Purcell: Why should men quarrel? (from The Indian Queen, Z630)

This page lists all recordings of Why should men quarrel? (from The Indian Queen, Z630), by Henry Purcell (1659-95) on CD & download (MP3 & FLAC).

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Miriam Allan sings Handel & Purcell

Miriam Allan sings Handel & Purcell


Handel:

Silete venti, HWV242

Trio Sonata, HWV399 in G major, Op. 5 No. 4

Purcell:

Music for a while, Z583

If love's a sweet passion (from The Fairy Queen, Z628)

Fairest Isle (from King Arthur)

Third Act Hornpipe (From King Arthur)

I am come to lock all fast (from The Fairy Queen)

Why should men quarrel? (from The Indian Queen, Z630)

Curtain Tune from Timon of Athens Z632

She loves and she confesses too, Z413

O! fair Cedaria, hide those eyes Z402

Chacony in G minor - for Two Violins, Viola and Bass Z730


Miriam Allan (soprano)

Ironwood

Miriam Allan made her Glyndebourne debut in 2009 in Purcell’s Fairy Queen and her Monteverdi concerts with Les Arts Florissants sold out in London and Paris. Ironwood is an innovative Australian ensemble committed to historically informed performance.

“Alla reveals herself as what these days could almost be termed an 'old-fashioned' early music singer, which is to say bell-like in tone and fearless in the use of non-vibrato...she shows impressive agility in the passagework of 'Date serta' but in general she still needs to take greater interpretative command and find a more generous way of shaping phrases.” Gramophone Magazine, Awards Issue 2012

ABC Classics - ABC4764997

(CD)

$14.25

(also available to download from $10.00)

In stock - usually despatched within 1 working day.

In War & Peace - Vinyl Edition

In War & Peace - Vinyl Edition


Handel:

Scenes of horror (from Jephtha)

Svegliatevi nel core (from Giulio Cesare)

Pensieri, voi mi tormentate! (from Agrippina)

Lascia ch'io pianga (from Rinaldo)

Da tempeste il legno infranto (from Giulio Cesare)

Crystal streams in murmurs flowing: Susanna

Augeletti che cantate (from Rinaldo)

Cara speme (from Giulio Cesare)

Jommelli:

Sprezza il furor del vento (from Attila Regolo)

Par che di Giubilo (from Attilio Regolo)

Leo:

Prendi quel ferro, o barbaro! (from Andromaca)

Monteverdi:

Illustratevi, o cieli (from Il ritorno di Ulisse in patria)

Purcell:

They tell us that your mighty powers, Z630

When I am laid in earth (from Dido and Aeneas)

O lead me to some peaceful gloom (from Bonduca or The British Heroine, Z574)

Why should men quarrel? (from The Indian Queen, Z630)


Joyce DiDonato (mezzo)

Il Pomo d'Oro, Maxim Emelyanychev

“Perhaps my most personal project to date,” is how American mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato describes In War and Peace: Harmony through Music. Her ambitions for this collection of arias from Baroque operas are substantial. Surrounded as we are by instability, she hopes it will help us find an answer to a vitally important question: “In the midst of chaos, how do you find peace?”

Her aim is to “steer conversation and discourse … to help all of us find peace in our lives in a dynamic way … As I have tried to convey in this selection of music, the power to bravely tip the scales towards peace lies firmly within every single one of us.”

DiDonato, an opera singer who certainly does not live in an ivory tower, was motivated to assemble the programme after the terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015. She had been planning an exploratory album with an emphasis on rare arias, but in the light of the tragic events she rethought her approach, giving it wider and deeper implications.

In War and Peace: Harmony through Music was recorded with Il Pomo d’Oro under its principal conductor Maxim Emelyanychev. The programme comprises 15 arias divided into two sections: ‘War’ and ‘Peace’. Both contain music by Purcell and Handel – including, to close ‘War’, Dido’s dignified, but searing lament from Dido and Aeneas and Almirena’s haunting and heartbreaking ‘Lascia ch’io pianga’ from Rinaldo. An excerpt from Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse is included in ‘Peace’, which concludes with Cleopatra’s spirited and defiantly optimistic ‘Da tempeste il legno infranto’ from Giulio Cesare.

A further aria from Giulio Cesare is the bonus track for the album; it is Sesto’s touching apostrophe to hope, ‘Cara speme’, which Joyce DiDonato sings unforgettably on a floating whisper of breath.

In her search for peace and harmony, the American singer did not entirely desert her musicological quest, and the album also contains no fewer than three world premiere recordings: a ‘War’ aria from Andromaca by the Neapolitan composer Leonardo Leo (1694-1744), and two ‘Peace’ arias, from the operas Attila and Attilio Regolo, by another Neapolitan, Niccolò Jommelli (1714-1774).

When Baroque opera was at its height, the highly stylised art form was famously described by the English writer Dr Samuel Johnson as “an exotic and irrational entertainment which has always been combated, and always has prevailed”. It is nearly three centuries since he made that judgement, but opera has continued to prevail – by impassioning performers and thrilling and moving audiences: nothing rivals it in giving intense, compelling expression to matters of life, love and death. Over recent decades, opera of the Baroque era has gained a new and vigorous life, with frequent revivals of works by such masters as Handel, Monteverdi, Vivaldi and Purcell, and the rediscovery of operas by composers who had fallen into obscurity.

Fuelled by these arias, Joyce DiDonato is fervently committed the cause of engaging the hearts and minds of music-lovers around the world. As she leads the way forward, long may opera – and peace – prevail.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Erato - 0190295928414

(Vinyl - 2 discs)

$23.75

Scheduled for release on 4 November 2016. Order it now and we will deliver it as soon as it is available.

In War & Peace

In War & Peace

Harmony Through Music


Handel:

Scenes of horror (from Jephtha)

Svegliatevi nel core (from Giulio Cesare)

Pensieri, voi mi tormentate! (from Agrippina)

Lascia ch'io pianga (from Rinaldo)

Augeletti che cantate (from Rinaldo)

Crystal streams in murmurs flowing: Susanna

Da tempeste il legno infranto (from Giulio Cesare)

Jommelli:

Sprezza il furor del vento (from Attila Regolo)

Par che di Giubilo (from Attilio Regolo)

Leo:

Prendi quel ferro, o barbaro! (from Andromaca)

Monteverdi:

Illustratevi, o cieli (from Il ritorno di Ulisse in patria)

Purcell:

They tell us that your mighty powers, Z630

When I am laid in earth (from Dido and Aeneas)

O lead me to some peaceful gloom (from Bonduca or The British Heroine, Z574)

Why should men quarrel? (from The Indian Queen, Z630)


Joyce DiDonato (mezzo)

Il Pomo d'Oro, Maxim Emelyanychev

“Perhaps my most personal project to date,” is how American mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato describes In War and Peace: Harmony through Music. Her ambitions for this collection of arias from Baroque operas are substantial. Surrounded as we are by instability, she hopes it will help us find an answer to a vitally important question: “In the midst of chaos, how do you find peace?”

Her aim is to “steer conversation and discourse … to help all of us find peace in our lives in a dynamic way … As I have tried to convey in this selection of music, the power to bravely tip the scales towards peace lies firmly within every single one of us.”

DiDonato, an opera singer who certainly does not live in an ivory tower, was motivated to assemble the programme after the terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015. She had been planning an exploratory album with an emphasis on rare arias, but in the light of the tragic events she rethought her approach, giving it wider and deeper implications.

In War and Peace: Harmony through Music was recorded with Il Pomo d’Oro under its principal conductor Maxim Emelyanychev. The programme comprises 15 arias divided into two sections: ‘War’ and ‘Peace’. Both contain music by Purcell and Handel – including, to close ‘War’, Dido’s dignified, but searing lament from Dido and Aeneas and Almirena’s haunting and heartbreaking ‘Lascia ch’io pianga’ from Rinaldo. An excerpt from Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse is included in ‘Peace’, which concludes with Cleopatra’s spirited and defiantly optimistic ‘Da tempeste il legno infranto’ from Giulio Cesare.

A further aria from Giulio Cesare is the bonus track for the album; it is Sesto’s touching apostrophe to hope, ‘Cara speme’, which Joyce DiDonato sings unforgettably on a floating whisper of breath.

In her search for peace and harmony, the American singer did not entirely desert her musicological quest, and the album also contains no fewer than three world premiere recordings: a ‘War’ aria from Andromaca by the Neapolitan composer Leonardo Leo (1694-1744), and two ‘Peace’ arias, from the operas Attila and Attilio Regolo, by another Neapolitan, Niccolò Jommelli (1714-1774).

When Baroque opera was at its height, the highly stylised art form was famously described by the English writer Dr Samuel Johnson as “an exotic and irrational entertainment which has always been combated, and always has prevailed”. It is nearly three centuries since he made that judgement, but opera has continued to prevail – by impassioning performers and thrilling and moving audiences: nothing rivals it in giving intense, compelling expression to matters of life, love and death. Over recent decades, opera of the Baroque era has gained a new and vigorous life, with frequent revivals of works by such masters as Handel, Monteverdi, Vivaldi and Purcell, and the rediscovery of operas by composers who had fallen into obscurity.

Fuelled by these arias, Joyce DiDonato is fervently committed the cause of engaging the hearts and minds of music-lovers around the world. As she leads the way forward, long may opera – and peace – prevail.

Released or re-released in last 6 months

Erato - 0190295928469

(CD)

Normally: $13.25

Special: $11.75

Scheduled for release on 4 November 2016. Order it now and we will deliver it as soon as it is available.

Songs and Airs by Purcell

Songs and Airs by Purcell


Purcell:

O solitude, my sweetest choice, Z406

Ah! how sweet it is to love (from Tyrannic Love or The Royal Martyr, Z613)

Not all my torments can your pity move, Z400

Stript of their green our groves appear, Z444

Tell me, some pitying angel (The Blessed Virgin's Expostulation), Z196

If music be the food of love, Z379

Hark! The Echoing Air (from The Fairy Queen, Z629)

The fatal hour comes on apace, Z421

Incassum Lesbia, incassum rogas ('The Queen's Epicedium'), Z383

Sweeter than Roses (from Pausanius, the Betrayer of his Country, Z585)

Cupid, the slyest rogue alive, Z367

From silent shades ('Bess of Bedlam') Z370

Dear pretty youth (from The Indian Queen, Z630)

From Rosy Bow'rs (from Don Quixote)

An Evening Hymn 'Now that the sun hath veiled his light', Z193

Beneath a poplar's shadow (from Sophonisba or Hannibal's Overthrow, Z590)

I attempt from love's sickness to fly in vain (from The Indian Queen)

Let us dance (from Prophetess or The History of Dioclesian, Z627)

Fairest Isle (from King Arthur)

Nymphs and Shepherds, Z600

Amidst the shades and cool refreshing streams Z355

Love in their little veins inspires (from Timon of Athens, Z632)

Fly swift ye hours, Z369

They tell us that your mighty powers, Z630

Plainte - O, Let Me Weep (from The Fairy Queen, Z629)

In the black dismal dungeon of despair, Z190

See, even Night herself is here (from King Arthur, Z628)

Why should men quarrel? (from The Indian Queen, Z630)

Seek not to know (from The Indian Queen, Z630)

The History of King Richard the Second or The Sicilian Usurper: Retir'd from any mortal's sight, Z581

To arms, heroic Prince (from The Libertine Destroyed, Z600)

O lead me to some peaceful gloom (from Bonduca or The British Heroine, Z574)

Halcyon days (from King Arthur, Z629)

Bid the virtues (from Come ye Sons of Art, Z323)

Lord, what is man?, Z192

Music for a while, Z583

Sawney is a bonny lad, Z412

When I have often heard young maids complaining (from The Fairy Queen, Z629)

Ah! cruel, bloody fate (from Theodosius or The Force of Love, Z606)

Thy hand, Belinda … When I am laid in earth (from Dido & Aeneas)


Nancy Argenta (soprano)

Erato Veritas - 5618662

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