Lord, is ended (St Clement)

arr Rutter

Stanford:

Beati quorum via, Op. 38 No. 3

Evening Service in G, Op. 81: Magnificat

Alastair Hussain (treble)

Tallis:

Spem in alium for eight five-part choirs '40-part Motet'

O nata lux de lumine 5vv

If ye love me

Tavener:

Song for Athene

Vaughan Williams:

Come down, O Love divine (Down Ampney)

Let all the world in every corner sing

English Chamber Orchestra

Mass in G minor – Kyrie

John Eaton (treble), Nigel Perrin (alto), Robin Doveton (tenor) & David van Asch (bass)

Weelkes:

When David Heard


Thomas Williamson, Peter Stevens, Oliver Brett, James Lancelot, Benjamin Bayl, James Vivian, Tom Winpenny, Christopher Hughes (organ scholars)

Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, Cambridge University Musical Society Chorus, New Philharmonia Orchestra & Band of the Royal Military School of Music, Kneller Hall, Stephen Cleobury, Sir Philip Ledger & Sir David Willcocks

There is surely no more quintessentially English sound than that of the Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, its unaccompanied voices – evocative of immemorial sandstone, of cool cloisters, of evensong in church, chapel and cathedral – serene in the music of Shakespeare’s contemporaries Byrd and Gibbons, ethereal in Delius heard of a summer’s night across the Backs of the River Cam.

No less iconic is the chapel that lends its unique acoustic to that sound. One of the glories of the English perpendicular style of architecture, it was eventually completed in 1547, a little over a century after the founding of the college itself by Henry VI.

This collection opens and closes with coronation music: Zadok the Priest was written for the crowning of George II in 1727, I was glad for that of Edward VII in 1902. Both were so successful that they have been sung at every coronation since their premières. Parry’s ‘processional anthem’ is heard here in its full panoply of extra brass and shouted Vivats, the choir of King’s choir providing the semi-chorus in the exquisite interlude ‘O pray for the peace of Jerusalem’.

In between are motets ancient and modern – from the miniature If ye love me and the architectural splendour of the 40-part Spem in alium to William Harris’s dramatic double-choir Spenser setting Faire is the Heaven; well-known psalms sung to Anglican chant; and favourite hymns, notably All people that on earth do dwell, arranged ceremonially for another coronation, that of Elizabeth II.

As well as national rejoicing there is solemn remembrance. Come ye sons of art away is Purcell’s 1694 birthday ode for Queen Mary, Thou knowest, Lord part of the music he wrote for her funeral just nine months later. John Ireland’s Greater love hath no man is often heard on Remembrance Sunday; Sir John Tavener’s Song for Athene made a powerful impression at the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales; while John Rutter’s small-scale, personal Requiem touched a wider public following the attacks of 11 September 2001. But ‘Nimrod’ above all epitomises music of national remembrance. Here a choral setting of it, Lux aeterna, represents our ‘Shakespeare of music’, Edward Elgar.

“This anthology… is undeniably useful in gathering to one place these scattered gems of excellence, the more so the King's College performances guarantee a consistently high level of interpretation in repertoire they would regard as home territory.” BBC Music Magazine, November 2009 ****

EMI - 2289440

(CD - 2 discs)

$18.00

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

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